• Supporting nursing students from diverse cultural backgrounds.

      Wiredu, Immanuel; Roberts, Debbie; email: debbie.roberts@chester.ac.uk (2020-07-30)
    • Interaction between Metabolic Genetic Risk Score and Dietary Fatty Acid Intake on Central Obesity in a Ghanaian Population

      Alsulami, Sooad; Nyakotey, David; Dudek, Kamila; Bawah, Abdul-Malik; Lovegrove, Julie; Annan, Reggie; Ellahi, Basma; Karani, Santhanakrishnan Vimaleswaran; University of Reading, University of Chester and Kumasi University (MDPI, 2020-07-27)
      Obesity is a multifactorial condition arising from the interaction between genetic and lifestyle factors. We aimed to assess the impact of lifestyle and genetic factors on obesity-related traits in 302 healthy Ghanaian adults. Dietary intake and physical activity were assessed using a 3 day repeated 24 h dietary recall and global physical activity questionnaire, respectively. Twelve single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were used to construct 4-SNP, 8-SNP and 12-SNP genetic risk scores (GRSs). The 4-SNP GRS showed significant interactions with dietary fat intakes on waist circumference (WC) (Total fat, Pinteraction = 0.01; saturated fatty acids (SFA), Pinteraction = 0.02; polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), Pinteraction = 0.01 and monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA), Pinteraction = 0.01). Among individuals with higher intakes of total fat (>47 g/d), SFA (>14 g/d), PUFA (>16 g/d) and MUFA (>16 g/d), individuals with ≥3 risk alleles had a significantly higher WC compared to those with <3 risk alleles. This is the first study of its kind in this population, suggesting that a higher consumption of dietary fatty acid may have the potential to increase the genetic susceptibility of becoming centrally obese. These results support the general dietary recommendations to decrease the intakes of total fat and SFA, to reduce the risk of obesity, particularly in individuals with a higher genetic predisposition to central obesity.
    • A systematic review of the organizational, environmental, professional and child and family factors influencing the timing of admission to hospital for children with serious infectious illness

      editor: Ho, Jacqueline J.; Carter, Bernie; orcid: 0000-0001-5226-9878; email: bernie.carter@edgehill.ac.uk; Roland, Damian; orcid: 0000-0001-9334-5144; Bray, Lucy; Harris, Jane; orcid: 0000-0001-6584-1642; Pandey, Poornima; Fox, Jo; Carrol, Enitan D.; Neill, Sarah; orcid: 0000-0001-9699-078X (Public Library of Science, 2020-07-23)
      Background: Infection, particularly in the first 5 years of life, is a major cause of childhood deaths globally, many deaths from infections such as pneumonia and meningococcal disease are avoidable, if treated in time. Some factors that contribute to morbidity and mortality can be modified. These include organisational and environmental factors as well as those related to the child, family or professional. Objective: Examine what organizational and environmental factors and individual child, family and professional factors affect timing of admission to hospital for children with a serious infectious illness. Design: Systematic review. Data sources: Key search terms were identified and used to search CINAHL Plus, Medline, ASSIA, Web of Science, The Cochrane Library, Joanna Briggs Institute Database of Systematic Review. Study appraisal methods: Primary research (e.g. quantitative, qualitative and mixed methods studies) and literature reviews (e.g., systematic, scoping and narrative) were included if participants included or were restricted to children under 5 years of age with serious infectious illnesses, included parents and/or first contact health care professionals in primary care, urgent and emergency care and where the research had been conducted in OECD high income countries. The Mixed Methods Appraisal Tool was used to review the methodological quality of the studies. Main findings: Thirty-six papers were selected for full text review; 12 studies fitted the inclusion criteria. Factors influencing the timing of admission to hospital included the variability in children’s illness trajectories and pathways to hospital, parental recognition of symptoms and clinicians non-recognition of illness severity, parental help-seeking behaviour and clinician responses, access to services, use and non-use of ‘gut feeling’ by clinicians, and sub-optimal management within primary, secondary and tertiary services. Conclusions: The pathways taken by children with a serious infectious illness to hospital are complex and influenced by a variety of potentially modifiable individual, organisational, environmental and contextual factors. Supportive, accessible, respectful services that provide continuity, clear communication, advice and safety-netting are important as is improved training for clinicians and a mandate to attend to ‘gut feeling’. Implications: Relatively simple interventions such as improved communication have the potential to improve the quality of care and reduce morbidity and mortality in children with a serious infectious illness.
    • Cost of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis in Europe and the USA: The GAIN study.

      O'Hara, Jamie; Finnegan, Alan; Dhillon, Harpal; Ruiz-Casas, Leonardo; Pedra, Gabriel; Franks, Bethany; Morgan, George; Hebditch, Vanessa; Jönsson, Bengt; Mabhala, Mzwandile; et al. (2020-07-15)
      Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) leads to cirrhosis and is associated with a substantial socioeconomic burden, which, coupled with rising prevalence, is a growing public health challenge. However, there are few real-world data available describing the impact of NASH. The Global Assessment of the Impact of NASH (GAIN) study is a prevalence-based burden of illness study across Europe (France, Germany, Italy, Spain, and the UK) and the USA. Physicians provided demographic, clinical, and economic patient information via an online survey. In total, 3,754 patients found to have NASH on liver biopsy were stratified by fibrosis score and by biomarkers as either early or advanced fibrosis. Per-patient costs were estimated using national unit price data and extrapolated to the population level to calculate the economic burden. Of the patients, 767 (20%) provided information on indirect costs and health-related quality of life using the EuroQOL 5-D (EQ-5D; n = 749) and Chronic Liver Disease Questionnaire - Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (CLDQ-NAFLD) (n = 723). Mean EQ-5D and CLDQ-NAFLD index scores were 0.75 and 4.9, respectively. For 2018, the mean total annual per patient cost of NASH was €2,763, €4,917, and €5,509 for direct medical, direct non-medical, and indirect costs, respectively. National per-patient cost was highest in the USA and lowest in France. Costs increased with fibrosis and decompensation, driven by hospitalisation and comorbidities. Indirect costs were driven by work loss. The GAIN study provides real-world data on the direct medical, direct non-medical, and indirect costs associated with NASH, including patient-reported outcomes in Europe and the USA, showing a substantial burden on health services and individuals. There has been little research into the socioeconomic burden associated with non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). The GAIN study provides real-world data on the direct medical, direct non-medical, and indirect costs associated with NASH, including patient-reported outcomes in five European countries (UK, France, Germany, Spain, and Italy) and the USA. Mean total annual per patient cost of NASH was estimated at €2,763, €4,917, and €5,509 for the direct medical, direct non-medical, and indirect cost categories, respectively. [Abstract copyright: © 2020 The Author(s).]
    • Stigma: the representation of anorexia nervosa in UK newspaper Twitter feeds.

      Bowen, Matt; Lovell, Andrew; Waller, Rhian; University of Chester (Taylor and Francis, 2020-07-15)
      Background There is evidence that the representation of mental health in newspapers has an influence on readers’ attitudes, however, relatively little is known about how the industry presents accounts of anorexia nervosa. Further, the industry increasingly uses Twitter as a medium for reaching readers and this remains an under-examined area of research. Aims To explore the representation of anorexia nervosa in the UK national press’ Twitter feeds. Method Frame analysis was used to examine the manner in which anorexia nervosa was represented in the Twitter feeds of all national UK newspapers between 2009-2019 (n=332). This qualitative approach used Braun and Clarke’s stages of thematic analysis, while drawing on Van Gorp’s use of a frame matrix to support the definition of the news frames. Results The analysis identified four news frames: social model, illness model, stress-recovery model and clickbait model. Conclusions The newspapers drew on a range of perspectives in their representation of anorexia nervosa, which typically were not stigmatising in their accounts. However, there was a pattern of using sensationalistic images in some of the tweets, which may encourage readers to view people with anorexia nervosa as Other, and as a consequence contribute to stigmatisation.
    • The perceived psychological stressors and coping behaviours in university students, on a pre-registration programme.

      Mitchell, Andrew E. P.; University of Chester (Emerald Publishing, 2020-05-20)
      The purpose was to investigate perceived stressors and coping behaviours in student nurses on a pre-registration programme of study. Stress in student nurses has been identified with decreased emotional well-being and poor academic achievement. The significance of stress and coping behaviours in students during training has implications for education and practice. The present study recruited eighty seven pre-registration student nurses in a cross sectional design. Bivariate and multivariate analyses assessed the differences in field and year of study and the students’ perceived stress and coping behaviours. The findings showed that stress is a significant issue in nurse training. Fifty-three percent of the participants had levels higher than the mean. Interestingly, the present study found that high perceived stress was associated with avoidance behaviours. The most common type of perceived stress and ranked by highest factor were from written assignments and a lack of professional skills and knowledge. Their peer group and everyday life activities were shown as potential ways of coping with stressors. Thus, it seems reasonable to focus support on decreasing avoidant and enhancing stress-reducing behaviours. Psychological stress and coping behaviours must be considered together as perceived stress is bound by the ability to ameliorate stress by managing helpful and unhelpful behaviours. The findings may suggest that a potential benefit could come from the provision of helpful strategies such as peer group support and reduction of avoidant behaviours. Also, there seems to be a need for greater mental health literacy in dealing with stress during training.
    • Understanding minimum and ideal factor levels for participation in physical activities by people with haemophilia: An expert elicitation exercise.

      Martin, Antony P; orcid: 0000-0003-4383-6038; Burke, Tom; Asghar, Sohaib; Noone, Declan; Pedra, Gabriel; orcid: 0000-0002-2023-5224; O'Hara, Jamie (2020-04-08)
      The benefits of physical activity (PA) for people with haemophilia (PWH) may include improvements in joint, bone and muscle health. However, the factor VIII activity level required to avoid a bleeding episode associated with PA is unknown. To elicit the opinion of clinical experts on the minimum level and ideal factor VIII activity ('level') required to avoid a bleeding episode during participation in different types of PA for PWH. Based on the 2017 National Hemophilia Foundation PA descriptions, clinical experts estimated a minimally acceptable and an ideal factor level at which a bleed could be avoided. The uncertainty around estimates was quantified using an approach to construct a probability distribution to represent expert opinion. Minimum and ideal factor level increased with higher risk PA, whether or not joint morbidity was present, as did the experts' uncertainty in their estimates (ie the range between lowest and highest estimates for minimum and ideal levels). Mean minimum levels ranged from 4% to 48% for low to high risk for people without joint morbidity, and from 7% to 47% for those with joint morbidity. For ideal factor levels, corresponding figures were 9%-52% and 12%-64%, respectively. To support a patient-centric outcome, expert opinion indicates that the clinical norm of 0.01 IU/mL (1%) trough level is insufficient. It is anticipated that introducing a more targeted approach to meet the needs of patients who are increasingly physically active will benefit patients further in addition to recent treatment advances. [Abstract copyright: © 2020 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.]
    • The value of embedded secondary-care-based psychology services in rheumatology: an exemplar for long-term conditions

      Barnes, Theresa; Taylor, Lou; Eost-Telling, Charlotte; Joy, Thomas; Countess of Chester Hospital; University of Chester; University of Chester; Cheshire and Wirral Partnership (Royal College of Physicians, 2020-02-29)
      Rheumatoid arthritis is an exemplar long term condition, complicated by pain, disability, co-morbidities and long term medication use. It has significant effects on mobility, work performance, social role, sexual function and relationships. It is commonly associated with fatigue and mood disturbance as a result of complex interactions of physical (disease related) and psychosocial factors. NICE guidance recommends the availability of psychological support for these patients. We have implemented a psychology service for our patients with chronic rheumatological conditions. This study was set up to capture the value of this service.
    • A phenomenological exploration of nursing students’ experience of raising a care concern in clinical practice

      Cooper, Elizabeth (University of ChesterUniversity of Chester, 2020-01)
      UK pre-registration healthcare students are expected to raise a care concern about unsafe situations whilst in clinical practice. The UK’s NHS is in the midst of a change to an open, honest and transparent culture which responds to a professional’s concern about patient care, to improve safety and prevent harm. Central to this change is improving the experience of registered healthcare professionals whose decision to raise a care concern is influenced by the organisational culture; this can create a difficult moral choice. The experience of nursing students who decide to raise a care concern has received little attention, and this study sought to explore this under-researched area. A literature review was undertaken which identified that the experience of nursing students who had raised a care concern had not been previously examined. To guide this study, Clarke Moustakas’ (1994) transcendental phenomenological methodology was used to explore nursing students’ lived experience of raising a care concern. Ten nursing students with experience of raising a care concern in clinical practice voluntarily participated in the study. Open interviews conducted between December 2016 and October 2017 were audio recorded and transcribed, exposing individual narratives of raising a care concern in clinical practice. The transcripts were analysed to produce a composite description which summarises nursing students’ lived experience, reflecting four themes or essences: 1) patient centred concern; 2) deciding how to act; 3) having emotional strength; and 4) feedback and support. These typify what it is like for nursing students to raise a care concern whilst in clinical practice. The findings were critically examined and suggest that compassion may motivate nursing students to act when faced with an unsafe situation, seeking to stop patient harm and suffering. Recognising this moral motivation, students described the relevance of emotional strength when dealing with the emotionally complex experience of facing difficult situations, with feedback and support providing comfort plus moral and emotional satisfaction. This study also explores the implications for professional practice, specifically the impact upon future teaching and learning approaches to facilitate nursing students’ ability to detect and act upon unsafe situations; providing listening opportunities to support students in clinical practice; and valuing nursing students who raise a care concern as role models and local clinical leaders. Recommendations include a new national campaign to improve the likelihood of nursing students raising care concerns and updating UK professional guidance.
    • Using and developing evidence in health and social care practice

      Chapman, Hazel M.; University of Chester (Sage, 2020)
      [A] Overview This chapter outlines the processes of developing evidence-based practice and carrying out research and highlights the similarities and differences between the two. This chapter aims to increase your skills and motivation in utilising research evidence to improve your practice, introduce you to the process of research and develop your research skills. [A] Learning Outcomes At the end of this chapter you will be able to: • Critique research papers. • Share best practice with your colleagues. • Assist with research in practice. • Develop your research skills with a view to becoming a researcher.
    • Exploring the staff development needs of junior academic middle managers in a Faculty of Health and Social Care during organisational change: A Bourdieusian perspective.

      Evers, Jean L (University of ChesterUniversity of Chester, 2019-12)
      The aim of this study was to gain an in-depth understanding of the personal and professional staff development needs of junior academic middle managers in a Faculty of Health and Social Care during a period of change. The research was undertaken in the North West of England in a post-1992 University, following a reorganisation of the Faculty of Health and Social Care and introduction of new roles. The study adopted an action research methodology and a co-operative inquiry method, which consisted of a co-operative inquiry group of junior academic middle managers who were also co-researchers. The nature of co-operative inquiry is for co -researchers to engage in repeated cycles of reflection and action that generate changes to their professional practice. The study was conducted over a period of one year and during this time multiple data collection methods were utilised to triangulate the evidence. The research findings identified that multiple identities caused conflict between professional and academic roles, negatively impacting on junior academic middle managers during periods of change. During transition, some participants reported difficulty in adapting to complex political reforms, which caused dissonance between their actual and perceived roles in the field. The junior academic middle managers reported that the safe and trusting environment of the co-operative inquiry group enhanced their confidence and enabled them to learn in action and acquire a reflexive approach when undertaking their roles in the newly structured organisation. The study contributes to the existing literature regarding role identity of professional academics in higher education and offers new insights into transition during complex organisational change.
    • Being at the Bottom Rung of the Ladder in an Unequal Society: A Qualitative Analysis of Stories of People without a Home

      Mabhala, Mzwandile A.; Yohannes, Asmait; Asmait Skin Care (MDPI, 2019-11-21)
      Background: Homelessness is rising in the United Kingdom, despite investment in measures to eradicate it made by the government and charity organisations. Aim: The aim is to examine the stories of homeless people in order to document their perceptions of their social status, the reasons that led to their homelessness, and propose a conceptual explanation. Method: We conducted 26 semi-structured interviews in three centres for homeless people in Cheshire, North West of England. Results: Three categories—education, employment, and health—emerged from the data and provided a theoretical explanation for the reasons that led to their homelessness. These are vital not only for the successful negotiation of one’s way out of homelessness, but also for achieving other social goods, including social connections, social mobility, and engaging in positive social relationships. Conclusion: Participants catalogued the adverse childhood experiences, which they believe limited their capacity to meaningfully engage with the social institution for social goods, such as education, social services, and institutions of employment. Since not all people who have misfortunes of poor education, poor health, and loss of job end up being homeless, we contend that a combination of these with multiple adverse childhood experiences may have weakened their resilience to traumatic life changes, such as loss of job and poor health.
    • The clusters and frequencies of adverse social conditions amongst the homeless people

      Mabhala, Mzwandile A. (Oxford University Press (OUP), 2019-11-13)
      Abstract Background A growing body of evidence identifies interconnected social indicators that can lead to homelessness. Several studies identify a catalogue of social disadvantages that starts from childhood and persist throughout the life course that leads to homelessness. Qualitative evidence indicates that their adverse childhood experiences(ACEs) and damage that occurred to them as children had major influences on their ability to negotiate their way through the education system, gain and sustain employment, make appropriate choices of social networks, and form and maintain healthy relationships as adults. However, very little research seeks to objectively investigate these issues. This study aims to use the cross-sectional study to document the cluster and frequency of adverse social conditions amongst the homeless people in North West England in 2019. Methods The study design was cross-sectional. We used IBM SPSS 21, with a significance level set at p &lt; 0.05, CI 95% to analyse the data. Results The mean age was 39.12, range 21-64, 90.5% male. 52%(χ2= 33.4, df = 1, p = 0.001) described their health as poor, 90% (χ2= 61.85, df = 2, p = 0.001) smoked cigarette daily, 83.3% (χ2= 76.4, df = 3, p = 0.001) used drugs daily, 78.6% (χ2= 13.7, df = 1, p = 0.001) saw a doctor in preceding 6 months, 63.4% (χ2= 73.8, df = 3, p = 0.001) left school before age 16; 26.2% (χ2= 37.7, df = 3, p = 0.001) left school at 16, 11.9% (χ2= 33.1, df = 10, p = 0.001) encounterd criminal justice system at the age of 11, 28.6% (χ2= 60.8, df = 8, p = 0.001) had reprimand/caution or conviction at 17. ACES: 57% (χ2= 34.7, df = 3, p = 0.001) experienced humiliation by adults in their household; 54% (χ2= 30.7, df = 3, p = 0.001) threatening behaviour, 50% (χ2= 26.0, df = 3, p = 0.001) physical violence in their household. Conclusions These early stage preliminary results indicate that adverse social circumstances that occur in childhood are disproportionately represented in homeless population. Key messages Homelessness is more complex than the absence of accomodation. Adverse social circumstances that occur in childhood are disproportionately represented in homeless population.
    • Prophylactic Treatment in People with Severe Hemophilia B in the US: An Analysis of Real-World Healthcare System Costs and Clinical Outcomes

      Noone, Declan; Pedra, Gabriel; Asghar, Sohaib; O'Hara, Jamie; Sawyer, Eileen K; Li, Nanxin (Nick) (American Society of Hematology, 2019-11-13)
      Introduction The treatment paradigm for people with severe hemophilia B in the US typically involves prophylaxis with factor IX (FIX) replacement therapy, the primary aim of which is to provide sufficient FIX levels to reduce the frequency of bleeding events. The clinical benefits of FIX prophylaxis are well understood, however the cost of FIX products as well as costs associated with healthcare resource utilization present a significant burden to the healthcare system. Substantive costs may also accrue in patients who continue to bleed while on prophylaxis, due to the impact on both short and long-term joint-related outcomes. In the absence of existing data in the US, the 'Cost of Hemophilia Across the USA: a Socioeconomic Survey' (CHESS US) study was conducted to establish a population-based estimate of the real-world US healthcare system burden associated with severe hemophilia. Using data drawn from the CHESS US study, this analysis examines the real-world healthcare system costs and clinical outcomes of people with severe hemophilia B on FIX prophylaxis. Methods CHESS US, a retrospective, cross-sectional dataset of adults with severe hemophilia in the USA, gathered information on patient cost via a patient record form. Data on the following parameters are included in this analysis: FIX consumption, annualized bleeding rate (ABR), the presence of one or more chronically damaged joints ("problem joint"), as well as costs associated with annual (prophylactic) factor consumption and hospitalizations (i.e., number of admissions, number of day cases, total inpatient days, and total intensive care unit [ICU] days). All variables report retrospective data of the 12 months prior to enrolment in the study. Results are presented as mean (± standard deviation) or N (%). Results In total, 132 of 576 patients profiled in the CHESS US study had severe hemophilia B. Among them, 77 patients were on FIX prophylaxis, of whom 44 patients reported FIX dosing regimen and were included in the current analyses. Among them, 20 patients were treated with conventional FIX and 24 patients with extended half-life (EHL) FIX products. The cohort has a mean age of 27.64 (± 11.05) and mean weight (kg) of 75.71 (± 13.41). In the last 12 months, the mean number of international units (IU) prescribed for FIX prophylaxis across the full cohort was 257,216 IU (± 213,591), with an associated annual cost of $610,966 (± $495,869). Among patients treated with conventional FIX, mean prescribed FIX was 287,141 IU (± 264,906) at an annual cost of $397,491 (± $359,788), while patients treated with EHL FIX reported a mean prescribed FIX of 232,278 IU (± 160,914) at an annual cost of $788,861 (± $529,258). The cohort reported a mean ABR of 1.73 (± 1.39); 8 (18%) were reported to have a target joint meeting the International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis (ISTH) definition; and 11% were reported to have had at least one chronically damaged joint (i.e., problem joint). Healthcare resource utilization associated with bleed events were reported as follows: hospital admissions days [0.18 (± 0.62)]; inpatient days [0.34 (± 1.22)]; and ICU days [0.23 (± 0.86)]. The direct medical cost to the healthcare system was $2,885 (± $7,857; excluding FIX cost) and $614,886 (± $498,839; including FIX cost). Discussion Data from the CHESS US study showed substantial costs and resource utilization among patients with severe hemophilia B receiving FIX prophylaxis, of which the cost of FIX replacement therapy constituted most of the total cost to healthcare system. Although the ABR observed in the analysis population was low, bleed-related hospitalizations comprised a significant non-drug cost to the healthcare system. A proportion of patients also still experienced joint arthropathy. Such substantial clinical and economic burden highlights that unmet needs remain in patients with severe hemophilia B on FIX prophylaxis in the US. Disclosures Noone: HCD Economics: Employment. Pedra:HCD Economics: Employment. Asghar:HCD Economics: Employment. O'Hara:HCD Economics: Employment, Equity Ownership. Sawyer:uniQure Inc.: Employment. Li:uniQure Inc.: Employment.
    • Achieving the unimaginable: Health equity in haemophilia

      Skinner, Mark W.; orcid: 0000-0002-0934-0680; Nugent, Diane; Wilton, Pam; O’Mahony, Brian; Dolan, Gerry; O’Hara, Jamie; Berntorp, Erik; orcid: 0000-0002-1337-7195 (Wiley, 2019-11-13)
    • Achieving the unimaginable: Health equity in haemophilia

      Skinner, Mark W.; orcid: 0000-0002-0934-0680; Nugent, Diane; Wilton, Pam; O’Mahony, Brian; Dolan, Gerry; O’Hara, Jamie; Berntorp, Erik; orcid: 0000-0002-1337-7195 (Wiley, 2019-11-13)
    • Achieving the unimaginable: Health equity in haemophilia

      Skinner, Mark W.; orcid: 0000-0002-0934-0680; Nugent, Diane; Wilton, Pam; O’Mahony, Brian; Dolan, Gerry; O’Hara, Jamie; Berntorp, Erik; orcid: 0000-0002-1337-7195 (Wiley, 2019-11-13)
    • Mental health services in Cambodia: an overview.

      Parry, Sarah J; orcid: 0000-0002-9730-3547; email: sarah316103@gmail.com; Wilkinson, Ewan (2019-11-13)
      Mental health services in Cambodia required rebuilding in their entirety after their destruction during conflict in the 1970s. During the late 1990s there was rapid growth and development of professional mental health training and education. Currently, basic mental healthcare is available primarily in urban areas and is provided by a mixture of government, non-government and private services. Despite the initial rapid growth of services and the development of a national mental health strategy in 2010, significant challenges remain in achieving an acceptable, standardised level of mental healthcare nationally. [Abstract copyright: © The Authors 2019.]
    • PERCEPTIONS OF DEMENTIA

      Kingston, Paul; Taylor, Louise; Eost-Telling, Charlotte; Bailey, and Jan (Oxford University Press (OUP), 2019-11-08)
      Abstract This paper considers narratives of 143 respondents (“Observers”) to a Mass Observation Project Directive exploring individuals’ perceptions of dementia. Perceptions of dementia held by “Observers” with experience of dementia and those without differed sharply. “Observers” with experience of dementia offered insight into living with and caring for a person with dementia, and the impact this had on their lives and personal relationships. Whereas, “Observers” with no direct experience of dementia focused more on common disease symptoms such as memory loss and reflected idealised views of care. “Observers” often feared being diagnosed with dementia themselves. This suggests education to facilitate care planning and ameliorate fears held by the public is required.
    • PERSONAL NARRATIVES OF AGING.

      Taylor, Louise; Bailey, Jan; Kingston, Paul; Eost-Telling, Charlotte (2019-11-08)
      AbstractThis presentation reflects on self-written narratives from respondents to a mass observation directive, focusing on the experiences of growing older. Narrative methods are theoretically and methodologically diverse, and are helpful in social research to understand events or happenings in human lives. This data presents accounts from a heterogeneous sample in the form of self-penned responses. These experience-centred narratives bring stories of personal understanding into being by means of the first person description of past, present, future or imaginary experiences. This presentation will focus on the findings with reference to physical and mental impacts, both real and anticipated. We will also explore themes arising from the data including gender differences, age-cohort effects and stigma. The data can be used to inform Health and Social Care education and practice, particularly in co-producing appropriate person-centred services with older people.