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dc.contributor.authorUllah, Farid*
dc.contributor.authorSmith, Robert*
dc.date.accessioned2019-04-23T14:25:11Z
dc.date.available2019-04-23T14:25:11Z
dc.date.issued2015-06-10
dc.identifier.citationUllah, F. & Smith, R. (2015). "The “Fairness Paradox” and “Small-Firm Growth Resistance Strategies”. World Journal of Entrepreneurship, Management and Sustainable Development, 11(3), 154-175.
dc.identifier.doi10.1108/WJEMSD-02-2015-0005
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/622165
dc.description.abstractPurpose – We examine and explore why ‘Small-Businesses’ resist employing outside the immediate family and investigate the employee as an outsider and entrepreneurial resource. Design/methodology/approach – We review the literature on barriers to small-business growth concentrating on key empirical and theoretical studies. We use empirical data from the Federation of Small Business (FSB) in which informants commented on growth and employing outside the family. Findings – The findings suggest that small business owners adopt a polemical stance, arguing that a barrage of employment regulations deters them from employing outsiders because doing so brings trouble in terms of costs such as insurance, taxes, paperwork, leave (maternity and paternity) entitlement etc. They argue that employing from inside the family or ones peer group is much cheaper, convenient and less hassle. This ignores the entrepreneurial employee as a potential ingredient of growth and points to a paradox whereby the very values and emotions characterised by fairness of which of ‘smallness’ and ‘familialness’ is composed compound the issues of discrimination central to the debate. Research limitations/implications – We offer important insights for growth issues among small businesses and challenge the contemporary equilibrium in terms of small ‘family-orientated’ business philosophy relating to employment practices. Ideologically, the entrepreneur is an “outsider” fighting the establishment, yet paradoxically, in a small business context s/he becomes the establishment by employing outsiders. This results in the fairness versus unfairness paradox. Originality/value – We contribute to the existing knowledge and understanding on growth issues among small businesses by illuminating a paradoxical insider versus outsider tension.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherEmerald
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.emeraldinsight.com/doi/abs/10.1108/WJEMSD-02-2015-0005
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/en
dc.subjectThe Fairness Paradox
dc.subjectSmall business growth
dc.subjectSmall-firms
dc.subjectSmall-firm mentality
dc.subjectResistance strategies
dc.subjectEmployment Regulation
dc.subjectSqueezed firm thesis
dc.subjectDiscrimination
dc.titleThe ‘Fairness Paradox’ and ‘Small-Firm Growth Resistance Strategies’
dc.typeArticle
dc.identifier.eissn2042-5961
dc.identifier.journalWorld Journal of Entrepreneurship, Management and Sustainable Developmenten
dc.date.accepted2015-01-03
or.grant.openaccessYesen
rioxxterms.funderunfundeden_US
rioxxterms.identifier.projectunfundeden_US
rioxxterms.versionAOen_US
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2015-06-10


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