• Looking into the LGB affirmative therapies over the last fifty years – a mixed method review synthesis

      Broadway-Horner, Matthew; Kar, Anindya; University of Chester; Advanced Neuropsychiatry Institute, Kolkata (Taylor and Francis, 2022-04-04)
      In the past few decades, affirmative therapies for sexual minorities have burgeoned. These are appropriate therapies but often there is a lack of adequate research. We set out to study the research evidence available. For this mixed-methods review, we identified 15 studies looking into the experiences of lesbian, gay and bisexual people in psychological therapies. These included nine qualitative, five quantitative and one mixed-method study. The minority stress hypothesis may explain some of the major difficulties LGB individuals face. Studies showed computer-based therapies may reduce or even eliminate unhelpful responses on part of the therapist. Challenges related to confidentiality and privacy in this context remain. Therapists may focus on minority stress but other stressors and not just discrimination may contribute to various mental health problems and their clinical presence. And finally, divergent findings found internalized homophobia may best explain discrimination-based minority stress and that therapist self-disclosure of own sexuality produced better results than the therapists who did not self-disclose. These findings are discussed and future directions for research are identified.
    • “Our feelings are valid”- reviewing the lesbian, gay, and bisexual affirmative approaches in a mental health setting.

      Broadway-Horner, Matthew; Kar, Anindya; University of Chester; Advanced Neuropsychiatry Institute, Kolkata (Taylor and Francis, 2022-02-07)
      In recent years, although research into support mechanisms for managing distress experienced by Lesbian Gay and Bisexual (LGB) communities has increased. Stigma-related discrimination related to sexual minority status remains. This is further compounded by stigma against mental illnesses thus creating double jeopardy. This review will outline recent discoveries by exploring existing theories highlighting factors that explain health disparities for cisgender LGB people. It appears that the experience of the LGB population and the use of psychological therapies is varied across the spectrum. Some focus upon symptom reduction as part of the experience, but others talk about not being validated. Some mention minority stress constructs, alongside the psychological mediation framework, which offers a potential theoretical understanding of the experiences of the LGB population who receive psychological therapies.