• Alternative salvations?

      Swinton, Valda; University of Chester (British Association for Counselling and Psychotherapy, 2013)
      In our secular and diverse culture people may be seeking to fill the vacuum that religion played in the lives of preceding generations. The word salvation does conform to a set of beliefs that is set out in the Christian scriptures and the means by which to attain this salvation. This understanding of the nature, grounds, and means of obtaining salvation. This understanding of salvation is grounded uniquely in the life, death and resurrection of Jesus Christ. This is not the salvation that is experience in counselling training or therapy.
    • Developmental Trauma and the Role of Epigenetics

      Kiyimba, Nikki; University of Chester (British Association for Counselling and Psychotherapy, 2016-10-31)
      This is an article investigating the role of epigenetics in developmental trauma, providing fascinating insights into the debate about the relationship between nature and nurture, and the possibilities for healing
    • Pastoral supervision for clergy and pastoral workers: A personal perspective

      Gubi, Peter M.; University of Chester (British Association for Counselling and Psychotherapy, 2016-07-01)
      NA
    • Reclaiming the spiritual in Reflective Practice Groups for Clergy

      Gubi, Peter M.; University of Chester (British Association for Counselling and Psychotherapy, 2017-07-01)
      Reclaiming the spiritual in reflective practice groups
    • Researching spirituality in counselling training

      Swinton, Valda; University of Chester (British Association for Counselling and Psychotherapy, 2007)
      The spiritual is always present and this presence manifests itself in the learning environment. In conclusion, education and training within the area of psychology, religion, - spirituality appears to be very limited. Yet the finding suggests that counsellors are interested in the exploration of spirituality in counsellor training.
    • Supporting Church of England clergy through the provision of Reflective Practice Groups

      Gubi, Peter M.; Korris, Jan; University of Chester (British Association for Counselling and Psychotherapy, 2015-12-01)
      NA
    • Where do we go from zero?

      Reeves, Andrew; University of Chester (British Association for Counselling and Psychotherapy, 2018-09-30)
      When writing about working with suicide risk, the temptation is to focus only on the practical details – contracting, managing confidentiality and so on – as these are often at the forefront of practitioners’ minds. However, in this article I want to explore working with suicide potential from a more relational perspective – once we move beyond the risk assessment tools and questionnaires, where do we go next?
    • Working with Risk of Suicide

      Reeves, Andrew; University of Chester (British Association for Counselling and Psychotherapy, 2018-10-31)
      This article considers the challenges faced by counsellors and psychotherapists in their daily work with suicidal clients. Specifically, it considers a number of key practice areas, including: policies and procedures; personal perspectives; managing confidentiality; positive risk-taking; supervision and self-care; and responding to suicidal potential. A number of practice guidelines are suggested.
    • Working with Suicidal Clients in the Counselling Professions

      Reeves, Andrew; University of Chester
      An information sheet for members of BACP for working with suicidal clients in the counselling professions.
    • Working with the spiritual in counselling and psychotherapy

      Swinton, Valda; Jay, Colin; University of Chester (British Association for Counselling and Psychotherapy, 2014)
      If you like me, are from a religious background and have therefore had a ready-made language to discuss the spiritual dimension of human experience, you may have struggled to know how to work with the spiritual dimension of clients coming for therapy. Ethically, now, as counsellors we must consider spirituality in relation to diversity, as spirituality could be an element in our clients’ cultural experience. There may be no shared language or understanding to address this dimension and this is problematic. The separation of spirituality from religion has meant that there may be no shared understanding of what spirituality means. Consequently there may be as many definitions of spirituality as there are people (in terms of what spirituality means for individuals).