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dc.contributor.authorMillington, Richard
dc.date.accessioned2019-09-02T10:48:27Z
dc.date.available2019-09-02T10:48:27Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.identifier.citationMillington, R. (2020-forthcoming). State Power and 'Everyday Criminality' in the German Democratic Republic, 1961-1989. German History.en_US
dc.identifier.issn0266-3554
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/622554
dc.descriptionThis is a pre-copyedited, author-produced PDF of an article accepted for publication in German History following peer review. The version of record Millington, R. (2020-forthcoming). State Power and 'Everyday Criminality' in the German Democratic Republic, 1961-1989. German History is available online at: DOI to be added on publication.en_US
dc.description.abstractFriedrich Engels claimed that communists would ‘take an axe to the root of crime’; the removal of the perceived causes of crime in a society - capitalist economic and societal conditions - would automatically lead to its eradication. This did not, however, prove to be the case in the German Democratic Republic (GDR), where instances of ‘everyday criminality’ such as theft, robbery and assault never fell below 100,000 throughout the period of the state’s existence from 1949 to 1989. This article examines the ruling Socialist Unity Party’s (SED) perceptions of the causes of ‘everyday criminality’ in the GDR. It shows that the SED concluded that crime persisted because citizens’ ‘socialist sense of legal right and wrong’ (sozialistisches Rechtsbewußtsein) was underdeveloped. The regime measured this by the extent to which citizens supported and participated in socialist society. Thus, crime could be eliminated by co-opting as many citizens as possible into the Party’s political project. The SED’s ideological tunnel vision on the causes of ‘everyday criminality meant that it dismissed hints about the real causes of crime, such as poor supply and living conditions, identified by its analysts. Its failure to address these issues meant that citizens continued to break the law. Thus, the Party’s exercise of power contributed to the creation of limits to that power. Moreover, analysis of opinion polls with GDR citizens about their attitudes to criminality shows that they accepted crime as a part of everyday life.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherOUPen_US
dc.relation.urlhttps://academic.oup.com/ghen_US
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/en_US
dc.subjectHistoryen_US
dc.subjectGermanen_US
dc.subjectGermanyen_US
dc.subjectCrimeen_US
dc.subjectCriminalityen_US
dc.subjectCold Waren_US
dc.subjectEast Germanyen_US
dc.titleState Power and 'Everyday Criminality' in the German Democratic Republic, 1961-1989en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.eissn1477-089X
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Chesteren_US
dc.identifier.journalGerman Historyen_US
dc.date.accepted2019-08-21
or.grant.openaccessYesen_US
rioxxterms.funderUniversity of Chesteren_US
rioxxterms.identifier.projectQR Grant, Millington, 2017/18en_US
rioxxterms.versionAMen_US
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2022-12-31
refterms.dateFCD2019-08-22T09:01:53Z
refterms.versionFCDAM


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