• Book review: Crimes of Mobility. Criminal Law and the Regulation of Immigration, written by Ana Aliverti

      Holiday, Yewa; University of Chester (Brill, 2014-05-23)
      Book review: Crimes of Mobility. Criminal Law and the Regulation of Immigration, written by Ana Aliverti
    • The Criminalisation of Irregular Migrants

      Mitsilegas, Valsamis; Holiday, Yewa; Queen Mary University of London; University of Chester (Routledge, 2018-07-03)
      The criminalisation of irregular migrants – in relation to irregular entry, residence, and work – is considered against the 1975 and 1990 ILO Migrant Workers Conventions (MWC); the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights 1966 (ICCPR); the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights 1966 (ICESCR); the UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDG); and the Convention against Transnational Organized Crime 2000, including its Protocols to Prevent, Suppress and Punish Trafficking in Persons, Especially Women and Children (‘the Trafficking Protocol’) and against the Smuggling of Migrants by Land, Sea and Air (‘the Smuggling Protocol’). The creation of laws, which are generally applied only to foreigners – concerning irregular entry, residence, and work – increases costs and exposure to adverse labour conditions and social vulnerabilities, and also impedes access to justice. The possibilities of criminal conviction, resulting in fines, imprisonment and expulsion contribute to a precarious class of low-skilled migrant. The chapter argues that the criminalisation of migration exacerbates the migrant premium because it decreases income while increasing dependency on employers, smugglers and traffickers and complicates access to human rights protection. The chapter suggests that one of the policy propositions for the Global Compact should be an understanding of how the emphasis internationally, regionally and nationally on smuggling and trafficking and border control has resulted in the criminalisation of irregular migrants – both potential and actual - for the ways in which they enter, leave, reside and work in a country; and that migrants need to be able to manage their working needs in a flexible manner.
    • Gan's Journey from Thailand

      Holiday, Yewa; Gan; University of Chester (Routledge, 2018-07-03)
      Gan’s situation is assessed in relation to the 1975 and 1990 ILO Migrant Workers Conventions (MWC). Article 12(g) of the 1975 MWC provides for equal treatment in working conditions for migrants. Article 25(a) of the 1990 MWC provides for equality of treatment in relation to health and article 28 requires access to medical care and safety in working conditions. Gan provides a personal insight into his experience as an international labour migrant in Saudi Arabia and the UK. Gan had a work accident on a construction site which eventually prevented him from working and thus stopped him from sending remittances to his family. Gan’s migrant premium is represented by the burden of ill health, the cost of a private operation in Thailand and its inability to correct his longstanding pain, the initial ignorance of UK doctors of the severity of his health needs, total loss of income and savings and reducing remittances to his family in Thailand. The chapter takes the form of an interview with Gan who generously shares his experiences of his migrant premium. Gan does all he can to fight against his migrant premium by trying to find a way to work despite the pain. However, the migrant premium prevents him from working, something which was – and continues to be - a strong part of his identity. The chapter suggests that one of the policy propositions for the Global Compact should be an understanding of the long term consequences and impact of discriminatory working conditions for the health of international labour migrants.