• Marketing communications: A brand narrative approach

      Dahlen, Micael; Lange, Fredrik; Smith, Terry; Stockholm School of Economics ; Stockholm School of Economics ; University of Chester (Wiley, 2009-12-08)
      This book discusses branding within a marketing communications framework. It discusses key trends such as brand narrative approach and media neutral / multi-media appraches to branding.
    • Markets, Festivals and Shows: Sustainable Approaches to Gastronomic Tourism Through Collaboration

      Hindley, Ann; Wall, Tony; University of Chester (Routledge, 2019-02-01)
      This chapter reveals how and why gastronomy has been used as a tourist attraction by markets, festivals and shows in Cheshire (England). It demonstrates how gastronomy can be used to increase visitor footfall and provide an economic stimulus in rural and urban areas. It considers how gastronomy can also be used to provide the solution to or raise the profile of social and environmental factors. The Nantwich Food Festival is used as the main case study, supported by examples from the Foodies Festival Tatton Park, The Royal Cheshire County Show and the Rode Hall Farmers’ Market. The aim is to understand how varying needs within the local and wider community were identified and then met through farming-related events, which expanded or metamorphosed into their present form with gastronomy used as a pull-factor. Contemporary trends towards healthy eating, sustainable consumption, experiences and collaboration are acknowledged. UK consumers are increasingly seeking local, organic, non-GM, free-range, free-from and quality assured produce that is ethically produced, safe and traceable. ‘Foodies’ and culinary tourists continue to be drawn to unique and authentic food experiences, while gastronomic tourism events increasingly boost visitor numbers through the regular appearance of reality TV and celebrity chefs.
    • Measurement of customer satisfaction and performance measurement within a local government framework

      Wood, Sheena; Webb, Paul; Page, Steve; University of Chester (2007-07)
      The aim of the paper is to establish a performance measurement framework for addressing and improving customer satisfaction levels within a public sector service. The paper describes the methods utilised in order to achieve these objectives by reviewing relevant literature associated with organisational performance and customer satisfaction. This informs and provide the framework for the research. A useful framework model was produced that facilitates the application of customer satisfaction measurement and enables performance in this respect to be monitored.
    • Migration, money, markets and morality

      Harris, Phil; University of Chester (Wiley, 2015-11-03)
      Editorial Over the last year, the pressure of economic migration and vast numbers of people on the move who have been destabilised by conflict, instability and deprivation has impacted dramatically upon Europe and particularly the European Union (EU). Pictures of drowned children washed up on beaches, boat swampings, human flotsam, dead bodies of those suffocated and rotting in trucks of those who died being smuggled into the EU from suffocation and heat exhaustion. These are not the pictures of a civilised society and show the gang masters, wretches and gangsters of society taking advantage of human desperation. A coherent policy on economic migrants and political asylum seekers for the multi-state union has shown that one policy fitting all has buckled, broke and does not work. One has to be focused on supporting the weak and the vulnerable and giving clear guidelines on the numbers and quality of migrants that are needed in an economy. This works well in Australia, Canada and New Zealand and should be adopted more widely across the EU. Conflict and instability in the Middle East is fuelling much of this migration and the search for safety by asylum seekers. The instability of Africa and the North Coast of Africa is not helping. Long-term answers and care for immediate needs must be the answer. Europe like America has benefitted from economic migration and the wonderful contributions that asylum seekers and the persecuted have made in the past. We must make policy for refugees and migrants a public affairs and policy priority. This is a general issue of the journal and shows the breadth of thinking across the discipline.
    • Modelling determinants of a cost accounting system: Mixed methodology and logistic regression

      Nagirikandalage, P; University of Chester
      Mixed methodology is becoming increasingly significant in several scientific research areas. Empirical management and cost accounting research attempt to integrate quantitative and qualitative methods and combine theories generally associated with incommensurable paradigms. Furthermore, mixed methods research could provide a more comprehensive understanding of cost accounting research by establishing a prevailing means of validation of research findings. However, this has also been criticised considerably in the social science aspects especially due to failings of presenting a vibrant philosophical foundation to produce valid knowledge statements and also in circumstances of a concept of triangulation is emerged as a mean of validation. As a methodological note on the analytical aspects, logistic regression model has been used in various studies of management and cost accounting research. However, there are criticisms over the presentations of the logistic model which has led to a misinterpretation of research findings. As per the usage of these methodologies in various contexts are concerned, scholars in management and cost accounting have argued that Sri Lanka seems to be more profound in methodology but the methodology should be determined by the research question and it is not given. Sri Lanka is perceived to be an empirical laboratory for management research as management practices in this country are different or distinctive. Hence, reporting on distinctiveness of practices will be very appealing to international audiences. The purpose of this paper is to illustrate how the mixed methodology has been adopted and how the logistic regression model was used to model the determinants for the demand for cost accounting systems in Sri Lanka as a developing country. A cost accounting system (CAS) has been used for decision support, financial planning and control as well. Empirical evidence has shown that different factors have influenced on demand for CAS but again has shown mixed results and there is a lack of evidence from the developing country or emerging economy context as well. Hence, this research study attempts at bridging the gap between the literatures by modelling the determinants for the demand for a CAS within an emerging economy such as Sri Lanka. Logistic regression model has identified that the market competition, size, desire and need of the management, quality of the report generation and changing dynamics as significant predictors for the demand for a CAS. Thematic analysis has been adopted to analyse the qualitative data gathered to achieve an in-depth understanding of CAS. This paper allows understanding how mixed methods research is conceptualised across these studies. The findings show a range of perceived strengths and weaknesses/ limitations identified and opportunities and risks attributed to this approach as well.
    • Moments like diamonds in space: savoring the ageing process through positive engagement with adventure sports

      Hickman, Mark; Stokes, Peter; Gammon, Sean; Beard, Colin; Inkster, Allison (Informa UK Limited, 2016-10-07)
    • Monkey business, Marco Polo, and managing global public affairs and trade

      Harris, Phil; University of Chester (Wiley, 2016-02-02)
      Editorial We are now in the year of the Monkey, a year of excitement and innovation. Monkey years are often dramatic and see large-scale political change, and if you believe these things, it is predicted that we may see much political change and the forging of new alliances. Given the instability, we are seeing in the Middle East and large parts of Africa. Suspect that this is not a predication but a good probability. It is also over 700 years since Marco Polo started traveling eastwards and commented on Chinese and Indian civilizations and observed and recorded the vast amount of trade that was evident in Asia and moved along the Silk Road. He remarked that a stable system of government made this all work for the benefit of each society and that war invariably led to human suffering and mass migration and destruction. Little has changed except that the size of the Asian economies has become larger and the impact of war and conflict more psychologically impactful because of modern media, but the devastation on human life as tragic as ever. This is a general issue and reflects the vibrancy and range of material and research in the public affairs area. Researchers and practitioners represent the EU, Europe, North America, and Asia. We still have gaps in our knowledge geographically, particularly in understanding public affairs in China, India, Japan, and Korea; there has only been limited work on. The first
    • NVQs and approaches to competence in the UK: Contexts, issues and prospects

      Stokes, Peter; University of Chester (Springer, 2016-10-04)
      Chapter 15. NVQs and approaches to competence in the UK: Contexts, issues and prospects. Peter Stokes, University of Chester, UK Abstract Competence frameworks are a long-standing part of the (United Kingdom) UK training and development environment (Chang et al. 2013; CIPD, 2007, 2013, 2014; Sparrow and Bognanno, 1994). In the British context, competence-based approaches and qualifications evoke strong reactions both in terms of supporters and detractors regarding their worth, viability and relevance. Nevertheless, they have been repeatedly employed by governments and employers’ bodies as a means of responding to skills gaps in business sectors and the national economy. The Chapter examines these tensions and surfaces the underlying paradigms and drivers contributing a novel insight into competence in the UK context. The Chapter identifies prevalent characteristics in the UK competence domain. It explains these features through the impact of hegemonic modernistic and positivistic paradigms built on British socio-political traditions of empiricism, pragmatism and the valuing of the experiential. These, in turn, dominate large areas of management, organization thinking and competence approaches operating in connection with processes of commodification, marketization and socio-political issues. This context is illustrated with an ethnographically-styled case study on the implementation of a competence framework in a British semi-skilled employee organizational setting. Overall, the Chapter, in identifying and contextualising the paradigms which operate at the heart of competence in the UK, reveals implications linked to individual meaning, social class and professional identity and, also, potential future trajectories of competence in an increasingly complex world.
    • "On Mission and Leadership", Book Review

      Manning, Paul; The University of Liverpool
      Book Review
    • Organizational Dynamics and Adoption of Innovations: A Study within the Context of Software Firms in Sri Lanka

      Udagedara, Susantha; Allman, Kurt; University of Salford; University of Keele (Routledge, 2019-11-11)
      This paper examines the effect of organizational dynamics on innovation focus using the residual dominant and emergent theoretical framework (RDE) and the empirical evidence of four case studies. The findings revealed that different types of innovation coexist, but one type becomes dominant over other types at a certain time as the innovation focus is changed in line with the strategic priorities of firms. We found that innovation focus takes the form of product, process, and organizational innovation pattern over time when the firms move from an entrepreneurial organization to a more formal business corporation. More importantly, the RDE framework provides an appropriate lens for practitioners, in identifying the enablers and barriers of innovation.
    • Organizations and organizing in a French context

      Stokes, Peter; Davoine, Eric; Oiry, Ewan; University of Chester ; University of Fribourg ; Univeristy of Poitiers (Emerald Publishing, 2014-12-22)
      This special issues consists of seven papers which present French organization from different styles and perspectives.
    • Organizations and organizing in an Indian context

      Stokes, Peter; Larson, Mitchell J.; Balasubrahmanyam, Suram; Singh, Sanjay K.; University of Chester (Emerald, 2013)
      This special issue aims to deepen theoretical and empirical understanding of Indian organizations and Indian markets and comment on the unique challenges confronting organizations in emerging economies. In placing the focus on organizations and organizing in an Indian context, this special issue explores the proposition that these phenomena are qualitatively different from their manifestations in other parts of the world.
    • Perceived unfairness in appraisal: Engagement and sustainable organizational performance

      Rowland, Caroline A.; Hall, Roger D.; University of Chester; Hall Consultancy, Manchester (EuroMed Journal of Business, 2013-09-13)
      Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to explore the contribution of appraisal systems to sustainable organizational effectiveness. It argues that competitive advantage is increasingly reliant on discretionary effort. As the emphasis of appraisal has shifted from a developmental to a performance focus, perceived unfairness in both procedures and outcomes threatens to undermine commitment and, therefore, sustainable performance. Design/methodology/approach – Drawing on a range of theoretical frameworks, current practices and experiences are examined and future trends considered. Empirical research includes a ten-year study of practising managers and ethnography, questionnaires and interviews in two large organizations. Findings – Appraisal frequently creates actual and perceived injustice in terms of both procedures and rewards. It also generates tensions between managing performance and encouraging engagement. Research limitations/implications – This study indicates that further research in other sectors will contribute to the development of greater understanding of sustainable strategic approaches to HRM. Practical implications – Emphasis on performance in appraisal devalues developmental aspects and sometimes affects employee well-being. Separation of the two through mentorship schemes may help to address the paradox, whereby the performance management element of appraisal undermines rather than enhances organizational effectiveness. Originality/value – The conventional wisdom of the appraisal culture is challenged. We argue it is essential to expand the discourse between performance, justice and ethical value systems if sustainable competitive advantage and well-being are to be achieved.
    • Pictures, Colors and Emotions: Shaping the UK's E-Tourism Experience

      Schneider, Anke; Loibl, Wilhelm; Hindley, Ann; Vienna University of Economics and Business; University of Chester; University of Chester (Routledge, 2020-03-27)
      The role of online media has become more important for tourism as DMOs try to differentiate through the use of pictures on digital channels, such as websites. The aim is to provide a positive image that has a positive impact on the consumer buying decision. Pictures draw significant amounts of attention and a pictures colour characteristics are critical in maintaining interest through emotional connections. These colour characteristics concern hue, saturation and luminance, which create a positive or negative emotional response in the prospective user. Due to this importance of a pictures colour characteristics on websites, this chapter explores these colour characteristics of pictures on UK DMO websites, in order to determine the positive or negative emotions conveyed to the viewer. Results show that most pictures are neutral but the amount of negatively perceived pictures is very high. It was found that the overall visual e-tourism experience can be improved with only small post-processing changes with minimal danger of distorting reality.
    • Political corruption in Africa: Extraction and power preservation

      Robberts, Theresa (Edward Elgar Publishing, 2020-07-17)
    • Political Dissengagement and Political Hypocrisy: A Hidden Connection

      Prete, M. I.; Guido, Gianluigi; Harris, Phil; Piper, L.; University of Chester and University of Solento (Academy of Marketing, 2015-07-01)
      Best Paper in Track Political Marketing, Academy of Marketing Conference 2015, The Magic in Marketing, University of Limerick, Ireland. In recent elections, modern democracies have witnessed the growing phenomenon of political disengagement, which has produced as a direct consequence the decline or the inconstancy of voting turnout (Dermody and Scullion 2005; Teixeira 1992). This phenomenon is a real threat to the foundations of democratic systems, since the vote is the ultimate expression of legitimacy of candidates and parties, which should in fact be elected by the entire electorate and representing the same. Political engagement is one of the components that most involve the participation of citizens in public life, which also comprises trust in public institutions and politics, the interest in politics, and the active civic participation.
    • Political Marketing, Business & Management Video Collection, Sage Publications

      Harris, Phil; University of Chester (Sage, 2016-08-01)
      Professor Phil Harris explains the place of marketing in the political process. He highlights how politicians use the media to hone their image, how marketing has changed since the 1950s
    • Primogeniture in Turkish Family Owned Businesses: An examination of daughter succession, the impact of national culture on gendered norms and leadership challenge.

      Harris, Phil; Ozdemir, Ozlem; University of Chester; Regents University, London
      Family owned and controlled businesses, which may be owned, controlled or operated by various family members, account for an enormous percentage of global employment, revenues and GDP. Although the majority of well-known companies are family owned, research indicates that unfortunately, only thirty percent of family businesses survive to the second generation. Therefore, successful transfer of the business to the next generation is an important issue for the family business literature. However, although succession is a vital issue for Family Owned Businesses (FOBs), the process is unfortunately very gender biased in most societies, with boys being generally favoured over girls so daughters are always excluded as candidates and other women are seldom considered as successors in family businesses. In many cases, especially in certain cultures, female members of the next generation are not even perceived as a viable option. Even in today’s rapidly changing business climate, primogeniture continues to dominate the value system of family businesses. Primogeniture is an accepted approach to family business succession planning; daughters are only considered for family business succession when all descendants are female or the daughter is the first born. This study aims to identify the reasons behind the primogeniture in Turkish FOBs. The objectives of the study were to examine the key factors identified by the incumbents related with the primogeniture. In this research study, an interpretive methodology was adopted to explore, interpret and to understand meanings of knowledge. For this research, qualitative data were gathered via in-depth open-ended interviews with 20 male FOB owners who have at least one daughter and 20 daughters working at their FOB with their fathers. The questions were designed to measure different facets of FOB demographics and culture to understand their effects on the selection process within Turkish FOBs and gender norms in the context of FOB norms, which influence both family members and the business it. This study investigated daughters’ succession in FOBs in Turkey, a developing country where women are less likely than men to engage in entrepreneurial activities and show that gendered norms are still considered when choosing the successor, in other word, primogeniture still dominates the family business succession process.
    • Project management CPD: Combining higher education and externally produced training

      Terry, Helen (2007-06-01)
      Unpublished conference presentation given at the University of Chester staff conference in Chester, 1 June 2007.
    • Public relations: A managerial perspective

      Moss, Danny; DeSanto, Barbara; University of Chester ; Maryville University (SAGE, 2011-12-15)
      This book explores public relations from a managerial perspective. It includes chapters on public relations and other managerial functions, management and leadership, strategic management, corporate branding and corporate reputation, public affairs and lobbying, public relations and government, financial public relations, public relations consultancy, public relations and the internet, public relations and ethics, corporate social responsibility, public relations and the law, and managing global public relations.