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dc.contributor.authorMcGhee, Stephen
dc.contributor.authorFinnegan, Alan
dc.contributor.authorAngus, Neil
dc.contributor.authorClochesy, John
dc.date.accessioned2019-09-13T00:44:53Z
dc.date.available2019-09-13T00:44:53Z
dc.date.issued2019-03-04
dc.identifierpubmed: 31468803
dc.identifierdoi: 10.7748/en.2019.e1896
dc.identifierpii: 15
dc.identifier.citationEmergency nurse : the journal of the RCN Accident and Emergency Nursing Association, volume 27, issue 2, page 27-31
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/622601
dc.descriptionFrom PubMed via Jisc Publications Router
dc.descriptionHistory: accepted 2018-11-28
dc.descriptionPublication status: ppublish
dc.description.abstractRecent incidents in the UK and the alleged chemical attacks in Syria by the Bashar al-Assad regime have brought the subject of chemical weapons back into the public domain. To date these types of event have been relatively rare because terrorist plans to harm large numbers of people have mostly been thwarted. This is the first part of a two-part article on nerve agents. Part one gives an overview of these agents, their historical background and manufacture, and how the agents affect physiology. Part two, which will appear in the next issue, considers the pre-hospital response to the use of nerve agents, including effective triage and decontamination, and in-hospital treatment. [Abstract copyright: ©2019 RCN Publishing Company Ltd. All rights reserved. Not to be copied, transmitted or recorded in any way, in whole or part, without prior permission of the publishers.]
dc.languageeng
dc.sourceeissn: 2047-8984
dc.subjectemergency care
dc.subjectemergency services
dc.subjectpre-hospital care
dc.subjectpublic health
dc.subjecttrauma
dc.titleNerve agents: a guide for emergency nurses. Part 1.
dc.typearticle
dc.date.updated2019-09-13T00:44:53Z
dc.date.accepted2018-11-28


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