• Sodium and potassium intakes assessed by 24-h urine among Moroccan University students in Casablanca, Morocco: Cross-sectional study

      Elarbaoui, Maria; Jafri, Ali; Elkardi, Younes; Makhlouki, Houria; Ellahi, Basma; Derouiche, Abdelfettah (Elsevier, 2022-06-21)
      In Morocco, the high consumption of dietary sodium increases the risk of non-communicable diseases (NCDs) and predisposes to cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) and hypertension. This study aims to assess the dietary sodium and potassium intake in a random sample of Moroccan adult students as a benchmark informing a national strategy for reducing salt intake. This cross-sectional study was conducted with 103 adults aged 18 to 25 years recruited in Casablanca. The 24-hour urinary excretion was used to measure the sodium and potassium. Urine volume and creatinine excretion level were used to validate the completeness of the collected samples. The average urinary sodium excretion was 3.1±0.1g/day, 13.5% consumed less than 5g/day, while 69% consumed more than 5g/day of which 17.5% consumed more than twice the recommendations. For the average urinary potassium excretion was 1.83±0.06g/day, and more than 98% of the students consumed less than the adequate intake. The Na/K ratio is significantly higher than the recommended amounts. The results of this pilot study show that the population studied has a high sodium intake and low potassium intake which does not meet World Health Organization (WHO) recommendations, which requires implementing an action plan to reduce salt intake.
    • Group LCD and group reversible LCD codes

      Dougherty, Steven T.; Gildea, Joe; Korban, Adrian; orcid: 0000-0001-5206-6480; Roberts, Adam M.; orcid: 0000-0002-0654-7096 (Elsevier, 2022-06-17)
      In this paper, we give a new method for constructing LCD codes. We employ group rings and a well known map that sends group ring elements to a subring of the n × n matrices to obtain LCD codes. Our construction method guarantees that our LCD codes are also group codes, namely, the codes are ideals in a group ring. We show that with a certain condition on the group ring element v, one can construct non-trivial group LCD codes. Moreover, we also show that by adding more constraints on the group ring element v, one can construct group LCD codes that are reversible. We present many examples of binary group LCD codes of which some are optimal and group reversible LCD codes with different parameters.
    • An examination of the dynamics of intergenerational tensions and technological change in the context of post-pandemic recovery

      Moore, Neil; Rowe, Lisa; Stokes, Peter; orcid: 0000-0002-4016-1058; Lichy, Jessica; Rodgers, Peter; Smith, Simon M.; orcid: 0000-0001-8083-2728 (Informa UK Limited, 2022-06-15)
    • The General Attitudes towards Artificial Intelligence Scale (GAAIS): Confirmatory Validation and Associations with Personality, Corporate Distrust, and General Trust

      Schepman, Astrid; orcid: 0000-0002-7407-362X; Rodway, Paul; orcid: 0000-0002-7667-6782 (Informa UK Limited, 2022-06-14)
    • Evaluation of Drinking Water Quality and Bacterial Antibiotic Sensitivity in Wells and Standpipes at Household Water Points in Freetown, Sierra Leone.

      Kamara, Dauda; orcid: 0000-0001-7750-8273; Bah, Doris; Sesay, Momodu; Maruta, Anna; orcid: 0000-0002-6417-7273; Sesay, Bockarie Pompey; Fofanah, Bobson Derrick; orcid: 0000-0003-3276-8949; Kamara, Ibrahim Franklyn; orcid: 0000-0003-1454-4650; Kanu, Joseph Sam; orcid: 0000-0003-0799-6907; Lakoh, Sulaiman; orcid: 0000-0002-7639-0004; Molleh, Bailah; et al. (2022-05-29)
      Water quality surveillance can help to reduce waterborne diseases. Despite better access to safe drinking water in Sierra Leone, about a third of the population (3 million people) drink water from unimproved sources. In this cross-sectional study, we collected water samples from 15 standpipes and 5 wells and measured the physicochemical and bacteriological water quality, and the antimicrobial sensitivity of ( ) in two communities in Freetown, Sierra Leone in the dry and wet seasons in 2021. All water sources were contaminated with , and all five wells and 25% of standpipes had at least an intermediate risk level of . There was no antimicrobial resistance detected in the tested. The nitrate level exceeded the WHO's recommended standard (>10 parts per million) in 60% of the wells and in less than 20% of the standpipes. The proportion of samples from standpipes with high levels of total dissolved solids (>10 Nephelometric Turbidity Units) was much higher in the rainy season (73% vs. 7%). The level of water contamination is concerning. We suggest options to reduce contamination. Further research is required to identify where contamination of the water in standpipes is occurring.
    • ‘The Golden Question’. Addressing supervisee self‐care in clinical supervision

      Seabrook, Michelle; orcid: 0000-0001-5800-7123 (Wiley, 2022-05-25)
    • Magazines as contradictory spaces for alcohol messaging: a mixed method content and thematic analysis of UK women’s magazine representations of alcohol and its consumption

      Atkinson, A. M.; orcid: 0000-0002-9936-6138; Meadows, B. R.; Ross-Houle, K. M.; Smith, C.; Sumnall, H. R.; orcid: 0000-0002-7841-9245 (Informa UK Limited, 2022-05-16)
    • Towards adoption of mobile data collection for effective adaptation and climate risk management in Africa

      Adekola, Olalekan; orcid: 0000-0001-9747-0583; Lamond, Jessica; orcid: 0000-0001-8931-0192; Adelekan, Ibidun; orcid: 0000-0002-3407-8549; Bhattacharya‐Mis, Namrata; orcid: 0000-0003-4967-8325; Ekinya, Mboto; Bassey Eze, Eze; Ujoh, Fanan; orcid: 0000-0003-2554-0815 (Wiley, 2022-05-16)
    • Towards adoption of mobile data collection for effective adaptation and climate risk management in Africa

      Adekola, Olalekan; orcid: 0000-0001-9747-0583; email: o.adekola@yorksj.ac.uk; Lamond, Jessica; orcid: 0000-0001-8931-0192; Adelekan, Ibidun; orcid: 0000-0002-3407-8549; Bhattacharya‐Mis, Namrata; orcid: 0000-0003-4967-8325; Ekinya, Mboto; Bassey Eze, Eze; Ujoh, Fanan; orcid: 0000-0003-2554-0815 (2022-05-16)
      Abstract: The collection and use of data on climate change and its impacts are crucial for effective climate adaptation and climate risk management. The revolution in internet access, technology and costs has led to a shift from using traditional paper‐based data collection to the use of Mobile Data Collection using Personal Digital Assistants (PDA) such as smartphones and tablets. In this paper, we report our experiences using both approaches for a household and business survey during a climate adaptation study in two Nigerian cities—Makurdi and Calabar. The focus of this paper is to evaluate and compare the effectiveness of using traditional paper‐based data collection and PDAs as data collection tools for climate change study in African societies. In Calabar, data were collected using paper questionnaires, while in Makurdi the questionnaires were developed on Open Data Kit (ODK) and administered using PDAs. Results show that data collection using PDA was faster, cheaper, more accurate and resulted in fewer omissions than paper‐based data collection. There was a time saving of four (4) minutes per questionnaire and a 24% cost saving when using PDA. PDA provides additional benefits where platforms can collect images, videos and coordinates. This significantly improved the credibility of the data collection process and provided further data that allowed for the mapping of environmental phenomena by linking survey research with geo‐referenced data in a geographic information systems platform to provide spatial representations of social and environmental system convergence. PDA offers a tool for collecting data that will make necessary socio‐environmental data available in a faster, reliable and cheaper manner; future research can build on this study by discovering other possible but less highlighted benefits of PDA. Although, with great benefits, there are lessons to be learnt and issues to consider when deploying PDA in large‐scale household surveys.
    • Factors Influencing COVID-19 Vaccine Uptake among Nepali People in the UK: A Qualitative Study

      Simkhada, Padam; email: p.p.simkhada@hud.ac.uk; Tamang, Pasang; orcid: 0000-0003-2733-7239; email: pasang.tamang@hud.ac.uk; Timilsina, Laxmi; email: laxmi.timalsina@hud.ac.uk; Simkhada, Bibha; email: b.d.simkhada@hud.ac.uk; Bissell, Paul; email: p.bissell@chester.ac.uk; van Teijlingen, Edwin; email: evteijlingen@bournemouth.ac.uk; Sah, Sunil Kumar; email: sunil.sah@nhs.net; Wasti, Sharada Prasad; orcid: 0000-0001-8833-7801; email: s.p.wasti@hud.ac.uk (MDPI, 2022-05-14)
      Vaccination saves lives and can be an effective strategy for preventing the spread of the COVID-19, but negative attitudes towards vaccines lead to vaccine hesitancy. This study aimed to explore the factors influencing the uptake of the COVID-19 vaccine in the Nepali community in the United Kingdom (UK). This qualitative study included in-depth interviews with 20 people from Nepal living in the UK. Interviews were conducted by a native-Nepali speaker and all interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed, and translated into English before being analysed thematically. Our study found that attitudes towards COVID-19 are generally positive. Nine overlapping themes around barriers to COVID-19 vaccination were identified: (a) rumours and mis/disinformation; (b) prefer home remedies and yoga; (c) religion restriction; (d) concern towards vaccine eligibility; (e) difficulty with online vaccine booking system; (f) doubts of vaccine effectiveness after changing the second dose timeline; (g) lack of confidence in the vaccine; (h) past bad experience with the influenza vaccine; and i) worried about side-effects. Understanding barriers to the uptake of the COVID-19 vaccine can help in the design of better targeted interventions. Public health messages including favourable policy should be tailored to address those barriers and make this vaccination programme more viable and acceptable to the ethnic minority communities in the UK.
    • Factors Influencing COVID-19 Vaccine Uptake among Nepali People in the UK: A Qualitative Study.

      Simkhada, Padam; orcid: 0000-0002-5706-6479; Tamang, Pasang; orcid: 0000-0003-2733-7239; Timilsina, Laxmi; Simkhada, Bibha; Bissell, Paul; van Teijlingen, Edwin; Sah, Sunil Kumar; orcid: 0000-0002-0356-1992; Wasti, Sharada Prasad; orcid: 0000-0001-8833-7801 (2022-05-14)
      Vaccination saves lives and can be an effective strategy for preventing the spread of the COVID-19, but negative attitudes towards vaccines lead to vaccine hesitancy. This study aimed to explore the factors influencing the uptake of the COVID-19 vaccine in the Nepali community in the United Kingdom (UK). This qualitative study included in-depth interviews with 20 people from Nepal living in the UK. Interviews were conducted by a native-Nepali speaker and all interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed, and translated into English before being analysed thematically. Our study found that attitudes towards COVID-19 are generally positive. Nine overlapping themes around barriers to COVID-19 vaccination were identified: (a) rumours and mis/disinformation; (b) prefer home remedies and yoga; (c) religion restriction; (d) concern towards vaccine eligibility; (e) difficulty with online vaccine booking system; (f) doubts of vaccine effectiveness after changing the second dose timeline; (g) lack of confidence in the vaccine; (h) past bad experience with the influenza vaccine; and (i) worried about side-effects. Understanding barriers to the uptake of the COVID-19 vaccine can help in the design of better targeted interventions. Public health messages including favourable policy should be tailored to address those barriers and make this vaccination programme more viable and acceptable to the ethnic minority communities in the UK.
    • Factors Influencing COVID-19 Vaccine Uptake among Nepali People in the UK: A Qualitative Study.

      Simkhada, Padam; orcid: 0000-0002-5706-6479; Tamang, Pasang; orcid: 0000-0003-2733-7239; Timilsina, Laxmi; Simkhada, Bibha; Bissell, Paul; van Teijlingen, Edwin; Sah, Sunil Kumar; orcid: 0000-0002-0356-1992; Wasti, Sharada Prasad; orcid: 0000-0001-8833-7801 (2022-05-14)
      Vaccination saves lives and can be an effective strategy for preventing the spread of the COVID-19, but negative attitudes towards vaccines lead to vaccine hesitancy. This study aimed to explore the factors influencing the uptake of the COVID-19 vaccine in the Nepali community in the United Kingdom (UK). This qualitative study included in-depth interviews with 20 people from Nepal living in the UK. Interviews were conducted by a native-Nepali speaker and all interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed, and translated into English before being analysed thematically. Our study found that attitudes towards COVID-19 are generally positive. Nine overlapping themes around barriers to COVID-19 vaccination were identified: (a) rumours and mis/disinformation; (b) prefer home remedies and yoga; (c) religion restriction; (d) concern towards vaccine eligibility; (e) difficulty with online vaccine booking system; (f) doubts of vaccine effectiveness after changing the second dose timeline; (g) lack of confidence in the vaccine; (h) past bad experience with the influenza vaccine; and (i) worried about side-effects. Understanding barriers to the uptake of the COVID-19 vaccine can help in the design of better targeted interventions. Public health messages including favourable policy should be tailored to address those barriers and make this vaccination programme more viable and acceptable to the ethnic minority communities in the UK.
    • Nursing care for the military veteran and their family.

      Finnegan, Alan; orcid: 0000-0002-2189-4926; Randles, Rebecca; orcid: 0000-0002-7401-5817 (2022-05-09)
    • Nursing care for the military veteran and their family

      Finnegan, Alan; orcid: 0000-0002-2189-4926; Randles, Rebecca; orcid: 0000-0002-7401-5817 (Wiley, 2022-05-09)
    • Editorial: COVID-19-Social Science Research During a Pandemic.

      Ward, Paul R; Bissell, Paul; Meyer, Samantha B; Gesesew, Hailay A; Januraga, Pande Putu; Chang, Dukjin; Lombi, Linda (2022-05-09)
    • Beyond the medical encounter: can the free association narrative interview method extend psychosocial understandings of non-epileptic attack disorder?

      Peacock, Marian; Dickson, Jon M.; Bissell, Paul; Grunewald, Richard; Reuber, Markus (Bristol University Press, 2022-05-05)
      This exploratory interdisciplinary study was devised to explore how using the free association narrative interview (FANI) method might extend understanding of non-epileptic attack disorder (NEAD) within a psychosocial framework. NEAD is the medical definition of what can be described as embodied events that resemble epilepsy, but which are not associated with the abnormal electrical discharges in the brain found in epilepsy. They are the most frequent ‘functional’ disorder or medically unexplained symptom (MUS) seen by neurologists. While NEAD is associated with trauma, distress and negative life events, a significant minority of patients report no trauma history. The FANI method, we argue, produced narratives which shed light on events that patients have not acknowledged as traumatic, but which might be considered as such, and we explore what aspects of the method may facilitate this process. Previous work has highlighted that a diagnosis of NEAD is often experienced as deeply troubling and contentious to both give and to receive. We thus reflect on the need for patients to feel a sense of legitimacy and how the challenges of living with a NEAD diagnosis are negotiated. Drawing on the work of Benjamin (2004) on ‘thirdness’, we suggest that the FANI method can allow the research interview to become a space that facilitates novel ways of engaging around NEAD. We conclude that the method may be a powerful tool for studying NEAD, and that further studies should be undertaken using this approach since it may have broader utility in understanding the landscape of functional neurological disorders.
    • Causation, historiographic approaches and the investigation of serious adverse incidents in mental health settings.

      Bhandari, Sahil; Thomassen, Øyvind; Nathan, Rajan; orcid: 0000-0003-2780-6170 (2022-05-03)
      To improve the safety of healthcare systems, it is necessary to understand harm-related events that occur in these systems. In mental health services, particular attention is paid to harm arising from the actions of patients against themselves or others. The primary intention of examining these adverse events is to inform changes to care provision so as to reduce the likelihood of the recurrence of such events. The predominant approach to investigating adverse incidents has relied on the cause-and-effect conceptualisation of past events. Whilst the merits of approaches which are reliant on cause-and-effect narratives have been questioned, alternatives models to explain adverse incidents in health settings have not been theoretically or empirically tested. This novel article (i) examines the notion of causation (and the related notion of omission) in the context of explaining adverse events in mental health settings, and (ii) draws on a long-established discipline devoted to the study of how the past is interpreted (namely historiography) to theoretically investigate the innovative application of two historiographical approaches (i.e. counterfactual analysis and historical materialism) to understanding adverse events in mental health settings.
    • Causation, historiographic approaches and the investigation of serious adverse incidents in mental health settings

      Bhandari, Sahil; Thomassen, Øyvind; Nathan, Rajan; orcid: 0000-0003-2780-6170 (SAGE Publications, 2022-05-03)
      To improve the safety of healthcare systems, it is necessary to understand harm-related events that occur in these systems. In mental health services, particular attention is paid to harm arising from the actions of patients against themselves or others. The primary intention of examining these adverse events is to inform changes to care provision so as to reduce the likelihood of the recurrence of such events. The predominant approach to investigating adverse incidents has relied on the cause-and-effect conceptualisation of past events. Whilst the merits of approaches which are reliant on cause-and-effect narratives have been questioned, alternatives models to explain adverse incidents in health settings have not been theoretically or empirically tested. This novel article (i) examines the notion of causation (and the related notion of omission) in the context of explaining adverse events in mental health settings, and (ii) draws on a long-established discipline devoted to the study of how the past is interpreted (namely historiography) to theoretically investigate the innovative application of two historiographical approaches (i.e. counterfactual analysis and historical materialism) to understanding adverse events in mental health settings.
    • Active agents of change: A conceptual framework for social justice-orientated citizenship education

      Egan-Simon, Daryn; orcid: 0000-0002-3570-9090 (SAGE Publications, 2022-05-03)
      Social justice–orientated citizenship education (SJCE) can help young people to develop the knowledge, skills and dispositions to work collectively towards solutions to problems such as human rights violations, global poverty and environmental sustainability (DeJaeghere and Tudball, 2007; Banks, 2017; Hartung, 2017). Furthermore, SJCE can enable young people to think critically, consciously and compassionately and allow them to grow intellectually with a concern for equality and justice. This paper presents a conceptual framework for SJCE for educators and educational researchers wishing to explore citizenship education within social justice contexts. The framework is based on four constitutive elements: agency, dialogue, criticality and emancipatory knowledge, and has its philosophical foundations deeply rooted in the values and principles of critical pedagogy (Kincheloe, 2004; McLaren, 2014; Giroux, 2016). This conceptual framework for SJCE is ultimately concerned with developing justice-orientated active agents of change who are concerned with making the world more democratic, equitable and just.
    • The ‘physician-athlete’ and the development of sports medicine as a ‘very peculiar practice’

      Waddington, Ivan; Brissonneau, Christophe (Informa UK Limited, 2022-05-03)