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dc.contributor.authorRoberts, Anna I.*
dc.contributor.authorRoberts, Sam G. B.*
dc.date.accessioned2018-11-03T02:01:21Z
dc.date.available2018-11-03T02:01:21Z
dc.date.issued2018-10-19
dc.date.submitted2017-01-02
dc.identifierpubmed: 30338419
dc.identifierdoi: 10.1007/s10071-018-1219-6
dc.identifierpii: 10.1007/s10071-018-1219-6
dc.identifier.citationAnimal cognition
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/621515
dc.descriptionFrom PubMed via Jisc Publications Router.
dc.descriptionPublication status: aheadofprint
dc.descriptionHistory: received 2017-01-02, revised 2018-09-28, accepted 2018-10-01
dc.description.abstractA key challenge for primates is coordinating behaviour with conspecifics in large, complex social groups. Gestures play a key role in this process and chimpanzees show considerable flexibility communicating through single gestures, sequences of gestures interspersed with periods of response waiting (persistence), and rapid sequences where gestures are made in quick succession, too rapid for the response waiting to have occurred. The previous studies examined behavioural reactions to single gestures and sequences, but whether this complexity is associated with more complex sociality at the level of the dyad partner and the group as a whole is not well understood. We used social network analysis to examine how the production of single gestures and sequences of gestures was related to the duration of time spent in proximity and individual differences in proximity in wild East African chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes schweinfurthii). Pairs of chimpanzees that spent a longer duration of time in proximity had higher rates of persistence sequences, but not a higher rate of single gestures or rapid sequences. The duration of time spent in proximity was also related to the rate of responding to gestures, and response to gesture by activity change. These results suggest that communicative persistence and the type of response to gestures may play an important role in regulating social interactions in primate societies.
dc.languageeng
dc.sourceeissn: 1435-9456
dc.subjectChimpanzees
dc.subjectCooperation
dc.subjectElaboration
dc.subjectEvolutionary trade-off
dc.subjectGestural communication
dc.subjectGrooming
dc.subjectJoint activity
dc.subjectProximity
dc.subjectRepetition
dc.subjectResponse
dc.subjectSocial bonds
dc.subjectSocial networks
dc.titlePersistence in gestural communication predicts sociality in wild chimpanzees.
dc.typearticle
dc.date.updated2018-11-03T02:01:20Z
dc.date.accepted2018-10-01


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