• Curriculum design for the post-industrial society: The facilitation of individually negotiated higher education in work based learning shell frameworks in the United Kingdom

      Talbot, Jon; University of Chester (Nova Science Publishers, 2017-02-01)
      During the past twenty years there has been increasing demand for more flexible forms of higher education, especially for adult learners. Adults have strong preferences for vocational learning, tailored to their professional context. Universities, organised along lines designed to meet the needs of an industrial society have been largely unable to adapt to the consequences of increased role specialisation in the post-industrial labour market. This chapter reviews developments in accredited universities in the United Kingdom where the development of ‘shell frameworks’, based upon the requirements of learners rather than subject discipline, has enabled some adults to fulfil their learning requirements and gain formally accredited qualifications. In the absence of research in this area a detailed case study familiar to the author is presented and an agenda for further research outlined.
    • Обзор практики применения программ обучения, совмещенного с работой, (WBL) в высшем образовании Великобритании

      Talbot, Jon; Costley, Carol; Dremina, Maria; Kopnov, Viraly; University of Chester; University of Middlesex; Russian State Vocational Pedagogical University; Russian State Vocational Pedagogical University (Russian State Vocational Pedagogical University, 2017-01-30)
      Аннотация Цель публикации – обзор практических вопросов организации обучения, совмещенного с работой (ОСР – англ. WBL). Особенности применения данной технологии профессиональной подготовки рассматриваются на примере опыта деятельности университетов Великобритании. Методы. В работе использовались методы системного и сравнительного анализа, синтеза и обобщения. Результаты. Дан краткий экскурс в историю возникновения и развития технологии обучения, совмещенного с работой; показана значимость и ценность этой формы образования в современном, стремительно меняющемся обществе. Выделены основные характеристики и обозначены базовые аспекты программ ОСР (WBL), выгодно отличающихся от традиционных университетских программ релевантностью реальным производственным процессам; студентоцентричностью; гибкостью содержания, которое выстраивается исходя из интересов работодателя и обучающегося; высокой степенью интеграции различных дисциплин и областей знаний; признанием предшествующего сертифицированного и самостоятельного обучения; оптимизацией временных затрат; возможностью выбора места обучения, его последовательности, графика контрольных мероприятий и другими достоинствами. Описаны варианты реализации программ ОСР, сложности их осуществления и способы их преодоления. Научная новизна. Впервые в российской научной литературе представлено аналитическое обозрение реальных возможностей получения высшего профессионального образования, совмещенного с работой, на основе практико-ориентированной технологии, получившей широкое распространение в англоязычных странах за последние 25 лет. Практическая значимость. Материалы, изложенные в публикации, могут быть полезны руководителям и преподавателям учреждений высшего образования, методистам структур по профподготовке и повышению квалификации персонала высокотехнологичных производств, а также работодателям, возглавляющим крупные производства и заинтересованным в повышении образовательного уровня своих сотрудников.
    • A unifying, boundary crossing approach to developing climate literacy

      Hindley, Ann; Wall, Tony; University of Chester (Springer, 2017-11-18)
      Empirical evidence suggests that educational approaches to climate change remain limited, fragmented, and locked into disciplinary boundaries. The aim of this paper is to discuss the application of an innovative unifying, boundary-crossing approach to developing climate literacy. Methodologically, the study combined a literature review with an action research based approach related to delivering a Climate Change Project conducted in a mid-sized university in England. Findings suggest the approach created a unifying vision for action, and did so across multiple boundaries, including disciplinary (e.g. psychology, engineering, business), professional services (e.g. academic, library, information technology), and identity (e.g. staff, student, employee). The project generated a number of outcomes including extensive faculty level climate change resources, plans for innovative mobile applications to engage people in climate literacy, and new infrastructural arrangements to continue the development of practice and research in climate change. This paper outlines empirical insights in order to inform the design, development, and continuity of other unifying, boundary-crossing approaches to climate literacy.
    • Work-based learning as a catalyst for sustainability: a review and prospects

      Wall, Tony; Hindley, Ann; Hunt, Tamara; Peach, Jeremy; Preston, Martin; Hartley, Courtney; Fairbank, Amy; University of Chester (Emerald, 2017-02-20)
      Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to highlight the continuing dearth of scholarship about the role of work based learning in education for sustainable development, and particularly the urgent demands of climate literacy. It is proposed that forms of work based learning can act as catalysts for wider cultural change, towards embedding climate literacy in higher education institutions. Design/methodology/approach: This paper draws data from action research to present a case study of a Climate Change Project conducted through a work based learning module at a mid-sized university in the United Kingdom. Findings: Contrary to the predominantly fragmented and disciplinary bounded approaches to sustainability and climate literacy, the case study demonstrates how a form of work based learning can create a unifying vision for action, and do so across multiple disciplinary, professional service, and identity boundaries. In addition, the project generated indicators of cultural change including extensive faculty level climate change resources, creative ideas for an innovative mobile application, and new infrastructural arrangements to further develop practice and research in climate change. Research limitations/implications: Practical implications: This paper provides an illustrative example of how a pan-faculty work based learning module can act as a catalyst for change at a higher education institution. Originality/value: This paper is a contemporary call for action to stimulate and expedite climate literacy in higher education, and is the first to propose that certain forms of work based learning curricula can be a route to combating highly bounded and fragmented approaches, towards a unified and boundary-crossing approach.
    • Words, wellness and Trainspotting, 20 years' on

      Wall, Tony; University of Chester (Lapidus: The Writing for Wellbeing Organisation, 2016-08-01)
      It has been two decades since the movie release of Irvine Welsh’s novel ‘Trainspotting’. Saturated with the emotionally charged, experiential grittiness of drug addiction, infant death, and living in deprivation, it touched the hearts and minds of critics and moviegoers alike. It offered glimpses into perspectives and pressures that some of us may have to deal with on a daily basis in recovery work, and especially insightful those of us who may never come to know or even hear about such circumstances in our lifetimes. Whether or not you believe these were dramatisations or ‘reality’, Trainspotting offered the audience the possibility that these experiences may have been experienced – many scenes were deeply troubling...
    • A Collaborative Haiku Experiment: An Invitation to Cultivate a Spirit of Connection for Wellbeing

      Wall, Tony; Hopkins, Sandra; Smith, Aimee; University of Chester; University of Chester; Independent (Lapidus: The Writing for Wellbeing Organisation, 2016-08-01)
      We have adopted the teikei approach of haiku (定型, or fixed form) which employs the 5-7-5 pattern (the symmetrical 5 syllables, 7 syllables, 5 syllables pattern). Three people with an interest in writing, haiku, and wellbeing got together to explore the world of haiku via provocation through the medium of Stumbled Upon (www.stumbleupon.com) to explore what perspectives on the virtual and real world we might create...
    • The Lapidus 20th Anniversary Special Triple Edition - Capturing the Collective and Connected Spirit of Writing for Wellbeing

      Wall, Tony; University of Chester (Lapidus: The Writing for Wellbeing Organisation, 2016-08-31)
      Welcome to The Lapidus 20th Anniversary Special Triple Edition – we hope you agree that this exciting Triple Edition is bursting with ideas, metaphors, stories, science, and practices, to celebrate a very special year. Like any important anniversary we hold close to our hearts, we wanted to capture part of the celebration and share it with others. These were certainly the sentiments and experiences of our beautiful Lapidus Day 2016 and the lively conversations that were spurred on the Lapidus Facebook page afterwards...
    • Lapidus 20th Anniversary Special Edition Part 1 - The first 20 years of Lapidus

      Wall, Tony; University of Chester (Lapidus: The Writing for Wellbeing Organisation, 2016-08-31)
      Welcome to Part 1 of The Lapidus 20th Anniversary Special Triple Edition – this is the first of a three Part Special Edition with the theme, Capturing the Collective and Connected Spirit of Writing for Wellbeing. This Part collates alternative accounts and reflections particularly from our stimulating Lapidus Day 2016 celebration...
    • Lapidus Journal 20th Anniversary Special Edition Part 3 - Individuals Connecting to a Collective Spirit

      Wall, Tony; University of Chester (Lapidus: The Writing for Wellbeing Organisation, 2016-08-01)
      Welcome to Part 3 of The Lapidus 20th Anniversary Special Triple Edition – this is the final part of a Special Edition with the theme of Capturing the Collective and Connected Spirit of Writing for Wellbeing. This Part focuses on individually focused individually oriented writing practices which create new meanings, understandings, or relationships with something, including themselves...
    • Lapidus 20th Anniversary Special Edition Part 2 - Collectives Connecting to a Collective Spirit

      Wall, Tony; University of Chester (Lapidus: The Writing for Wellbeing Organisation, 2016-08-01)
      Welcome to Part 2 of The Lapidus 20th Anniversary Special Triple Edition – this is the second of a three Part Special Edition with the theme, Capturing the Collective and Connected Spirit of Writing for Wellbeing. This Part focuses on writing practices which enable multiple people to connect with each other or to other things in some way, and in doing so, create new meanings, understandings, or relationships with something, including themselves...
    • Inequalities and Agencies in Workplace Learning Experiences: International Student Perspectives

      Wall, Tony; Tran, Ly Thi; Soejatminah, Sri; University of Chester; Deakin University; Deakin University (Springer, 2016-10-31)
      National systems of vocational education and training around the globe are facing reform driven by quality, international mobility, and equity. Evidence suggests that there are qualitatively distinctive challenges in providing and sustaining workplace learning experiences to international students. However, despite growing conceptual and empirical work, there is little evidence of the experiences of these students undertaking workplace learning opportunities as part of vocational education courses. This paper draws on a four-year study funded by the Australian Research Council that involved 105 in depth interviews with international students undertaking work integrated learning placements as part of vocational education courses in Australia. The results indicate that international students can experience different forms of discrimination and deskilling, and that these were legitimised by students in relation to their understanding of themselves as being an ‘international student’ (with fewer rights). However, the results also demonstrated the ways in which international students exercised their agency towards navigating or even disrupting these circumstances, which often included developing their social and cultural capital. This study, therefore, calls for more proactively inclusive induction and support practices that promote reciprocal understandings and navigational capacities for all involved in the provision of work integrated learning. This, it is argued, would not only expand and enrich the learning opportunities for international students, their tutors, employers, and employees involved in the provision of workplace learning opportunities, but it could also be a catalyst to promote greater mutual appreciation of diversity in the workplace.
    • Business schools as educational provocateurs of productivity via interrelated landscapes of practice

      Wall, Tony; Jarvis, Madeleine; University of Chester; University of Chester (Chartered Association for Business Schools, 2015-12-01)
      In an ever-changing and global marketplace, it could be argued that the role of business schools is no longer to train graduates for specific roles. Whilst this concept that we are educating ‘for jobs that don’t yet exist’ has become more widely accepted, educational practices in business schools are arguably still contained by traditional Western practices of individualistic student instruction. Indeed, even the relevance of academic theory to practice has sparked heated debate in business schools for some time and has led to calls for a different attitude of engagement with theory (Ramsey, 2011, 2014). Some have pushed the debate from relevance to relevating as a process of challenge, change and impact (Paton, Chia and Burt, 2014). But even this is insufficient to spark forms of business and management education which provoke new ways of thinking and acting in practice which are infused with social connectedness and are beyond single discipline thinking. Notions of ‘autonomous learning’ and working ‘critically’ may be viewed as a positive development from pedagogy to andragogy in UK tertiary education. However, these can still be interpreted in deeply individualistic ways which are oppositional to notions of learning rooted in and oriented towards larger social groupings (Goodall, 2014, Yunkaporta and Kirby, 2011). Simply ‘training’ individuals in specific management activities is likely to be insufficient in unlocking transformative (and productive) community action. A new educational ontology of being is needed.
    • Reviving the Ubuntu Spirit in Landscapes of Practice: Evidence from Deep within The Forest

      Wall, Tony; University of Chester (Emerald, 2016-12-01)
      Contemporary being is framed and marred by commodification and individualism according to many scholars (for example Žižek, 2015; Furedi 2006, 2010). Walk around any large city and you will see advert, upon advert, upon advert, targeting individuals, with commodified items or experiences which aspire to make the individual feel better. Adverts for family health insurance do not target the collective family unit – they target and appeal to the concerns, values, or feelings of the purchaser to act as a responsible individual towards their family. You can walk past a faith establishment and find how they have been commodified – “Church for Hire!” (see Wall and Perrin, 2015: p16)...
    • Research Policy and Practice Provocations – Towards Research that Sparks and Connects

      Wall, Tony; Hawley, Rachel; Iordanou, Ioanna; Csigás, Zoltan; University of Chester; European Mentoring & Coaching Council (European Mentoring and Coaching Coucil, 2016-06)
      The Research Policy & Practice Provocations reports offer a forum to engage in cooperative curiosity and to question some of the underlying assumptions our profession may hold about itself and about coaching and mentoring research. We hope you find some new energy, sparks, creative insight and connectivity by engaging with this new series. We extend a warm welcome to another opportunity to co-create our future profession. The first in the series, the June 2016 Research Policy & Practice Provocations Report aims to influence how we think about and how we conduct coaching and mentoring research. This report shares: 1. A snapshot of a study to investigate the perceived ‘gap’ between scholarly research in coaching and mentoring and the reality of everyday practice, and 2. Provocative ways of potentially responding to and dealing with the results of the survey – in terms of EMCC, researchers, and practitioners...
    • The Chartered Manager Degree Apprenticeship: Trials and Tribulations

      Rowe, Lisa; Perrin, David; Wall, Tony; University of Chester (Emerald, 2016-11-14)
      Purpose: In 2014, the UK government introduced a new form of apprenticeship, the Degree Apprenticeship, which extends across all undergraduate degree and Master’s degree levels, maps to professional standards, and which is now embedded within governmental levies of large businesses. The purpose of this paper is to share early experiences of developing these Degree Apprenticeships, and consider the processes deployed to achieve it. Design/methodology/approach: This paper combines desk research with reflections on the experience of developing the new Degree Apprenticeships within Higher Education Institutes (HEI) and considers the implications of this upon current and emerging HEI practice and research. Findings: There were a number of key resources which facilitated the approval of the Degree Apprenticeship, and these included a pre-existing, flexible work based learning framework, the associated mechanisms of accreditation, existing professional networks, and a professionally oriented interface between the university, employer and professional body. Research limitations/implications: As the context is currently at the early stages of implementation, and the policy context is rapidly changing in the context of Brexit, so too will the related scholarship. This means factors others than those highlighted within this paper may emerge over the coming year or two. Practical implications: There are a number of practical implications for the development of Degree Apprenticeships from this research that are reflected in the findings, and include the development of flexible and collaborative processes, resources, and networks. Originality/value: This paper is one of the first published accounts of the development of a Degree Apprenticeship within the context of the new policy context in the UK.
    • Exploration of the key factors to enable Negotiated Work Based Learning to be accepted within HE - a case based approach

      Weston, Philippa; University of Chester (ASET, 2014-09)
      Using a case based approach, this paper will examine some key factors that appear necessary if negotiated forms of work based learning (NWBL) have any chance of being accepted into the HE provision. The case study examined here is part of a wider doctoral study examining what factors impact on how different universities perceive and locate work based learning (WBL) and particularly NWBL into their HE provision. The case study is based on the University of Chester (Chester) which is generally recognised within the wider academic community in WBL as having created one of the most flexible academic frameworks to support different forms of WBL and NWBL. The study focuses on the experiences, memories and reflections of three key individuals who were involved in the early stages of developing the Work Based and Integrative Studies (WBIS) framework at Chester which is now used extensively to support all forms of WBL both internally within the university and also in the wider external community (Major, Meakin, & Perrin, 2011). The flexibility and sustainability of Chester’s WBIS framework is evidenced by its ability to facilitate an increasing variety of WBL projects from the more traditional HE WBL offerings such as placements, corporate programmes and contract partnerships to projects that are more challenging for HE such as co-delivery arrangements and formal partnerships (Talbot, Perrin, & Meakin, 2014). Drawing on the work of Major, Perrin, Talbot, Wall and Meakin who are all practitioners and researchers of NWBL and WBL at Chester, together with prominent researchers within the wider field of NWBL such as Portwood, Costley and Gibbs, the paper identifies some key factors, such as the need for a champion, the influence of the university’s culture, the relevance of the word ‘integrative’ and the importance of timing. In addition it will highlight that for such initiatives to be effective and sustainable, WBL and in particular NWBL must be underpinned through strong organisational and governance capabilities to ensure the resultant programmes meet the criteria from a quality assurance perspective. The paper concludes by drawing together and evaluating whether the factors which appear key in enabling the WBIS framework at Chester could be embraced by other Universities in their pursuit of WBL initiatives (Talbot et al., 2014).
    • Towards a national-institutional policy for high-impact research

      Wall, Tony; University of Chester (2016-03-14)
      Austerity has sharpened our attention on 'the impact debate' and has reinvigorated interest in action oriented and collaborative forms of research which create results in practice. At the same time, the potential of the University College Isle of Man (as a deeply connected part of the Isle) offers the rare and unique possibility of developing a strategic national-institutional policy to drive particular forms of research. This presentation envisions the possibility this ambition and highlights some of its rewards and risks. In this way, the presentation aims to both spark and contribute to collaborative research which involves results in practice.
    • Why Educational Reform is Like 'looking for the Donkey whilst sitting on its back': provocations from a Zizekian analysis

      Wall, Tony; University of Chester (Deakin University, 2016-02-12)
      Why is it education is supposedly failing to meet the demands of our society? Why is it there are record levels of stress for teachers? Why is it there is a record level of complaints from our university students? How is it now possible to compare a higher education course with a vacuum cleaner, toaster or television? Through the analytical apparatus of contemporary philosopher and politico-cultural theorist Slavoj Žižek (who introduces a cocktail of Lacan, Hegel and Marx), this seminar offers an alternative perspective on these modern challenges and tensions in education.
    • Poignant Pedagogies for Discovery – or of Compliance? The Case of Negotiated, Work-Based Learning in Higher Education

      Wall, Tony; University of Chester (Deakin University, 2014-08-21)
      Work-based or work-integrated learning manifest in a colourful array of forms; from classroom-based where the teacher sets the learning outcomes and activities (perhaps in groups) – through to a fully negotiated, work- based experience where the learner works with the teacher to negotiate their own personal learning outcomes, activity and assessment (a personalised experience). Educationally, such curricula can provide a rich and authentic pedagogic space in which to grow personally and professionally, where the learner has the opportunity (and ability) to explore from their own cultural perspective. But this place of discovery can also become a place of compliance; where learners mechanically do what is required of them, without creative engagement, curiosity or connection to their cultural perspective. This talk draws on qualitative and action research undertaken over the last 6 years in the context of negotiated, experiential curricula to examine some pedagogical practices. The question is asked: are we crafting poignant pedagogies for discovery – or of compliance?
    • Provocative Education: From Buddhism for Busy People® to Dismal Land®

      Wall, Tony; University of Chester (University of Wyoming, 2016-03-14)
      In 2015, the OECD reported global investments in expanding and enhancing work-based education to better meet the needs of employers (indeed, the US Department for Labor has just announced its highest ever investment in apprenticeships). Within this ongoing trend towards conceptualising education through an economic lens, what do our thoughts, feelings, and behaviours tell us about how we (unconsciously) conceptualise contemporary education? This presentation experiments with a form of Žižekian ideology critique as a research methodology to examine (and intentionally provoke) how we relate to and engage with education as a student and customer, or teacher and service provider. Two examples of how education is commodified are examined: the "Buddhism for Busy People®" book, and the "Dismal Land®" theme park. Consistent with the research methodology, the presentation seeks to provoke sparks of insight and ideas rather than dictate learning outcomes.