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dc.contributor.authorDavies, Emma*
dc.contributor.authorO'Leary, Erin*
dc.contributor.authorReed, John*
dc.date.accessioned2019-06-06T11:27:08Z
dc.date.available2019-06-06T11:27:08Z
dc.date.issued2015-10-15
dc.identifier.citationDavies, E., O’Leary, E., & Read, J. (2017). Child abuse in England and Wales 2003–2013: Newspaper reporting versus reality. Journalism, 18(6), 754–771. https://doi.org/10.1177/1464884915610994en_US
dc.identifier.issn1464-8849
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/1464884915610994
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/622325
dc.description.abstractThis study examined how child abuse and neglect were reported in a sample of 459 newspaper articles between 2003 and 2013 in England and Wales. The results were compared with data on child abuse and neglect over the same decade. Sexual abuse was by far the most commonly reported, in both tabloid and broadsheet newspapers. Although neglect and emotional abuse are the most common causes of child protection plans in England and Wales, neglect and emotional abuse are relatively invisible in newspaper articles, as is physical abuse. Possible explanations for this disproportionate focus on sexual abuse, which has also been found in Australia and the United States, include the fact that sexual abuse cases reach the criminal courts more often than other forms of child victimisation. Although broadsheet papers were more likely than tabloid newspapers to comment on causes and solutions beyond the individual perpetrator committing a crime, the majority of articles in broadsheet papers still did not frame either the causes or the solutions in broader terms. It seems possible that the notion of the decontextualised ‘evil’ perpetrator serves to distance journalist and reader alike from the pervasiveness and pain of child abuse. The article concludes with ideas to improve the accuracy and utility of the coverage of child abuse and neglect in newspapers.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherSageen_US
dc.relation.urlhttps://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/1464884915610994#articleCitationDownloadContaineren_US
dc.relation.urlhttp://hdl.handle.net/10552/5922en_US
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/en_US
dc.subjectBroadsheeten_US
dc.subjectChild abuseen_US
dc.subjectChild maltreatmenten_US
dc.subjectChild neglecten_US
dc.subjectNewsen_US
dc.subjectPrint mediaen_US
dc.subjectTabloiden_US
dc.titleChild abuse in England and Wales 2003–2013: Newspaper reporting versus realityen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.eissn1741-3001
dc.contributor.departmentLiverpool John Moores University, UK; Swinburne University of Technology, Australiaen_US
dc.identifier.journalJournalismen_US
dc.date.accepted2015-04-15
or.grant.openaccessYesen_US
rioxxterms.funderunfundeden_US
rioxxterms.identifier.projectunfundeden_US
rioxxterms.versionAMen_US
rioxxterms.versionofrecordhttps://doi.org/10.1177/1464884915610994
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2215-10-15
atmire.accessrights
rioxxterms.publicationdate2015-10-15


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