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dc.contributor.authorHaydock, Deborah*
dc.contributor.authorMannix, Jean*
dc.contributor.authorGidman, Janice*
dc.date.accessioned2018-06-20T12:16:04Z
dc.date.available2018-06-20T12:16:04Z
dc.date.issued2011-05-19
dc.identifier.citationHaydock, D., Mannix, J., & Gidman, J. (2011). CPTs’ perceptions of their role satisfaction and levels of professional burnout. Community Practitioner, 84(5), 21-25.
dc.identifier.issn1462-2815
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/621204
dc.description.abstractThis paper reports on a multi-method research project that explored perceived role satisfaction and professional burnout among community practice teachers (CPTs) while facilitating postregistration education and caseload management. A bespoke Satisfaction Questionnaire and the Maslach Burnout Inventory (Educators) were completed by 23 participants to elicit quantitative and qualitative data. Findings are presented in relation to three themes – aspects of the CPT role leading to satisfaction, aspects leading to dissatisfaction or burnout, and ways to enhance satisfaction and reduce burnout. The majority of CPTs were satisfied with their current role. A number of factors were elicited that affected participants’ perceived satisfaction. Respondents scored low levels of burnout overall, with high levels of personal accomplishment and low levels of depersonalisation. The relationship between participants’ satisfaction and their levels of burnout was not found to be statistically significant. However, mean scores on the emotional exhaustion subscale indicate moderate levels of emotional exhaustion. The paper concludes with recommendations to improve the support provided by employers and partner universities for CPTs.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherMedia-Sheden
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.communitypractitioner.co.uk/en
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/en
dc.subjectRole satisfaction and professional burnouten
dc.subjectCPTsen
dc.titleCPTs’ perceptions of their role satisfaction and levels of professional burnouten
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Chester
dc.identifier.journalCommunity Practitioner
dc.internal.reviewer-noteChecking with publisher 24/05/18 SMen
dc.date.accepted2011-03-19
or.grant.openaccessYesen
rioxxterms.funderUnfundeden
rioxxterms.identifier.projectUnfundeden
rioxxterms.versionVoRen
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2018-07-20
html.description.abstractThis paper reports on a multi-method research project that explored perceived role satisfaction and professional burnout among community practice teachers (CPTs) while facilitating postregistration education and caseload management. A bespoke Satisfaction Questionnaire and the Maslach Burnout Inventory (Educators) were completed by 23 participants to elicit quantitative and qualitative data. Findings are presented in relation to three themes – aspects of the CPT role leading to satisfaction, aspects leading to dissatisfaction or burnout, and ways to enhance satisfaction and reduce burnout. The majority of CPTs were satisfied with their current role. A number of factors were elicited that affected participants’ perceived satisfaction. Respondents scored low levels of burnout overall, with high levels of personal accomplishment and low levels of depersonalisation. The relationship between participants’ satisfaction and their levels of burnout was not found to be statistically significant. However, mean scores on the emotional exhaustion subscale indicate moderate levels of emotional exhaustion. The paper concludes with recommendations to improve the support provided by employers and partner universities for CPTs.


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