• Expanding the frontier's of Africa's political environment

      Francis, Suzanne; Asuelime, Lucky; University of Chester; University of KwaZulu-Natal (Springer, 2014-08-19)
      The realities of conflicts, economic growth without development, policy development and the impact of capitalism and globalization continue to challenge existing theoretical and conceptual approaches. After several decades of independence and governance in the post-colonial period in Africa, many of the political and economic indicators are still not encouraging, despite important strides towards democratic consolidation and economic development. A country study approach to the continent of Africa illuminates the diversity of the African continent and indicates the ways in which the political and socio-economic contexts of African states bear directly upon the ability of states to solve the various political and economic challenges that they face.
    • Expanding the Frontiers of African Development Studies

      Francis, Suzanne; Asuelime, Lucky; Yaro, Joseph; University of Chester; University of KwaZulu-Natal; University of Ghana (Springer, 2014-07-01)
      A growing number of scholars acknowledge the interconnectedness of the myriad of problems and prospects across Africa as a relevant part of global development discourse. Given the ever-increasing importance of knowledge for the scholarly agenda and practice of African Studies, we present a picture of contemporary issues in African development. These themes are a microcosm in the general understanding and study of global development issues that confront humanity. This is hoped will lead to novel analytical frameworks, the emergence of new conceptual approaches, and empirical accounts of relevance to scholars studying Africa as well as practitioners in African development and policy makers.
    • The global south: The case of populational aging in Africa and Asia

      Powell, Jason; Taylor, Paul J.; University of Chester (World Scientific News, 2015-06)
      This paper explores the implications of social and economic changes in the Global South of the World. In particular, we examine case studies of Japan and China and the impact of populational aging on their economic policies and social practices. Key examples of uneven distributions of, or access to, opportunities have the potential to give rise to further social or economic tensions. Whilst the scholarly base is expanding, more is to be done to ascertain the characterization of inequalities. Indeed, if these substantive issues are to be addressed comprehensively, the key then is to move beyond a Western academic paradigm, and to purposefully involve critical scholarship from intellectuals from the Global South. Doing so will add a vitality of experience in discussing how economic growth is, or may not be coupled with, inequality.
    • Human Trafficking in South Africa: Political Conundrums and Consequences

      Francis, Suzanne; Emser, Monique; University of Chester; University of KwaZulu-Natal (Springer, 2014-06-11)
      Human trafficking remains a seemingly unsolvable problem despite over a decade of concerted international, regional and, increasingly, domestic attention. Little inroads have been made, especially in attempting to address its most prominent manifestation – human trafficking for the purposes of sexual exploitation. Most government resources, in states from which victims are trafficked and in those in which they are received, have focused upon attempting to end this form of human trafficking. This has been done in two ways: either through draconian measures that focus on the security of the state (and curbing migration), or by attempting to eradicate the sex industry through criminalisation of consumers, and the continued criminalisation of sex workers. Such strategies have had little measurable effect on the supply or demand of those trafficked, which suggests that such counter-trafficking measures remain largely ineffective. Moreover, this preoccupation with the dark, exploitative side of the sex industry has been at the expense of a focus upon what is thought to be a far more pervasive form of human trafficking (which also intersects with sexual exploitation), that is labour trafficking. (Labour trafficking is an umbrella term used to denote trafficking for forced and bonded labour (in an array of industries), which also includes domestic servitude and forced marriage, forced begging, and the exploitation in warfare.) Hence, only the ways in human trafficking is manifested is addressed, and not the root causes of the phenomenon.
    • Institutionalizing Elites: Political Elite Formation and Change in the KwaZulu-Natal Provincial Legislature

      Francis, Suzanne; University of Chester (Brill, 2011-12-19)
      In this book, Francis expands and redefines the approach to the problematic of a comprehensive framework for the study of political elites through an interrogation of political elite formation in the African context of the Provincial Legislature of KwaZulu-Natal. The result is an empirically rich and detailed study of the realization, accumulation and exercise of institutionalized political power. Political elite agency shapes, enables and undermines political institutions and is dependent on a multiplicity of currencies including social and political capital and patterns of culture, respect and institutional capacity. Studies of political elites must now consider not whether elite values, attitudes and patterns of political etiquette penetrate political institutions, but rather how they do so.
    • Media waves and moral panicking: The case of the FIFA World Cup 2010

      Francis, Suzanne; Emser, Monique; University of Chester; University of KwaZulu-Natal (Department of Political Sciences, University of Pretoria, 2014-11)
      As with previous international sporting events, the threat of human trafficking quickly became part of public consciousness during the lead up to the World Cup. Out of 350 articles covering human trafficking in South African newspapers between 2006 and 2010, 82 (or 24 per cent) directly linked this sporting event with human trafficking. We claim that media hypes based on constructed moral panics might be recycled in similar scenarios to that displayed during the FIFA World Cup, demonstrating the staying power of such media hypes and the utility of moral panics.
    • Oil Corrupts Elections: The Political Economy of Vote-Buying in Nigeria

      Francis, Suzanne; Onapajo, Hakeem; Uzodike, Ufo; University of Chester; University of KwaZulu-Natal (University of Florida, Center for African Studies, 2015-03)
      The extant perspectives on vote-buying have produced three central arguments around its causes, which are the factors of poverty, the electoral/voting system, and the nature of politics in the state. Going beyond these perspectives, this study presents the argument that vote-buying can also be explained by considering the nature of the political economy of a state, especially when the state is oil-‑dependent. The Nigerian case study demonstrates this argument. We employ the “oil-impedes-democracy” framework, which is a strand of the resource curse theory, to argue that the incidence of vote‑buying in Nigeria’s contemporary elections is prevalent because of the oil wealth associated with politics and elections in the state. This is because abundant oil wealth intensifies elite competition, which explains the use of all strategies to win elections including vote-buying. This is also facilitated by the fact that the political elite, especially the incumbent, have adequate access to oil wealth and spend it to “buy” elections and hold on to power. Voters, on their part, also prefer to sell their votes during elections to have a share of the “national cake” given their perception of the wealth associated with politics in Nigeria and the poor service delivery by politicians after assuming state offices.
    • Positioning and strengthening Africa's development through innovative educational policy on science, technology and innovation.

      Olaopa, Olawale; Uzodike, Nwabufo; Francis, Suzanne; Siyanbola, Willie; University of Chester; University of KwaZulu-Natal; University of Obafemi Awolowo (Mediateam IT, 2012)
      This article explores ways in which to position and to strengthen Africa's development through innovations in educational policy on science and technology.
    • Science, technology and innovation promotion: An alternative and new strategy for youth empowerment for Africa's development

      Olaopa, Olawale; Uzodike, Nwabufo; Siyanbola, Willie; Francis, Suzanne; University of Chester; University of KwaZulu-Natal; University of Obafemi Awolowo (Centre for Black and African Arts and Civilization, 2013)
      This chapter explores the promotion of science, technology and innovation as a new and alternative strategy of youth empowerment for Africa's development.
    • Selected themes in African Development Studies: Economic growth, governance and the environment

      Francis, Suzanne; Asuelime, Lucky; Yaro, Joseph; University of Chester; University of KwaZulu-Natal; University of Ghana (Springer / Palgrave Macmillan, 2014-07-01)
      A growing number of scholars acknowledge the interconnectedness of the myriad of problems and prospects across Africa as a relevant part of a global development discourse. Given the ever-increasing importance of knowledge for the scholarly agenda and practice of African Studies, we present a picture of contemporary issues in African development. This work presents a multi-disciplinary deeply contextual text on the important themes in development studies covering land questions, housing, water, health, economic liberalization, climate, environment, and gender. Though Africa’s problems transcend these basic sector issues, they still remain at the core of development concerns given the fact that many in Africa are food insecure, have poor access to health, water, housing, and are increasingly affected by global environmental change and global neoliberal economic policies. These themes are a microcosm in the general understanding and study of global development issues that confront humanity. This contribution, it is hoped will lead to new novel analytical frameworks, the emergence of new conceptual approaches, and empirical accounts of relevance to scholars studying Africa as well as practitioners in African development.
    • Selected Themes in African Political Studies: Political Conflict and Stability

      Francis, Suzanne; Asuelime, Lucky; University of Chester; University of KwaZulu-Natal; University of Lagos (Springer / Palgrave Macmillan, 2014-08-19)
      Africa has a long, and contemporary, record of political instability. Any political history of the continent of Africa is incomplete without contextual accounts of these exchanges; that is, processes in which governments are over-thrown, borders are shifted, countless human lives lost, property and infrastructure worth millions irreplaceably damaged, the forced displacement of untold numbers of people, and economic meltdown. In this book, the authors explore a range of political and conflict situations, discuss efforts to develop indigenous conflict resolution mechanisms and consider some of the key political and economic issues facing the continent.