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dc.contributor.authorFernandez, Rosa M.*
dc.date.accessioned2018-08-15T08:54:35Z
dc.date.available2018-08-15T08:54:35Z
dc.date.issued2018-06-06
dc.identifierpublisher-id: s13412-018-0499-0
dc.identifiermanuscript: 499
dc.identifierdoi: 10.1007/s13412-018-0499-0
dc.identifier.citationFernandez, R. M. (2018). Conflicting energy policy priorities in EU energy governance. Journal of Environmental Studies and Sciences, 8(3), 239-248. https://doi.org/10.1007/s13412-018-0499-0
dc.identifier.issn2190-6483
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s13412-018-0499-0
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/621303
dc.descriptionThe final publication is available at Springer via http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s13412-018-0499-0
dc.description.abstractAbstractIn the last decade, energy policies across EU member states have shifted, with fears emerging over the feasibility of the decarbonisation targets set up at European level. In many cases, the changes have been triggered by weakened economic conditions linked to the last international economic crisis (2008), but in some others, they respond to national political preferences that have been given priority over long-term goals related to sustainability. The second half of 2016 was particularly full of events that on one hand, introduced uncertainty over markets, and on the other hand, may condition the progress (both weakening it and leaning it towards the wrong path) towards the Energy Union, the latest attempt to achieve energy market integration by the EU institutions. This paper will focus on three events to analyse their influence over EU’s energy governance patterns: The first is the Brexit vote and the implications over budget availability for emissions reduction projects. The second is the election of Donald Trump as president of the USA, with his declared disbelief in climate change. Finally yet importantly is the latest decision by OPEC to cut production in order to increase oil prices. With the exception of Brexit, these events are external to the EU, but all of them will have an impact over EU energy policy decisions. Bearing in mind that goals set up for 2030 are already ‘softer’ than expected compared to the 2020 ones, the question is whether those events could push policymakers more towards European targets concerned with security of supply, conflicting with emissions reduction goals.
dc.languageen
dc.publisherSpringer
dc.relation.urlhttps://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s13412-018-0499-0
dc.rightsLicense: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ open-access Open Access This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made.
dc.sourcepissn: 2190-6483
dc.sourceeissn: 2190-6491
dc.subjectArticle
dc.subjectEnergy governance
dc.subjectEnergy policy
dc.subjectEnergy Union
dc.subjectIntegration
dc.subjectSustainability
dc.titleConflicting energy policy priorities in EU energy governance
dc.typearticle
dc.date.updated2018-08-15T08:54:35Z
dc.rights.licenseLicense: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ open-access Open Access This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made.


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