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dc.contributor.authorPalmer, Matthew
dc.contributor.authorStefanidis, Kayla
dc.contributor.authorTurner, Ashlee
dc.contributor.authorTranent, Peter
dc.contributor.authorBreen, Rachel
dc.contributor.authorKucina, Talira
dc.contributor.authorBrumby, Laura
dc.contributor.authorHolt, Glenys
dc.contributor.authorFell, James
dc.contributor.authorSauer, James
dc.date.accessioned2019-07-30T09:00:39Z
dc.date.available2019-07-30T09:00:39Z
dc.date.issued2019-08-27
dc.identifier.citationPalmer, M. A., Stefanidis, K., Turner, A., Tranent, P. J., Breen, R., Kucina, T., Brumby, L., Holt, G. A., Fell, J. W., & Sauer, J. D. (2019). Acute physical exercise can influence the accuracy of metacognitive judgments. Scientific Reports, 9, 12412.en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/s41598-019-48861-3
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/622446
dc.description.abstractAcute exercise generally benefits memory but little research has examined how exercise affects metacognition (knowledge of memory performance). We show that a single bout of exercise can influence metacognition in paired-associate learning. Participants completed 30- min of moderate-intensity exercise before or after studying a series of word pairs (cloudivory), and completed cued-recall (cloud-?; Experiments 1 & 2) and recognition memory tests (cloud-? spoon; ivory; drill; choir; Experiment 2). Participants made judgments of learning prior to cued-recall tests (JOLs; predicted likelihood of recalling the second word of each pair when shown the first) and feeling-of-knowing judgments prior to recognition tests (FOK; predicted likelihood of recognizing the second word from four alternatives). Compared to noexercise control conditions, exercise before encoding enhanced cued-recall in Experiment 1 but not Experiment 2 and did not affect recognition. Exercise after encoding did not influence memory. In conditions where exercise did not benefit memory, it increased JOLs and FOK judgments relative to accuracy (Experiments 1 & 2) and impaired the relative accuracy of JOLs (ability to distinguish remembered from non-remembered items; Experiment 2). Acute exercise seems to signal likely remembering; this has implications for understanding the effects of exercise on metacognition, and for incorporating exercise into study routines.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherNatureen_US
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-019-48861-3en_US
dc.rightsAttribution-NoDerivatives 4.0 International*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/4.0/en_US
dc.subjectexerciseen_US
dc.subjectfeeling of knowing (FOK)en_US
dc.subjectmemoryen_US
dc.subjectmetacognitionen_US
dc.subjectjudgments of learning (JOLs)en_US
dc.titleAcute physical exercise can influence the accuracy of metacognitive judgmentsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.eissn2045-2322
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Tasmania, University of the Sunshine Coast, University of Sydney, University of Chesteren_US
dc.identifier.journalScientific Reportsen_US
dc.date.accepted2019-07-17
or.grant.openaccessYesen_US
rioxxterms.funderAustralian Research Council Granten_US
rioxxterms.identifier.projectDP140103746en_US
rioxxterms.versionAMen_US
rioxxterms.versionofrecordhttps://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-019-48861-3
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2019-08-27


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Attribution-NoDerivatives 4.0 International
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Attribution-NoDerivatives 4.0 International