• A call to action for climate change research on Caribbean dry forests

      Nelson, Howard P.; Devenish-Nelson, Eleanor S.; Rusk, Bonnie L.; Geary, Matthew; Lawrence, Andrew J.; Department of Biological Sciences, University of Chester; Grenada Dove Conservation Programme, St. Georges, Grenada (Springer, 2018-04-20)
      Tropical dry forest (TDF) is globally one of the most threatened forest types. In the insular Caribbean, limited land area and high population pressure have resulted in the loss of over 60% of TDF, yet local people’s reliance on these systems for ecosystem services is high. Given the sensitivity of TDF to shifts in precipitation regimes and the vulnerability of the Caribbean to climate change, this study examined what is currently known about the impacts of climate change on TDF in the region. A systematic review (n = 89) revealed that only two studies addressed the ecological response of TDF to climate change. Compared to the rapidly increasing knowledge of the effects of climate change on other Caribbean systems and on TDF in the wider neotropics, this paucity is alarming given the value of these forests. We stress the need for long-term monitoring of climate change responses of these critical ecosystems, including phenological and hotspot analyses as priorities.
    • Camera Traps Confirm the Presence of the White-naped Mangabey Cercocebus lunulatus in Cape Three Points Forest Reserve, Western Ghana

      Stanley, Christina R.; Nolan, Ryan; Welsh, Adam; Dempsey, Andrea; Mono, Joseph Cudjoe; Osei, David; Hartley, Matt; Geary, Matthew; University of Chester; West African Primate Conservation Action; The Forestry Commission of Ghana; Zoo and Wildlife Solutions Ltd (IUCN/SSC Primate Specialist Group, 2019)
      The white-naped mangabey Cercocebus lunulatus is severely threatened by logging, mining, and hunting. In the last decade, wild populations have been confirmed in just three forested areas in Ghana and a handful of sites in neighboring Côte d’Ivoire and Burkina Faso. Sightings of this species were recently reported in a fourth area in Ghana, the Cape Three Points Forest Reserve, a forest patch in western Ghana, 60 km from the nearest recorded wild population, which is in the Ankasa Conservation Area. We deployed 14 camera traps across 21 different locations throughout the reserve, with the intention of confirming the presence of this species. Images of the white-naped mangabey were captured at four locations, consolidating recent evidence for a fourth sub-population of this species in Ghana and providing only the second-ever photograph of a wild member of this species in the country. We observed evidence of numerous illegal anthropogenic activities in the reserve, which threaten these mangabeys, and we make recommendations for the protection of the reserve, essential for the conservation of this highly endangered species.
    • A Cartesian co-ordinate system for representing the second to fifth metacarpals in the human hand

      Lewis, Stephen J.; University College Chester (Elsevier, 2004-08)
      Purpose The use of hand radiographs has both clinical and anthropometric applications. However, a method for converting standard bony points within the metacarpus to Cartesian co-ordinates does not exist. Methods A simple method for converting standard bony points of the second to fifth metacarpals to Cartesian co-ordinates is described for the first time. Results Using a small set of measurements and treating these with equations of known voracity, this method is accurate and allows the metacarpus to be interro¬gated via a much wider range of geometrical techniques than has so far been available. Conclusions This method allows naked-eye assessments to be supported or re¬placed by metrical evaluations. It is likely to have both clinical and anthropometric uses.
    • Catherine Raisin

      Burek, Cynthia V.; University of Chester (The National Federation of Women's Institutes, 2011)
      This article discusses the life and career of the geologist and educational pioneer Catherine Raison (1855-1945)
    • Catherine Raisin, a role-model professional geologist

      Burek, Cynthia V. (Blackwell, 2003-05)
      This article discusses the life and career of British geologist Catherine Raisin (1855-1945), especially her time teaching at Bedford College (where she was Head of Geography, Head of Botany, and Head of Geology, and became the first woman appointed as Vice-Principal of a college in 1898).
    • CD164 identifies CD4+ T cells highly expressing genes associated with malignancy in Sezary syndrome: the Sezary signature genes, FCRL3, Tox, and miR-214.

      Benoit, Bernice M.; Jariwala, Neha; O'Connor, Geraldine M.; Oetjen, Landon; Whelan, Timothy M.; Werth, Adrienne; Troxel, Andrea B.; Sicard, Helene; Zhu, Lisa; Miller, Christopher; et al. (SpringerLink, 2016-10-20)
      Sézary syndrome (SS), a leukemic variant of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL), is associated with a significantly shorter life expectancy compared to skin-restricted mycosis fungoides. Early diagnosis of SS is, therefore, key to achieving enhanced therapeutic responses. However, the lack of a biomarker(s) highly specific for malignant CD4+ T cells in SS patients has been a serious obstacle in making an early diagnosis. We recently demonstrated the high expression of CD164 on CD4+ T cells from Sézary syndrome patients with a wide range of circulating tumor burdens. To further characterize CD164 as a potential biomarker for malignant CD4+ T cells, CD164+ and CD164−CD4+ T cells isolated from patients with high-circulating tumor burden, B2 stage, and medium/low tumor burden, B1–B0 stage, were assessed for the expression of genes reported to differentiate SS from normal controls, and associated with malignancy and poor prognosis. The expression of Sézary signature genes: T plastin, GATA-3, along with FCRL3, Tox, and miR-214, was significantly higher, whereas STAT-4 was lower, in CD164+ compared with CD164−CD4+ T cells. While Tox was highly expressed in both B2 and B1–B0 patients, the expression of Sézary signature genes, FCRL3, and miR-214 was associated predominantly with advanced B2 disease. High expression of CD164 mRNA and protein was also detected in skin from CTCL patients. CD164 was co-expressed with KIR3DL2 on circulating CD4+ T cells from high tumor burden SS patients, further providing strong support for CD164 as a disease relevant surface biomarker.
    • Changes in cervical keratinocyte gene expression associated with integration of human papillomavirus 16

      Alazawi, William; Pett, Mark; Arch, Barbara N.; Scott, Laurie; Freeman, Tom; Stanley, Margaret A.; Coleman, Nicholas; Medical Research Council Cancer Cell Unit, MRC/Hutchison Research Centre, Cambridge ; Department of Pathology, University of Cambridge ; Institute of Public Health, Cambridge ; Medical Research Council Human Genome Mapping Resource Centre, Cambridge ; Medical Research Council Human Genome Mapping Resource Centre, Cambridge ; Department of Pathology, University of Cambridge ; Medical Research Council Cancer Cell Unit, MRC/Hutchison Research Centre, Cambridge/Department of Pathology, University of Cambridge (American Association for Cancer Research, 2002-12-01)
      Episomal integration is a critical event in human papillomavirus (HPV)-related oncogenesis, although little information is currently available concerning the effect of integration on the host transcriptome. Expression microarrays were used to investigate the effect of integration of HPV16 on gene expression in cervical keratinocytes, using the unique cell line model W12. W12 was generated from a cervical low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion "naturally" infected with HPV16 and at low passage contains approximately 100 HPV16 episomes/cell. With passage in vitro, integration of viral episomes is associated with the development of phenotypic and genomic abnormalities resembling those seen in cervical neoplastic progression in vivo. The Affymetrix U95A oligonucleotide array that contains probes for 12,600 human transcripts was used and 85 genes from a range of host cell pathways that show changes in expression levels after integration of HPV16 were identified. A range of genes not previously described as being involved in cervical neoplastic progression were identified. Interestingly, integration is associated with up-regulation of numerous IFN-responsive genes, in comparison with a baseline of episomally infected cells. These genes include p48, a component of the primary regulator of the IFN response pathway, IFN-stimulated gene factor 3. The physical state of high-risk HPV may substantially influence the response to IFN in infected keratinocytes.
    • Changes in selective biomarkers after transurethral resection of the bladder tumour (TURBT), and their association with Non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) recurrence and progression

      Ella-Twongiis, Peter (University of ChesterUniversity of Chester, 2019-10-01)
      Introduction Bladder Cancer (BC) is the 10th most common cancer in the UK, with about 10,000 new cases annually. It affects more men than women (ratio 3:1). Major risk factors include tobacco, chemical carcinogens, schistosomiasis infection and age. About 75-85% of BC are non-muscle invasive (NMIBC), which is associated with high recurrence and progression rates (50-60% within 7-10 years). Currently, diagnosis, treatment and management of BC is via clinical procedures such as transurethral resection of the bladder tumour (TURBT) and endoscopy. Concerning laboratory investigations, there are no routine biomarkers currently available for identifying BC patients at increased risk of developing recurrence and progression. By monitoring changes in selective biomarkers post-TURBT, any sustained changes may be a predictor of cancer recurrence or progression. The main-focus of this research study was to evaluate changes in selective novel biomarkers and their association with recurrence and progression in BC. Materials & Methods In this research, 40 patients (n=40) scheduled for TURBT at the Wrexham Maelor Hospital, North Wales were recruited after written informed consent. Ethical approval for the project was granted via IRAS (REC4: 14/WA/0033). Venous blood samples were taken at baseline (pre-operative) and following TURBT surgery at 1, 3 and 6 months post-operatively. Bladder tumour samples were also taken during TURBT according to standard procedure. Selective biomarkers to assess inflammation, angiogenesis and tumour growth, were measured using commercially available ELISA and BioPlex multiplex assay kits. Tissue immunoreactivity of novel biomarkers were also assessed in BC tissues using immunohistochemistry, with clinical outcome measures being recorded for all patients. Results Significant increases in serum Cluster of differentiation 31 (CD31) (p=0.003) and Stem Cell Factor (SCF) (p=0.032) concentration, as well as trends of increasing concentration of serum basic Fibroblast Growth Factor (bFGF) (p=0.14), Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor-1 and 2 (VEGFR-1) (p=0.15), VEGFR-2 (p=0.15) and Follistatin (p=0.40) were observed in BC patients up to 6 months post-operative. There were also significant decreases in serum Macrophage Inflammatory Protein -2 (MIP-2) (p=0.001), Platelet Derived Growth Factor (PDGF) (p=0.012), Matrix Metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) (p=0.002) and Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor C (VEGF-C) (p=0.04) serum concentration. Trends of decreasing concentration in MMP-2 (p=0.79), MMP-3 (p=0.15), interleukin-6 (IL-6) (p=0.26), interleukin-8 (IL-8) (p=0.15) and tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) (p=0.69) were observed in BC patients up to 6 months post-operative. There was significant immunoreactivity of CD31 (p< 0.001), CD34 (p< 0.001), Human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER-2) (p=0.032), S100P (p< 0.001), Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) (p< 0.001), VEGFR-3 (p< 0.001), SOX-2 (p< 0.001) and thrombomodulin (p=0.010) in bladder tumours. Although recurrence was significantly associated with cancer grade, there was no association with antibody immunoreactivity. Conclusion Findings from the present study may indicate an alternative approach in the monitoring and management of patients with BC. It is proposed that by allowing urological surgeons access to laboratory markers such as MIP-2, MMP-9, PDGF, SCF, HER-2, Thrombomodulin and CD31 (biomarker profile), potentially, in the future, these biomarkers may be used in addition to, or in combination with, currently used scoring systems to predict cancer recurrence and progression. However, verification and validation of these biomarkers are needed using larger cohorts.
    • Chapter Ten: Handling and Restraint of Small Ruminants

      McLennan, Krista M.; Chapman, Stella; University of Chester; University Centre Hartpury (Wiley, 2017-11-03)
      Sheep (Ovis aries) were one of the first mammals to be domesticated by humans; however the exact timeline of events has been unclear. The use of mitochondrial DNA testing has recently made it possible to trace back the ancestry of many animals including cattle, horses, pigs and goats and evidence suggests that the number of wild progenitors for these species is limited; however, with the sheep this is not the case and it is thought that a large number of wild ancestral species and subspecies exist (Hiendleder et al. 2002). Archaeological findings have traced the sheep back to 11000 and 9000 BC in Mesopotamia, with the most common hypothesis being that Ovis aries descended from the Asiatic (Ovis orientalis) species of mouflon. Many studies have looked at the ancestry of sheep and there has been conflicting evidence with regards to the numbers of ancestors. It is now thought that three major groups of Eurasian wild sheep (mouflon, urial and argali) are the ancestors of the domestic sheep and it is these groups that are believed to have contributed to specific breeds (Hiendleder et al. 2002).
    • Chapter Twelve: Handling and Restraint of South American Camelids

      McLennan, Krista M.; Chapman, Stella; University of Chester; University Centre Hartpury (Wiley, 2018-01-01)
      Members of the camelid family evolved to live in arid and mountainous areas. This chapter will focus on what are known as the New World species of camelid, whose habitat mainly covers the Andes regions of South America. Four camelids can be found in South America, namely: Guanacos (Lama guanicoe), vicunas (Lama vicugna), llamas (Lama guanicoe glama) and alpacas (Vicugna pacos). The two wild forms, the guanaco and the vicuna diverged from a common ancestor approximately two million years ago; an event unrelated to domestication. Due to hybridisation the exact process of domestication has been controversial; however, recent genetic analysis has suggested that the alpaca is the domesticated form of the vicuna and the llama is the domesticated form of the guanaco (Kadwell et al. 2001). Domestication is thought to have taken place some 6000 years ago (Wheeler, 1995) when a predominant herding economy based on llama and alpaca was established at Telarmachay (a region of the Peruvian Andes). Archaeological evidence suggests that both llamas and alpacas were part of a sacrificial rite in South American culture and were key to the expansion of the Inca Empire some 500 years ago (Bonacic, 2011). Physically (apart from size) there is little difference between the llama and alpaca, which is a result of deliberate hybridisation between the two species over the past 35 years. Whilst the alpaca and llama still play an important role in their countries of origin, they are also viewed worldwide as: pets, exotic animals, livestock, zoo animals and wild animals.
    • Characterising the salt-marsh resource using multi-spectral remote sensing: A case study of the Dee estuary in north-west England

      Huckle, Jonathan M.; Marrs, Robert H.; Potter, Jacqueline; University College Chester (2004)
    • Characterization of a weakly expressed KIR2DL1 variant reveals a novel upstream promoter that controls KIR expression

      Wright, Paul W.; Li, Honchuan; Huehn, Andrew; O'Connor, Geraldine M.; Cooley, Sarah; Miller, Jeffrey S.; Anderson, Stephen K.; Basic Science Program, Leidos Biomedical Research Inc., Lab of Experimental Immunology, Frederick National Lab, Frederick, MD, USA. Cancer and Inflammation Program, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, Frederick, MD, USA. Division of Hematology, Oncology and Transplantation, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA. (Nature Publishing Group, 2014-07-03)
      Members of the human KIR (killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor) class I major histocompatibility complex receptor gene family contain multiple promoters that determine the variegated expression of KIR on natural killer cells. In order to identify novel genetic alterations associated with decreased KIR expression, a group of donors was characterized for KIR gene content, transcripts and protein expression. An individual with a single copy of the KIR2DL1 gene but a very low level of gene expression was identified. The low expression phenotype was associated with a single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) that created a binding site for the inhibitory ZEB1 (Zinc finger E-box-binding homeobox 1) transcription factor adjacent to a c-Myc binding site previously implicated in distal promoter activity. Individuals possessing this SNP had a substantial decrease in distal KIR2DL1 transcripts initiating from a novel intermediate promoter located 230 bp upstream of the proximal promoter start site. Surprisingly, there was no decrease in transcription from the KIR2DL1 proximal promoter. Reduced intermediate promoter activity revealed the existence of alternatively spliced KIR2DL1 transcripts containing premature termination codons that initiated from the proximal KIR2DL1 promoter. Altogether, these results indicate that distal transcripts are necessary for KIR2DL1 protein expression and are required for proper processing of sense transcripts from the bidirectional proximal promoter.
    • Clapping in chimpanzees: Evidence of exclusive hand preference in a spontaneous, bimanual gesture

      Fletcher, Alison W.; University of Chester (Wiley-Blackwell, 2006-10-16)
      This article presents data on a simple, spontaneous bimanual gesture –'clap'– that was investigated in a naturalistic group of 26 chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes).
    • The classification and management of limestone pavements - an endangered habitat

      Burek, Cynthia V.; Alexander, Roy; Thom, Tim; Willis, Sue D. M. (University of Liverpool (University of Chester), 2011-01)
      This thesis describes an in-depth study of limestone pavements across North West England and North Wales. The aim was to combine elements of geodiversity and biodiversity in order to create a holistic limestone pavement classification to inform future management. A field-based research protocol was used to assess a stratified random sample (46 pavements), accounting for approximately 10% of the limestone pavements in the geographical area. Detailed analyses of key elements are presented, along with important issues that continue to pose threats to this Annex One Priority Habitat. This research resulted in a comprehensive classification, using TWINSPAN analysis and Nonmetric Multidimensional Scaling, identifying six distinct holistic functional groups. The prime factors driving limestone pavement morphology, and hence the classification, were established to be lithology, proximity to structural fault, altitude and human intervention, particularly in terms of grazing intensity. Three upland, open limestone pavement classes were formed. Of these, the richest in terms of geodiversity and biodiversity was the group with the thickest bedding planes and hence the deepest grikes, typically greater than 1m. The class that was most species-poor was "at the highest altitude (above 450m), formed on the thin limestones of the Yoredales. These were characterised by shallow, wide grikes. The third upland limestone pavement group had mid-range grikes, generally 0.5-1m in depth, and small clints. Two wooded classes were identified. One was a lowland 'classic' wooded limestone pavement group with deep, narrow grikes and shallow soils. Indicator species included Juniperus communis and Taxus baccata. The second wooded group was situated proximal to a major structural fault. In this group the pavement dip ranged between 10°-40° with well-runnelled clints that were heavily moss-covered. The sixth group was low altitude, proximal to the coast, characterised by low moss growth, un-vegetated clints and the presence of Ulex europaeus. Conservation management was identified as key to the quality of the limestone pavement habitat and this thesis identifies best management practises and links these to the holistic limestone pavement classification. Finally, as a sample case study, this thesis presents mollusc species and diversity from eleven of the Yorkshire limestone pavements. Analysis establishes significant links between geodiversity and mollusc populations, with key drivers for mollusc communities echoing those of plant species on limestone pavement.
    • Cleaner wrasse forage on ectoparasitic Digeneans (Phylum Platyhelminthes) that infect pelagic thresher sharks (Alopias pelagicus)

      Cadwallader, Helen F.; Turner, J. R.; Oliver, Simon P.; Bangor University; University of Chester (Springer, 2014-12-03)
      This article discusses a study of ectoparasite specimens that were taken from the cloacas of dead pelagic thresher sharks caught in the central Visayas of the Philippines.
    • Colonisation and development of salt mark in the Dee estuary, NW England: Integrating large-scale pattern and small-scale ecological process

      Marrs, Robert H.; Potter, Jacqueline; Huckle, Jonathan M. (University of Liverpool (Chester College of Higher Education), 2000-07)
      The Dee estuary, one of the most important British estuaries in terms of size and conservation value, has been subject to extensive colonisation and development of intertidal mudflats by salt marsh vegetation. In the last century, acceleration of this process has been attributed to the ability of Spartina anglica C.E. Hubbard to colonise bare sediment. The research in this thesis aims to investigate the ecological patterns and processes involved in the development of salt marsh vegetation. These have been examined using a large-scale approach involving remote sensing techniques and a small-scale approach to examine ecological processes at the level of the individual plant and species. Large-scale temporal patterns in the distribution were investigated by analysing a sequence of monochrome aerial photographs dating from 1955 to 1997. At the marsh apex, initial rapid colonisation was followed by a decreased rate of expansion and a reduction in the pioneer zone. This suggested a steepening of the marsh elevation gradient, which is interpreted as the marsh approaching its natural limit of expansion. The rate of salt marsh expansion was consistent across the time sequence for the second target area, a cross-section of the marsh gradient, but with S. a«g/zca-dominated colonisation of mudflats changing to colonisation by a pioneer community co-dominated by S. anglica and Salicornia europaea. Large-scale spatial distribution patterns were further investigated using multispectral remote sensing data from 1997. Radiometric data were used to define the spectral characteristics of the major types of salt marsh vegetation. Airborne Thematic Mapper data were used to classify the reflectance data from the whole marsh to determine the spatial distribution of plant communities based on their spectral characteristics. Mapping of these communities provided a baseline that will be a useful tool for future management of the salt marsh. An experimental approach was used to examine the role of abiotic and biotic factors on the growth and interactions between S. anglica and Puccinellia maritima (Huds.) Parl. In two series of competition experiments, P. maritima exerted a one¬way effect over S. anglica. The intensity of this interaction was increased in environmental conditions favourable to P. maritima, and was greater in terms of above-ground than below-ground biomass. In both experiments, S. anglica exhibited a disproportionate reduction in below-ground competitive interaction in abiotic conditions less favourable to P. maritima. A corresponding increase in rhizomes suggested that this is a potential mechanism by which S. anglica may evade competitive neighbours at low marsh elevations. An appreciation of the importance of scale has led to a multi-scaled and holistic view of the ecological process of salt marsh colonisation and development. Integration of both large and small-scale approaches has provided valuable information on the ecological patterns and processes, and has important implications for current and future management of salt marsh in the Dee estuary.
    • Combining bioacoustics and occupancy modelling for improved monitoring of rare breeding bird populations

      Abrahams, Carlos; Geary, Matthew; Baker Consultants Ltd; Nottingham Trent University; University of Chester
      Effective monitoring of rare and declining species is critical to enable their conservation, but can often be difficult due to detectability or survey constraints. However, developments in acoustic recorders are enabling an important new approach for improved monitoring that is especially applicable for long-term studies, and for use in difficult environments or with cryptic species. Bioacoustic data may be effectively analysed within an occupancy modelling framework, as presence/absence can be determined, and repeated survey events can be accommodated. Hence, both occupancy and detectability estimates can be produced from large, coherent datasets. However, the most effective methods for the practical detection and identification of call data are still far from established. We assessed a novel combination of automated clustering and manual verification to detect and identify heathland bird vocalizations, covering a period of six days at 44 sampling locations Occupancy (Ψ) and detectability (p ) were modelled for each species, and the best fit models provided values of: nightjar Ψ=0.684, p=0.740, Dartford warbler Ψ=0.449 p=0.196 and woodlark Ψ=0.13 p=0.996. Including environmental covariates within the occupancy models indicated that tree, wetland and heather cover were important variables, particularly influencing detectability. The protocol used here allowed robust and consistent survey data to be gathered, with limited fieldwork resourcing, allowing population estimates to be generated for the target bird species. The combination of bioacoustics and occupancy modelling can provide a valuable new monitoring approach, allowing population trends to be identified, and the effects of environmental change and site management to be assessed.
    • Community food initatives and public health

      Ellahi, Basma; University of Chester (SAGE, 2008-11-20)
      This book chapter discusses community-based food initiatives to improve nutrition-related health.
    • The complete mitochondrial genome and phylogenetic position of the critically endangered Trinidad Piping Guan, Pipile pipile synonym Aburria pipile (Aves: Galliformes).

      Grass, Amelia; Hosie, Charlotte A.; McDowall, Ian; University of Chester (Taylor & Francis, 2016-09-04)
      The complete mitochondrial genome of the Critically Endangered Trinidad Piping Guan, Pipile pipile (Jacquin 1784) synonym Aburria pipile was sequenced for the first time in this study. The genome is 16,665 bp in length with overall base compositions of 30.1, 23.7, 32.3 and 13.9% for A, T, C, and G, respectively. Structurally, the P. pipile mitogenome is comparable to that of other Galliformes, thereby demonstrating typical avian gene organization. The mitogenome was subsequently used to produce a revised phylogenetic placement of P. pipile within the Galliforme order, positioning the Pipile genus basal within the Cracidae family. It is further envisaged that this novel genomic data will contribute to a wider understanding of genetic relationships within the genus Pipile and the analysis of the evolutionary relationships of the Galliforme order in a wider avian context.
    • Conceptual and methodological issues relating to pain assessment in mammals: the development and utilisation of pain facial expression scales.

      McLennan, Krista M.; Miller, Amy, L.; Dalla Costa, Emanuela; Stucke, Diana; Corke, Murray J.; Broom, Donald M.; Leach, Matthew C.; University of Chester; Newcastle University; c Università degli Studi di Milano; Havelland Equine Clinic; University of Cambridge (Elsevier, 2019-06-12)
      Effective management of pain is critical to the improvement of animal welfare. For this to happen, pain must be recognised and assessed in a variety of contexts. Pain is a complex phenomenon, making reliable, valid, and feasible measurement challenging. The use of facial expressions as a technique to assess pain in non-verbal human patients has been widely utilised for many years. More recently this technique has been developed for use in a number of non-human species: rodents, rabbits, ferrets, cats, sheep, pigs and horses. Facial expression scoring has been demonstrated to provide an effective means of identifying animal pain and in assessing its severity, overcoming some of the limitations of other measures for pain assessment in animals. However, there remain limitations and challenges to the use of facial expression as a welfare assessment tool which must be investigated. This paper reviews current facial expression pain scales (“Grimace Scales"), discussing the general conceptual and methodological issues faced when assessing pain, and highlighting the advantages of using facial expression scales over other pain assessment methods. We provide guidance on how facial expression scales should be developed so as to be valid and reliable, but we also provide guidance on how they should be used in clinical practice.