• 1 & 2 Thessalonians through the centuries

      Thiselton, Anthony; University of Chester (Wiley-Blackwell, 2010-11-26)
      This book discusses the evolution of religious beliefs and practices resulting from the first two of St. Paul's Epistles.
    • A Latter-Day Saint approach to addiction: Aetiology, consequences and treatment in a theological context

      Holt, James D.; University of Chester (MDPI, 2014-12-24)
      This article explores the theological underpinning of the nature, aetiology and treatment of addictions within The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. The first section outlines the “plan of salvation” and how this provides the theological framework for the source and solution to addictions. The final section explores addiction against this background in terms of its aetiology, types, consequences and treatment in a Latter-day Saint context. In so doing it builds on the recognition by the Church in recent years that addiction is a problem in the lives of some of its members and that treatment programs coherent with its teachings and beliefs are necessary. The article concludes by suggesting that while addiction may be more openly discussed within a Latter-day Saint context there is a need to keep this dialogue moving forward. This article does not examine Latter-day Saint teaching within the wider context of psychotherapy and other definitions of addiction; rather it explores the place of addiction as understood within the theological and ecclesiological context of Mormonism.
    • Abraham, Testament of: Reception in Literature

      Collins, Matthew A.; University of Chester (De Gruyter, 2009-06-01)
      Encyclopaedia article on the reception of the Testament of Abraham in literature.
    • Action Research as a Way of Doing Theology (ART): Transforming My Practice of Preaching the Bible with My Congregation

      Boyd, Jason C. (University of Chester, 2015-03-30)
      This thesis explores action research as a way of doing theology (ART). The contours of ART emerged through a collaborative inquiry into my practice of preaching the Bible within the context of congregational worship. It began with a niggling question, “What was happening in the communication space between me and my congregation?” An action research pilot project (March-April 2006) with Cumnock Congregational Church (Minister, 1998 - 2008) prepared the ground for a collaborative inquiry with Witney Congregational Church (Minister, 2009 - present). With the latter congregation we developed Word Café, an adaption of Brown and Isaacs World Café (2005), as a method of creating communicative space (Wicks & Reason, 2009) in which we explored our experience of what happened when I preached a sermon and examined what, if any changes, occurred during the period of November 2010 to July 2011. This is ideographic research and as such engages in first and second person inquiry, weaving together the voices and insights of participants. In the first person I integrate my spiritual formation and academic development with my vocation as a preacher. In the second person I give an account of the way in which I entered into a collaborative relationship with my congregation to research my preaching practice and their experience of it. I have constructed a narrative of a self-reflexive, critical examination of a single case (Gustavsen, 2003; Reason, 2003) of iterative cycles which encompass the process of co-planning and of the Word Café. My intention is to make a wider contribution to the practice of preaching by modelling ART as a dialogical, relational way of being, and to inspire other preachers and congregations to develop their own ways of reflecting on their practices and experiences of preaching the Bible in their own contexts. Arising out of my inquiry into my preaching practice is the concept of ART which has the potential to create and nurture dialogical space in the exploration and transformation of various aspects of congregational life. This is a contextual, emergent, and interdisciplinary account shaped by narratives of learning. The actions we took in attempting to create communicative space yielded the themes of a fresh hearing of the Bible, listening with my eyes, and exploring my own insider-outsider positionality, in particular through narratives of wisdom and power, silence, and affections. Central to the practice of ART is the growth of the qualities necessary for being authentic as a practitioner-researcher. I set out to demonstrate the way in which the development of attentional practices increased my awareness as I navigated the insider-outsider positionality of a preacher and researcher.
    • Addiction and Forgiveness

      Dossett, Wendy; Cook, Christopher C. H.; University of Chester; Durham University (Jessica Kingsley Publishers, 2018-09-21)
      This chapter explores the role of forgiveness in the personal stories of people in long-term recovery from addictions.
    • Addiction, spirituality and 12-step programmes

      Dossett, Wendy; University of Chester (Sage, 2013-05-01)
      Drawing on qualitative data, this article attempts to clarify the language of spirituality as used in relation to addiction and recovery. It explores what is meant by ‘spirituality’ in the context of 12-step programmes followed in the numerous anonymous mutual help groups which address the problem of addiction to a variety of substances and behaviours, and raises some of the most frequently cited problems with a ‘spiritual’ approach. It argues that wariness on the part of social workers (and other professionals) of 12-step programmes on grounds of their religious/spiritual dimension may benefit from reconsideration. It also suggests that social workers might be informed and empowered to support those individuals and families who chose to seek recovery through the 12 steps.
    • Agriculture, Floriculture and Botanical Knowledge in a Middle Bengali Text

      Ferrari, Fabrizio M.; University of Chester (Equinox Publishing, 2016-04-20)
      This chapter offers an overview of botanical lore in Śūnyapurāṇ, a heterogeneous Bengali liturgical work attributed to Rāmāi Paṇḍit. The text celebrates the god Dharmarāj, or Dharma Ṭhākur, through a lengthy cosmogonic narrative and various ritual tracts that define the practice of Dharmapūjā. After a brief introduction about the text, its authorship and date, I will discuss the use of flowers and rice in the worship of Dharmarāj in three sections: the plucking of flowers (puṣpatolān); the birth of paddy (dhānyer janma), which includes the popular tale of the farming (kr̥ṣak) Śiva, and the auspicious song of the husking pedal (ḍheṅkīmaṅgal).
    • Ahithophel (DBWC)

      Collins, Matthew A.; University of Chester (Sheffield Phoenix Press, 2012-10-22)
      Dictionary article on Ahithophel for the Dictionary of the Bible and Western Culture.
    • Ahithophel: Reception in Literature

      Collins, Matthew A.; University of Chester (De Gruyter, 2009-07-01)
      Encyclopaedia article on the reception of Ahithophel in literature.
    • Alexander Jannaeus (King of Judaea)

      Collins, Matthew A.; University of Chester (De Gruyter, 2009-06-01)
      Encyclopaedia article stub on Alexander Jannaeus.
    • All God's creatures: Reading Genesis on human and nonhuman animals

      Clough, David; University of Chester (Oxford University Press, 2009-11-01)
      This book chapter discusses reading Genesis after Darwin with specific reference to understanding the relationship between human beings and other living creatures.
    • Alternative spiritualities, new religions, and the reenchantment of the West

      Partridge, Christopher; University of Chester (Oxford University Press, 2008-07-22)
      This book chapter discusses the rise of alternative spiritualities in the West, particuarly in relation to popular culture.
    • Angels, beasts, machines, and men: Configuring the human and nonhuman in Judaeo-Christian tradition

      Clough, David; University of Chester (T&T Clark, 2008-10-01)
      This book chapter offers four snapshots from the Judaeo-Christian tradition of the theological significance of the distinction between human and nonhuman life.
    • The anxiety of the human animal: Martin Luther on non-human animals and human animality

      Clough, David; University of Chester (SCM Press, 2009-02-28)
      This book chapter discusses human superiority and dominance over other animals, human commonality with and compassion for other animals, and tensions in Luther's account of animals.
    • Apologetics without apology

      Graham, Elaine L.; University of Chester (2014-07-09)
    • Apologetics without Apology: Speaking of God in a World Troubled by Religion

      Graham, Elaine L.; University of Chester (Cascade Books, 2017-07-31)
      Against many expectations, religion has not vanished from Western culture. If anything, it exercises a greater fascination than ever before. But people are troubled and fascinated in equal measure by this new visibility of faith, not least because those who ‘speak of God in public’ are now in a minority. Society as a whole is nervous about the public engagement of faith groups and whether it is right to (re)incorporate the vocabulary of faith into our common life. This unprecedented, unanticipated, agonistic co-existence of religion and secularism is sometimes termed the ‘post-secular’, and in this book I consider some of its implications and especially for the public witness of Christianity. I argue that everyone, from Church leaders, theologians to local activists and campaigners, needs to learn again how to ‘speak Christian’ in these contexts, not just to articulate credible theological justifications for their involvement in public life but to justify the very relevance of their faith to a culture that no longer grants automatic privilege or credence. This entails a retrieval of the practice of apologetics, in terms of Christians being prepared to defend their core principles and convictions in public. An apologetics of presence involves a three-fold process of discerning the actions of God in the world, participating in the praxis of God’s mission and bearing witness to the theological convictions that underpin that praxis. Rather than being an adversarial or argumentative process, however, the apologetics of presence is an invitation to dialogue and to the rejuvenation of the vocabulary and praxis of public life, as a way of enriching our shared commitment to the common good.
    • The appropriation of information and communication technologies by the Plymouth Brethren Christian church

      Knowles, Steve; University of Chester
      This article examines why the PBCC has adopted and adapted information and communication technologies (ICTs) in their community, given that until recently they have rejected them on theological grounds. Starting by tracing the attitudes of Brethren leaders toward emerging technologies such as the radio and television, I argue that the adoption and adaptation of technology has been necessary and fundamental in maintaining the integrity of the core belief in separation from the world, a doctrine central to the Brethren way of life. Using Silverstone et al.’s notion of the moral economy of the family in relation to how Brethren negotiate their way around ICTs, I conclude that without the reconstruction and cultural appropriation of ICTs the Brethren would not be able to maintain separation from wider society.
    • Aquinas, wisdom ethics and the new genetics

      Deane-Drummond, Celia; Chester College of Higher Education (T & T Clark, 2003-02-01)
      This book chapter discusses how virtue ethics can bring a fresh approach to theological debates relating to genetics. Virtue ethics, which focuses on the agent first, rather than the possible outcomes of specific ethics problems encourages ongoing moral attention and re-examination of attitudes and beliefs.