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dc.contributor.authorMead, Rebecca
dc.contributor.authorThurston, Miranda
dc.contributor.authorBloyce, Daniel
dc.date.accessioned2020-05-20T12:45:39Z
dc.date.available2020-05-20T12:45:39Z
dc.identifierhttps://chesterrep.openrepository.com/bitstream/handle/10034/623426/Mead%20et%20al%202020.pdf?sequence=3
dc.identifier.citationMead, R., Thurston, M, & Bloyce, D. (2020). From public issues to personal troubles: individualising social inequalities in health within local public health partnerships. Critical Public Healthen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/623426
dc.descriptionThis is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in [JOURNAL TITLE] on [date of publication], available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/[Article DOI].en_US
dc.description.abstractThis paper explores public health policy implementation through partnership working at the local level by examining how local actors from public health and the wider workforce, make sense of and work on social inequalities in health. An ethnographic case study was used to examine policy implementation in one local strategic partnership in north-west England during a period of significant resource constraint. Semi-structured interviews were the primary method of data generation. Sensitising concepts from figurational sociology were used to develop a theoretical account of how local policy implementation directed at narrowing social inequalities in health tended to give rise to relatively fragmented and short-term services, projects and practices, which focused on lifestyle factors and behaviour change. Theorising partnership work as figurations goes some way to explaining the apparent paradox among participants who expressed a relatively detached appreciation of wider social influences, alongside emotional involvement in their work. This process of individualisation explains how local professionals tended to conceptualise health inequality and the social determinants of health as personal troubles. Individualisation meant that the social reality of working in partnerships on difficult issues was simplified. Thus, any scope for working on the social determinants of health tended to be overlooked. The extent to which this was intentional or a matter of struggling to see opportunities, or a mixture of the two, was difficult to discern. Although the policy landscape has changed, the findings give some insight into understanding how local collaborative processes reproduce local public health work underpinned by lifestyle choices.en_US
dc.publisherTaylor and Francisen_US
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/en_US
dc.subjectHealth inequalityen_US
dc.subjectSocial determinants of healthen_US
dc.subjectIndividualisationen_US
dc.subjectPartnershipen_US
dc.subjectFigurational sociologyen_US
dc.titleFrom public issues to personal troubles: individualising social inequalities in health within local public health partnershipsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.eissn1469-3682en_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Lancaster; Inland Norway University of Applied Sciences; University of Chesteren_US
dc.identifier.journalCritical Public Healthen_US
or.grant.openaccessYesen_US
rioxxterms.funderCheshire West and Cheshire PCTen_US
rioxxterms.identifier.projectUnfundeden_US
rioxxterms.versionAMen_US
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1080/09581596.2020.1763916en_US
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2021-12-31
refterms.dateFCD2020-05-19T16:39:32Z
refterms.versionFCDAM
rioxxterms.publicationdate2020
dc.dateAccepted2020-04-30
dc.date.deposited2020-05-20en_US
dc.indentifier.issn0958-1596en_US


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