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dc.contributor.authorNathan, Rajan; email: taj.nathan@nhs.net
dc.contributor.authorCentifanti, Luna
dc.contributor.authorBaker, Vikki
dc.contributor.authorHill, Jonathan
dc.date.accessioned2019-07-11T00:41:56Z
dc.date.available2019-07-11T00:41:56Z
dc.date.issued2019-07-08
dc.identifierdoi: 10.1016/j.ijlp.2019.101463
dc.identifier.citationInternational Journal of Law and Psychiatry, volume 66, page 101463
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/622414
dc.descriptionFrom Elsevier via Jisc Publications Router
dc.descriptionHistory: accepted 2019-06-25, epub 2019-07-08, issue date 2019-10-31
dc.descriptionArticle version: AM
dc.descriptionPublication status: Published
dc.descriptionFunder: Home Office
dc.descriptionFunder: Department of Health
dc.description.abstractAbstract Background Offenders with personality disorder experience significant co-morbid mental health problems and present with an increased risk of offending. The evidence for the effectiveness of interventions for personality disordered offenders in the community is limited. This study was a pilot study to determine the feasibility of a randomised controlled trial (RCT) of an intervention known as Resettle for personality disordered offenders and to explore the possible effects of this intervention. Methods Potential participants were recruited from referrals of male prisoners to Resettle. Those consenting underwent baseline assessments before being randomised to Resettle or treatment as usual. Officially recorded and self-report offending was assessed over two years following release from custody. Of the 110 eligible participants, 72 (65%) participated in the study of whom 38 were randomised to Resettle and 34 to treatment as usual. The two groups had a similar psychiatric and offending profile. Results Analysis of officially recorded offences at two years found mixed results, but whether adopting an intent-to-treat approach or including only those who received the intervention there was no clear evidence of an effect of the intervention. A comparison of self-report offending found no effect of Resettle in an intent-to-treat analysis, but there was an effect when the analysis involved only those participating in the intervention. Conclusions This study demonstrated that with some adjustments it was possible to carry out an RCT of a complex intervention for personality disordered offenders in a criminal justice setting. Some, but not conclusive, evidence was found in favour of the intervention.
dc.publisherElsevier
dc.rightsLicence for AM version of this article starting on 2021-07-08: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
dc.rightsEmbargo: ends 2021-07-08
dc.sourceissn: 01602527
dc.titleA pilot randomised controlled trial of a programme of psychosocial interventions (Resettle) for high risk personality disordered offenders
dc.typearticle
dc.date.updated2019-07-11T00:41:56Z
dc.date.accepted2019-06-25


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