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dc.contributor.authorSchepman, Astrid
dc.contributor.authorRodway, Paul
dc.date.accessioned2019-09-02T09:50:22Z
dc.date.available2019-09-02T09:50:22Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.citationSchepman, A. & Rodway, P. (2019). Shared meaning in representational and abstract visual art: an empirical study. Psychology of Aesthetics, Creativity, and the Arts.en_US
dc.identifier.issn1931-3896
dc.identifier.doi10.1037/aca0000279
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/622552
dc.descriptionThis article may not exactly replicate the final version published in the APA journal. It is not the copy of record.en_US
dc.description.abstractA longstanding and important question is how meaning is generated by visual art. One view is that abstract art uses a universal language whereas representational art is tied to specific knowledge. This view predicts that meaning for abstract is shared across viewers to a greater extent than for representational art. This contrasts with a view of greater shared meaning for representational than abstract art, because of shared associations for the entities depicted in representational art, as supported by recent empirical findings. This study examined the contrasting predictions derived from these two views. 49 nonexpert adult participants wrote brief descriptions of meanings that they attributed to 20 abstract and 20 representational artworks, generating a corpus of 1918 texts. Computational analyses (semantic textual similarity, latent semantic analysis) and linguistic analysis (type-token ratio) provided triangulated quantitative data. Frequentist and Bayesian statistical analyses showed that meanings were shared to a somewhat greater extent for representational art, but that meanings for abstract artworks were also shared above baseline. Triangulated human and machine analyses of the texts showed core shared meanings for both art types, derived from literal and metaphoric interpretations of visual elements. The findings support the view that representational art elicits higher levels of shared meaning than abstract art. The empirical findings can be used to enhance theoretical and computational models of aesthetic evaluation, and the rigorous new methodologies developed can be deployed in many other contexts.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherAmerican Psychological Associationen_US
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.apa.org/pubs/journals/aca/en_US
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/en_US
dc.subjectnatural language processingen_US
dc.subjectcomputational linguisticsen_US
dc.subjectempirical aestheticsen_US
dc.subjectmeaningen_US
dc.subjectarten_US
dc.titleShared meaning in representational and abstract visual art: an empirical studyen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.eissn1931-390X
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Chesteren_US
dc.identifier.journalPsychology of Aesthetics, Creativity, and the Artsen_US
dc.date.accepted2019-07-22
or.grant.openaccessYesen_US
rioxxterms.funderInternally fundeden_US
rioxxterms.identifier.projectNot applicableen_US
rioxxterms.versionAMen_US
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2019-07-22
refterms.dateFCD2019-08-29T14:00:05Z
refterms.versionFCDAM
refterms.dateFOA2019-09-02T09:50:23Z


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