• Branding of Southern African politics: The Case of the Democratic Progressive Party of Malawi and the African National Congress of South Africa

      Harris, Phil; Perrin, David; Simenti-Phiri, Easton D.; University of Chester (Global Business and Technology Association, 2015-07)
      A paper which examines the professionalisation of political campaigns in Southern Africa, using comparative methodology to examine the cases of Malawi and South Africa, selecting prominent political organisations in each.
    • A partial review of Work Based Learning in English and Welsh universities

      Talbot, Jon; University of Chester (2016-02-11)
      The presentation briefly summarises what is known about Work based learning departments in England and Wales
    • Repurposing MOOCs for the Accreditation of Prior Learning: A survey of practice in university Work Based Learning departments

      Talbot, Jon; University of Chester (Universities Association for Lifelong Learning, 2016-03-18)
      The presentation summarises a small survey of APL practices in work based learning departments in universities in England and Wales in respect of willingness to accept completion of a MOOC learning programme. The study found few students with MOOC certificates approached universities for accreditation and that few were likely to accept them in any case. The study highlights how many students are now engaged in work based learning and the varieties of practice associated with the Accreditation/ Recognition of Prior Learning.
    • Who will accredit MOOC learning? a survey of work based learning departments in English and Welsh universities

      Talbot, Jon; University of Chester (The Open University, 2016-02-26)
      The presentation is of a small survey to determine whether Work based learning departments have sufficient flexibility to admit MOOC certificates as the basis for APL/RPL claims. The main finding is that there is low awareness of MOOCs among tutors such that is unlikely many would recognise the value of a MOOC certificate as the basis for a claim for past learning.
    • Theory and practice in work based learning: an English case study

      Talbot, Jon; University of Chester (Waxmann, 2016-04-21)
      The chapter reviews the development of Work Based Learning in the UK and provides details of the Work Based and Integrated Studies programme at the University of Chester.
    • Where are we with lifelong learning?

      Talbot, Jon; University of Chester (Nova Publications, 2016-04-21)
      The preface briefly reviews global economic development and lifelong learning
    • Lifelong learning: Concepts, benefits and barriers

      Panitsides, Eugenia A.; Talbot, Jon; Hellenic Open University, University of Chester (NOVA Publishers, 2016-04-21)
      The book reviews contemporary developments in lifelong learning in the context of globalisation
    • Developing effective pedagogies for lifelong learning: The Work Based and Integrative Studies program and its impact on the Forum Mobility project

      Talbot, Jon; Meakin, Robert; Jones, Gary; University of Chester, University of Chester, Forum Mobility Centres (NOVA Publishers, 2016-02-01)
      The chapter reviews the way the Work Based and Integrative Studies programme has transformed the forum mobility Centres into a learning organisation
    • The Americanisation of Southern African Political Campaigns: A comparative study from Malawi and South Africa

      Harris, Phil; Perrin, David; Simenti-Phiri, Easton D.; University of Chester (North American Business Press, 2014-10-13)
      This paper seeks to examine extent and rationale of Malawian and South African campaigns incorporating America –style practices and becoming Americanised. Specifically the paper explores existence of evidence supporting the notion of Americanisation in both Malawian and South African politics. Using a mixed methods approach, semi structured interviews, focus group discussions and content analysis were conducted. Results show evidence of Americanisation and increased use of marketing and campaign professionals in both Malawi and South Africa, due to democratisation, development of the media and changes in the social-economic factors. Practical implications of these findings and ideas for further research are presented.
    • Žižekian ideas in critical reflection: the tricks and traps of mobilising radical management insight

      Wall, Tony; University of Chester (Emerald, 2016-04-01)
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to examine how deeper psychosocial structures can be examined utilising a contemporary provocative theory within workplace reflection to generate more radical insights and innovation. Design/methodology/approach This paper outlines a provocative theory and then presents case examples of how deeper structures can be examined at the micro, meso and macro levels. Findings Deeper psychosocial structures are the forces that keep the status quo firmly in place, but deeper examination of these structures enable radical insights and therefore the possibility of innovation. Research limitations/implications Deep psychosocial structures shape and constitute daily action, and so work based and practitioner researchers can be tricked into thinking they have identified new ways of working, but maybe demonstrating the same workplace behaviours/outcomes. Workplace behaviours, including emotional responses to apparent change, are key indicators of deeper structures. Practical implications Ideas and processes for examining deeper structures can be integrated into daily reflective practices by individuals, within organisational processes, and wider, system processes. However, because deeper structures can appear in different forms, we can be tricked into reproducing old structures. Social implications (if applicable) Examining deeper structures increases the possibilities for more radical insights into workplace structures, and therefore, how to potentially mobilise innovations which may better serve people and planet. Originality/value (mandatory) This paper is the first to examine the work of Slavoj Žižek in the context of work based learning.
    • Author Response: Provocative Education: From Buddhism for Busy People® to Dismal Land ®

      Wall, Tony; University of Chester (Springer, 2016-03-11)
      When we engage with Žižekian thought, we might conceptualise contemporary education as part of wider machinery to perpetuate and deepen the grasp capitalism has in a globalising world (also see Furedi, 2006, 2010). We might see how ideas, knowledge, and ‘everything else’ (c.f. Hawking, 2001, 2007) can and is packaged up into forms that are easily consumed by audiences buying the educational objects. Such processes of commodification actively render objects to the audience for sale, and appear across all spheres of human activity; this is why we must remember that according to some philosophical stances, the signified has a slippery relationship with the signifier (c.f. Lacau and Mouffee, 1985). Three examples help animate this phenomenon and some of the different consequences of it. The first example illustrates how commodification can apply to areas of life that we might think of as difficult to capture spiritually or experientially: now, for time-poor people who want to quickly reap the existential benefits of Buddhism, there is a wide range of easily accessible texts at affordable prices to choose from. Titles include “Buddhism for Busy People”, “Buddhism Plain and Simple”, “The Little Book of Buddhism”, “Buddhism Made Simple”, “Buddhism: for Beginners!”, “Buddhism for Dummies”, “Sit Like A Buddha”, “Hurry Up and Meditate”, “Enlightenment to Go”, and “The Dalai Lama's Cat”. In and through such texts, commodified versions of Buddhism appear, much the same way as Buddha-like statues appear in NASA photos of Mars (Feltman, 2015).
    • Global Perspectives on Profound Pedagogies

      Wall, Tony; University of Chester (Emerald, 2015-09-01)
      Welcome to the global perspectives on profound pedagogies special issue of Higher Education, Skills and Work Based Learning (HESWBL). This special issue aspires to contribute to work-based learning (WBL) scholarship and highlights two dimensions important in contemporary educational settings: global perspectives and profound pedagogy. The first of these is increasingly important in the context of the relentless internationalisation and globalisation of education. According to the latest OECD reports, the number of students “enrolled outside their country of citizenship” doubled to 4.5 million between 2000 and 2012, “despite” the global recession (OECD, 2014, p. 343), and predictions indicate that this is set to reach 7.2 million by 2025 (Altbach et al., 2009). This trend is reflected within vocational higher education more specifically, especially Luxembourg (49 per cent of vocational higher education students), New Zealand (21 per cent), Australia and Denmark (both 11 per cent) (OECD, 2014, p. 354). Globally, the OECD inform us that 29 per cent of the 450 educational policy reforms examined by the OECD between 2008 and 2014 target vocationally oriented/work-based education as well as internationalisation (OECD, 2015).
    • Re-purposing MOOCs and OER for academic credit in the UK using the Work Based and Integrated Studies programme at the University of Chester

      Talbot, Jon; University of Chester (IGI Global, 2015-08-17)
      The chapter reviews the development of MOOCs and their relationship with formal learning (ie accredited) frameworks and qualifications. It cites a case study where the use of a flexible Work based learning framework enables accreditation for MOOC learning.
    • Make Your Learning Count: Recognition of Prior Learning (RPL)

      Perrin, David; Helyer, Ruth; University of Chester; Teesside University (Palgrave Macmillan, 2015-05-01)
      In this chapter readers will learn: ► What the Recognition of Prior Learning (RPL) is; ► How to use the Accreditation of Prior Learning (APL) process to make a claim for academic credit; ► How to include any certificated and experiential learning in an APL claim; ► How to scope out strengths and expertise as ‘Areas of Learning’ you can claim for; ► How to make and submit an APL claim with appropriate supporting evidence.
    • Evaluating Self Care in an English hospital

      Talbot, Jon; University of Chester (2015-09-07)
      This is the presentation of results from a small scale evaluation of a programme in an English hospital designed to improve staff welfare and reduce sickness absence. The results suggest some success in reducing sickness (measured by 12 months pre with 12 months post attendance) where participants attended follow up sessions. However individuals identified as suitable for the programme who did not actually attend improved their sickness record by a comparable rate to those attending. While the programme appears to have some value, the hospital had no effective strategy for dealing with the biggest cause of sickness - gastrointestinal illness. The study suggests further reductions in sickness rates are dependent upon a multi-faceted approach using data the hospital routinely collects as the basis for effective actions.
    • Re-purposing MOOCs for academic credit: a student and tutor perspective

      Talbot, Jon; Christensen, Tim; University of Chester (2015-09-10)
      The presentation briefly outlines practices in respect of the Accreditation of Prior Learning and their use in awarding credit for students who complete an automated assessment from a Massive Online Learning Course (MOOC). The presentation tells the story of how this was achieved for the first time from the perspective of the tutor and student. Some preliminary research findings indicate that this is probably unique in the UK.
    • Story skills for managers: Nurturing motivation with teams

      Wall, Tony; Rossetti, Lisa; University of Chester (CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform, 2013-08-28)
      Scientists tell us our brains are wired to live through stories. Stories are not just a natural way to communicate; they are used to boost engagement and well-being. This books offers managers practical tools and guidance on: >How stories keep your finger on the pulse of what’s going on >How to design stories to target motivational needs >How to tell high impact stories for optimal effect >How to breed stories in an upward spiral of positive cultural effect.
    • A Žižekian gaze at education

      Wall, Tony; Perrin, David; University of Chester (Springer, 2015-07-31)
      Žižek demands we take a long, hard look at the painful reality of education in contemporary capitalist society, and to actively seek out its ‘trouble in paradise’: Why is it education is supposedly failing to meet the demands of our society? Why is it there are record levels of stress for teachers? Why is it there is a record level of complaints from our university students? How is it now possible to compare a higher education course with a vacuum cleaner, toaster or television? This book illuminates aspects of Žižek’s ideas which sheds light into these modern challenges and tensions in education, and considers alternative ways forward. Though Žižek frustrates as much as he inspires with his own recipe of Lacan, Hegel and Marx, this book aims to give an entry route into Žižekian critique of education, a topic area he very rarely directly talks about.
    • Transforming research-learning performance with professional lifelong learners

      Wall, Tony; University of Chester (Elsevier, 2014-02-21)
      In Europe, universities promote accredited professional development opportunities as a key strand of their lifelong learning commitment. Within this context, learning about research methods can be problematic to busy professionals, as it can appear dislocated from practice and unworthy of the energy and effort it takes to understand what might be perceved as a purely academic pursuit. The purpose of the study was to tackle this situation: to enhance the professional's experience and learning performance in research methods, in the context of work based learning Bachelor's and Master's degrees. Action research was used to develop a pedagogic approach to faciliate learning with busy professionals. The results suggest a significantly more positive experience for the learners, and a verified increase in performance (% grades) in assessed work. This paper gives an overview of the pedagogic approach and tools developed.
    • Making employer and university partnerships work: Accredited employer-led learning

      Dhillon, Bop; Edmonds, Therese; Felce, Alison; Minton, Ann; Wall, Tony; EBTA Service ; E H Booth & Co Ltd ; University of Wolverhampton ; University of Derby ; University of Chester (Libri Publishing, 2011-11-01)