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dc.contributor.authorMabhala, Mzwandile
dc.contributor.authorYohannes, Asmait
dc.contributor.authorMassey, Alan
dc.contributor.authorReid, John
dc.date.accessioned2020-03-25T09:59:32Z
dc.date.available2020-03-25T09:59:32Z
dc.identifierhttp://www.ijpvmjournal.net/temp/IntJPrevMed11137-1986996_053109.pdfen_US
dc.identifier.citationMabhala, M. A., Yohannes, A., Massey, A., & Reid, J. A. (2020). Mind your language: Discursive practices produce unequal power and control over infectious disease: A critical discourse analysis. International Journal of Preventive Medicine, 11(1), 37.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/623279
dc.descriptionA review of how the language use to describe noncommunicable disease create heroes and vilians and maginalise the economic south populations.en_US
dc.description.abstractAbstract Background: Power, socioeconomic inequalities, and poverty are recognized as some of the fundamental determinants of differences in vulnerability of societies to infectious disease threats. The economic south is carrying a higher burden than those in the economic north. This raises questions about whether social preventions and biomedical preventions for infectious disease are given equal consideration, and about social institutions and structures that frame the debate about infectious disease. This article examines how institutionalized ways of talking about infectious disease reinforces, creates, and sustains health inequalities. Methodology: Critical discourse analysis was considered to be epistemologically and ontologically consistent with the aims and context of this study. Results: The study examined three types of infectious disease: • Emerging infectious diseases/pathogens • Neglected tropical diseases • Vector-borne infections. Examination revealed that poverty is the most common determinant of all three. Conclusion: A sustainable reduction in infectious disease in the southern countries is most likely to be achieved through tackling socioeconomic determinants. There is a need for a change in the discourse on infectious disease, and adopt a discourse that promotes self-determination, rather than one that reinforces the hero-victim scenario and power inequalities. Keyword: Critical discourse, inequalities, infectious disease, poverty, poweren_US
dc.publisherWolters Kluweren_US
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.ijpvmjournal.net/temp/IntJPrevMed11137-1986996_053109.pdfen_US
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/en_US
dc.subjectinfectious diseaseen_US
dc.subjecteconomic south and northen_US
dc.subjectinequalitiesen_US
dc.titleMind your Language: Discursive Practices Produce Unequal Power and Control Over Infectious Disease: A Critical Discourse Analysisen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.eissn2008-8213en_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Chesteren_US
dc.identifier.journalInternational Journal of Preventive Medicineen_US
or.grant.openaccessYesen_US
rioxxterms.funderunfundeden_US
rioxxterms.identifier.project265en_US
rioxxterms.versionAMen_US
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.4103/ijpvm.IJPVM_431_17en_US
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2020-03-16
refterms.dateFCD2020-03-25T05:38:05Z
refterms.versionFCDAM
refterms.dateFOA2020-03-16T00:00:00Z
rioxxterms.publicationdate2020-03-16
dc.dateAccepted2019-10-12
dc.date.deposited2020-03-25en_US
dc.indentifier.issn2008-7802en_US


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