• Chapter 5 Film: Using secondary data as a mechanism to support student learning

      Lafferty, Moira E.; University of Chester (Routledge, 2017-05-02)
      INTRODUCTION This chapter introduces readers to the concept of using feature films as a method for seminar tasks, formative and summative assessment within the social sciences. Drawing on personal experiences, reflection and student feedback examples are given as to how feature films have been used in a final year undergraduate sport psychology module. I begin by charting my own journey discussing how I came to use feature films in assessment. I identify the key literature which provided the evidence base for the task development and review the benefits and caveats to such an approach. Finally, along with a flow chart to help guide those who may wish to use the technique I comment on some future uses of the approach within assessment.
    • Developing an Integrated Approach

      Tod, David; Lafferty, Moira; Liverpool John Moores University; University of Chester (Routledge, 2020-05-05)
      Integration occurs when consultants combine multiple theoretical orientations and ways of operating to enhance the efficacy, effectiveness, efficiency, and ethical standing of services they provide clients. There is no one model of integration. The models practitioners develop are shaped by their histories, inclinations, and proclivities; the contexts and cultures in which they operate; the types of work they undertake; and the clients they serve. Integrated models allow practitioners to feel congruent, authentic, and comfortable with the ways they help clients. In this chapter, we define integration, discuss why it is viable in our field, examine ways practitioners integrate service delivery systems, consider obstacles to integration, and suggests ways educators and supervisors can assist practitioners.
    • Developing Heads of Department to Manage Quality: An examination of Performance Management Frameworks

      Warren, Jeremy J.; University of Chester (Routledge, 2018-07-03)
      The chapter addresses a number of questions related to the impact of performance management policies and processes upon the delivery of good quality teaching and learning; examining the advantages that can be gained from the analysis of good quality data but also recognising some of the ‘pit-falls and bear-traps’ that may be encountered if decision-makers do not take into account the limitations of an over reliance upon performance metrics. The chapter provides a short historical context to the development of a performance culture in the UK before considering how performance has been both measured and treated in other countries, discussing examples from the Netherlands, Pakistan, Canada, the USA and China that sought to introduce frameworks for the most effective disbursement and use of available funds for Research purposes. The chapter goes on to review some of the formal approaches that have been developed to support performance management and monitoring within organisations, including the Balanced Scorecard, Total Quality Management (TQM) and the European Foundation for Quality Management (EFQM). The conclusion to the chapter starts with an examination of the introduction of the Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF) in the UK, with the resultant need to collect robust performance data to support the metrics already supplied as part of statutory data returns. Finally considering the roles that individuals can play in the delivery and maintenance of quality management systems that enhance institutions and do not act as proverbial mill-stones.
    • Exploring and assessing the current sexual interest of men who have committed sexual and non-sexual violent offences

      Akerman, Geraldine; Hardy, Jennifer; Paul, Hamilton
      Assessing current sexual interest in men who have committed sexual offence can be somewhat problematic, particularly in relation to those who are serving probation, where disclosing offence-related sexual interest may lead to a serious penalty (eg incarceration). This chapter describes the Current Sexual Interest Measure (CSIM) and how it was used to assess men serving their sentence in the community in Texas, USA; comparing them to two groups of men in custody in the United Kingdom. Those serving their sentence in the UK included a group of men who had been convicted of sexual offences, as well as a group of men convicted of violent offences to provide contrasting data. Both groups of men were participating in therapy in a prison-based therapeutic community and so possible effects on the data are considered. In addition, data were collected from men in a lower-security prison to provide further contrast.
    • Limb preference and personality in donkeys (Equus asinus)

      Diaz, Sergio; Murray, Lindsay Elaine; Rodway, Paul; University of Chester; Universidad Autónoma de Madrid
      Interhemispheric laterality has often been linked to different behavioural styles. This study investigates the link between limb preference and personality in donkeys. The sample consisted of 47 donkeys (Equus asinus), 30 males and 17 females. Limb preference was determined using observation of the leading limb in a motionless posture and personality was measured using the Donkey Temperament Questionnaire (French, J. M. (1993). Assessment of donkey temperament and the influence of home environment. Applied Animal Behaviour Science, 36(2), 249–257. doi:10.1016/0168-1591(93)90014-G) completed by the donkeys’ keepers. A Principal Component Analysis obtained two components: Agreeableness and Extraversion. Age showed a positive relationship with Agreeableness, echoing trends in humans Donkeys did not show a population-level preference towards either side. Limb preference significantly predicted the trait difficult to handle: donkeys with a preference to keep the right foot forward when motionless were harder to handle. This study presents the first investigation into limb preference and personality in donkeys, although more research is needed to clarify whether there is a population-level limb preference bias in donkeys, and the relationship between limb preference and Agreeableness.
    • School peer counselling for bullying services as a source of social support: A study with secondary school pupils

      Boulton, Michael J.; University College Chester (Routledge, 2005)
      99 school pupils were interviewed to ascertain their views of the peer counselling for bullying service in their own school, with a focus on the issue of social support for bullying-related problems, were conducted. Three themes were addressed: willingness to use the service relative to other potential sources of support; preferred gender and age of peer counsellor; and disclosure of using the service to friends.
    • Secondary school pupils’ views of their school peer counselling for bullying service

      Boulton, Michael J.; Trueman, Mark; Bishop, Samantha; Baxandall, Emma; Holme, Abigail; Smith, Sarah-Louise; Vohringer, Fernanda; Boulton, Louise; University of Chester ; Keele University ; Keele University ; Keele University ; Keele University; Keele University; Keele University; Keele University (Routledge, 2007-08-10)
      This article discusses a study of 99 interviews with pupils from two secondary schools in the UK on their views and experiences of the peer counselling for bullying service set up in their school. They were asked about various things concerning the characteristics of the service and service providers that they valued and their reasons for not using the service.
    • User perceptions of process–outcome linkages in pupil peer counselling for bullying services in the UK

      Boulton, Michael J.; Trueman, Mark; Rotenberg, Ken J.; University of Chester ; Keele University ; Keele University (Routledge, 2007-07-24)
      50 users of pupil peer counselling for bullying services rated their most helpful and their least helpful experiences of these services on five counselling process variables.