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dc.contributor.authorChavasse, Richard*
dc.contributor.authorScott, Stephen*
dc.date.accessioned2019-03-25T05:03:53Z
dc.date.available2019-03-25T05:03:53Z
dc.date.issued2019-03-11
dc.date.submitted2018-11-07
dc.identifierdoi: 10.3389/fped.2019.00064
dc.identifier.citationFrontiers in Pediatrics, volume 7, page 64
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/622039
dc.descriptionFrom Frontiers via Jisc Publications Router
dc.descriptionHistory: received 2018-11-07, collection 2019, accepted 2019-02-18, epub 2019-03-11
dc.descriptionPublication status: Published
dc.description.abstractAcute asthma or wheeze is a common presentation to emergency services for both adults and children. Although there are phenotypic differences between asthma syndromes, the management of acute symptoms follow similar lines. This article looks at the similarities and differences in approaches for children and adults. Some of these may be age dependent, such as the physiological parameters used to define the severity of the attack or the use of age appropriate inhaler devices. Other differences may reflect the availability of evidence. In other areas there is conflicting evidence between adult and pediatric studies such as a temporary increase in dose of inhaled corticosteroids during an acute attack. Overall there are more similarities than differences.
dc.languageen
dc.publisherFrontiers Media S.A.
dc.rightsLicence for this article: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.sourceeissn: 2296-2360
dc.subjectPediatrics
dc.subjectasthma
dc.subjectattack
dc.subjectadults
dc.subjectchildren
dc.subjecttreatment
dc.titleThe Differences in Acute Management of Asthma in Adults and Children
dc.typearticle
dc.date.updated2019-03-25T05:03:53Z
dc.date.accepted2019-02-18
refterms.dateFOA2019-03-25T05:03:54Z


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