Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorRøset, Linda
dc.contributor.authorGreen, Ken
dc.contributor.authorThurston, Miranda
dc.date.accessioned2019-09-17T10:06:57Z
dc.date.available2019-09-17T10:06:57Z
dc.date.issued2019-06-24
dc.identifier.citationRøset, L., Green, K. & Thurston, M. (2019). Norwegian youngsters’ perceptions of physical education: exploring the implications for mental health, Sport, Education and Society, 25(6), 618-630.en_US
dc.identifier.issn1357-3322
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/13573322.2019.1634043
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/622613
dc.descriptionThis is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Sport, Education and Society on 24-6-19, available online: https://doi.org/10.1080/13573322.2019.1634043en_US
dc.description.abstractImproving young people’s mental health has become a priority for policy-makers in Norway as elsewhere. Although the evidence is limited, physical activity has been identified as having a role in mental health promotion with school physical education (PE) typically being presented as a suitable setting. Few studies, however, have explored young people’s perceptions and experiences of PE and the possible consequences for their mental health – the departure point for this paper. We approach this issue sociologically by focusing on the processes through which PE is enacted. Qualitative data were generated by 31 focus groups involving 148 youngsters from the 10th grade (15–16-year-olds) in eight secondary schools in Norway. The overarching theme to emerge was that PE was valued by the students for what it was not as much as what it was. The appeal of PE often lay in being different and a break from ‘normal’ school lessons and, at the same time, an opportunity for informal social interaction and strengthening social bonds. Enjoyment of PE – even among those with limited sporting competence – was understood as giving rise to cathartic benefits and an antidote to their increasingly academic, routinized and performance-oriented school lives. However, processes relating to the organization, delivery and assessment of lessons meant that these benefits were sometimes compromised for some young people. We conclude that as far as the mental health of young people is concerned, the best justificatory defence for PE becomes physical recreation as a solution to (academic) schooling rather than PE as education.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherTaylor & Francisen_US
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/13573322.2019.1634043en_US
dc.rightsCC0 1.0 Universal*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/en_US
dc.subjectPhysical educationen_US
dc.subjectmental healthen_US
dc.subjectstudentsen_US
dc.subjectNorwayen_US
dc.titleNorwegian youngsters’ perceptions of physical education: Exploring the implications for mental healthen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.eissn1470-1243
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Chesteren_US
dc.identifier.journalSport, Education and Societyen_US
or.grant.openaccessYesen_US
rioxxterms.funderunfundeden_US
rioxxterms.identifier.projectunfundeden_US
rioxxterms.versionAMen_US
rioxxterms.versionofrecordhttps://doi.org/10.1080/13573322.2019.1634043
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2020-12-24
rioxxterms.publicationdate2019-06-24
dc.dateAccepted2019-06-17
dc.date.deposited2019-09-17


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
PE and mental health in Norway ...
Size:
458.5Kb
Format:
PDF
Request:
Main article

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

CC0 1.0 Universal
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as CC0 1.0 Universal