• Do health consultations for people with learning disabilities meet expectations? A narrative literature review

      Chapman, Hazel M.; Lovell, Andy; Bramwell, Ros; University of Chester (Wiley, 2018-04-06)
      Aim: To explore the benefits and disadvantages of annual health checks for people with learning disabilities, including: • What are the rationales and outcome measures for health checks? • How well do health checks meet the needs of people with learning disabilities? • What areas does research in this topic need to focus on in the future? Background Health consultations are an interpersonal activity that influence health outcomes and attitudes towards self and health professionals for people with learning disabilities. Annual health checks have been introduced to improve health inequalities for people with learning disabilities Method A narrative literature review of health care for people with learning disabilities was undertaken to evaluate health care for this population, and specifically the outcomes from annual health checks. Findings: While annual health checks have made some improvements in terms of health outcomes, attendance for appointments is still low, provision is variable and experiences of health checks for people with learning disabilities are under-researched. Conclusions: Service-user-led research into their health experiences is needed. Research into the attitudes and experiences of health professionals in relation to people with learning disabilities is needed. Health care inequalities are only being partially addressed – improvement is needed in terms of service user experience and engagement.
    • Retrospect and Prospect: What are the future possibilities in the Care Act (2014) for older parent-carers of adults with learning disabilities? A discussion Paper.

      Gant, Valerie; Bates, Claire; University of Chester; Edge Hill University (Journal of Health and Social Care Improvement, 2017-01)
      Building on this previous research and the practice background of both authors, this paper aims to identify and then explore potential new opportunities and possible challenges brought about by the introduction of the Care Act 2014 for older parent-carers of adults with learning disabilities. By considering some of the themes that had emerged in this earlier research, set within the then current legislative and political landscape (2006), this paper aims to provide a retrospective and prospective analysis of the legal and policy context within which service delivery to this group takes place, such as to orient thinking regarding the role and function of law and policy in relation to the delivery of services to this and, potentially, other carer-groupings. Plans for future research to develop further these areas will also be discussed.
    • Understanding of the Care Act 2014 among carers of adults with learning disabilities

      Gant, Valerie; University of Chester (RCN Publishing, 2017-05-26)
      The Care Act (2014) gave new rights to carers for assessment and aimed to provide a structure for a more personalised approach to care and support (DoH, 2014). The UK population is an aging one and research indicates that people with learning disabilities are part of this longevity (Emerson and Hatton, 2008; Foster and Boxall, 2015; Walker and Ward, 2013) with the majority of people with learning disabilities remaining in family care for many years (Cairns, et al. 2013; Gant, 2010). Thus carers are frequently providers of care for their relative with a learning disability and take on many levels of responsibility, often lasting for decades. This paper describes a research study involving 9 carers of adults with learning disabilities to establish their views on this piece of legislation, its likely significance to them and their relatives, and provides a forum for discussion and debate in terms of possible implications for practice.