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dc.contributor.authorHart, Christopher*
dc.date.accessioned2019-03-15T12:08:45Z
dc.date.available2019-03-15T12:08:45Z
dc.date.issued2018-10-14
dc.identifier.citationHart, C. (2018). Introduction. In Hart, C. (Ed.), World War I Media, Entertainments & Popular Culture. Cheshire: Midrash.
dc.identifier.isbn9781905984213
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/621999
dc.description.abstractThis introduction proposes the argument that during the First World War entertainments , media and popular culture used the war to attract audiences and readers - five propositions are introduced. The first is this. Entertainment as a topic for study is not trivial, inconsequential or irrelevant. To understand any culture look at what its members do for their entertainment. This includes looking at such things as, in 1914, jokes and humour, songs and music, drama and plays, cartoons and caricatures, films and animation, fiction and gossip, photographs and illustrations, advertising and posters, and newspapers and magazines. This proposition will be discussed in more detail once the other four propositions have been stated. The second position is this. The core activities that are taken as entertainment, such as the cinema, books, music and newspapers, are surrounded by the institutions, industries and crafts which bring the entertainments to the marketplace. The third position is the recognition people read, sing, watch, listen and laugh not just for leisure but also when doing work and other activities. Entertainment does not always have to be separate from the workplace or from time doing work-based tasks; it can be incorporated into most aspects of life. The fourth position follows on from longstanding debates about hierarchical schemes of entertainment regarding differentiated cultural value. Notions of high culture and low culture, popular culture and elite culture are overworked dichotomies that distract attention from the entertainment under study, as a thing in itself, and lead to prejudice against one of the classes of entertainment on the scale. If classical music performances are elitist, exclusionist and class-based it does not entail they are ‘bad' and things should be otherwise. It is not the music or musicians that are excluding anyone. It is the instructional arrangements that bring such performances to the marketplace, a lack of education provided about the value of the experience and, possibly, snobbishness of some audiences. The fifth proposition is entertainment is about audience experience. This can take multiple forms for the same audience of an entertainment. Bosshart and Macconi (1998) include the following in a list of possible experiences an audience member can take from consuming a particular media - obtaining relaxation, being distracted, seeing something different to the norm, seeking excitement or a thrill, wanting to laugh, sharing the joy and enjoying a place.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherMidrash
dc.rightsCC0 1.0 Universal*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/en
dc.subjectIntroduction
dc.subjectArgument
dc.titleIntroduction
dc.typeBook chapter
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Chesteren
dc.date.accepted2015-07
or.grant.openaccessYesen
rioxxterms.fundernaen_US
rioxxterms.identifier.projectunnfundeden_US
rioxxterms.versionAMen_US
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2218-10-14
refterms.dateFCD2018-09-19T10:20:54Z
refterms.versionFCDAM


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