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dc.contributor.authorLovett, Emily L.
dc.contributor.authorBloyce, Daniel
dc.contributor.authorSmith, Andy
dc.date.accessioned2020-03-04T09:33:37Z
dc.date.available2020-03-04T09:33:37Z
dc.date.issued2020-03-11
dc.identifier.citationLovett, E., Bloyce, D., & Smith, A. (2020). Delivering a sports participation legacy from the London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games: evidence from sport development workers in Birmingham and their experiences of a double-bind. Leisure Studies, 39(5), 659-672.en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/02614367.2020.1738534
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/623232
dc.descriptionThis is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Leisure Studies on 11 March 2020, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/02614367.2020.1738534.en_US
dc.description.abstractLegacy promises from London 2012 meant that those working in sport in local, non-host areas in Britain were expected to facilitate more sporting opportunities for local citizens. Legacy preparations occurred in the context of many other constraints that stemmed from Government budget cuts and provision of leisure-time sport and other leisure activities. This paper presents new evidence on a significantly under-researched area of leisure studies, namely: the experiences of those delivering leisure-sport opportunities in a non-host city and how they responded to national legacy promises. Using Elias’s concept of the double-bind, we explain the ‘crisis situation’ in which some local sports workers were enmeshed and how their acceptance of ‘fantasy-laden beliefs’ of expected demonstration effects from mega-events exacerbated their ‘crisis’ (Elias, 2007). We also draw upon participants’ post-Games reflections to consider how future host nations may wish to leverage greater leisure-sporting legacies from a mega-event.en_US
dc.publisherTaylor & Francisen_US
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/en_US
dc.subjectDouble-binden_US
dc.subjectEliasen_US
dc.subjectFigurational sociologyen_US
dc.subjectOlympicsen_US
dc.subjectLegacyen_US
dc.titleDelivering a sports participation legacy from the London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games: evidence from sport development workers in Birmingham and their experiences of a double-binden_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.eissn1466-4496en_US
dc.contributor.departmentEdge Hill University; University of Chesteren_US
dc.identifier.journalLeisure Studiesen_US
or.grant.openaccessYesen_US
rioxxterms.funderUnfundeden_US
rioxxterms.identifier.projectUnfunded - publication from PhD that was funded by the student's employeren_US
rioxxterms.versionAMen_US
rioxxterms.versionofrecordhttps://doi.org/10.1080/02614367.2020.1738534en_US
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2021-09-11
rioxxterms.publicationdate2020-03-11
dc.dateAccepted2020-02-25
dc.date.deposited2020-03-04en_US
dc.indentifier.issn0261-4367en_US


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Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International