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dc.contributor.authorJia, Yu*
dc.contributor.authorMiao. Ying*
dc.date.accessioned2018-06-11T16:11:49Z
dc.date.available2018-06-11T16:11:49Z
dc.date.issued2018-05-17
dc.identifier.citationJia, Y., & Miao, Y. (2018). Evidence for the Perception of Time Distortion During Episodes of Alice in Wonderland Syndrome. Journal of Nervous and Mental Diseases, 206(6), 473-475.en
dc.identifier.doi10.1097/NMD.0000000000000825
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/621183
dc.descriptionThis is a non-final version of an article published in final form in Jia, Y., & Miao, Y. (2018). Evidence for the Perception of Time Distortion During Episodes of Alice in Wonderland Syndrome. Journal of Nervous and Mental Diseases. http://doi.org/10.1097/NMD.0000000000000825en
dc.description.abstractAlice in Wonderland syndrome (AIWS) is a rare perceptual disorder associated with sensation of one or several visual and/or auditory perceptual distortions including size of body parts, size of external objects, or passage of time (either speeding up or slowing down). Cause for AIWS is yet to be widely agreed, and the implications are widely varied. One of the research difficulties is the brevity of each episode, typically not exceeding few tens of minutes. This article presents a male adult in late 20s who has apparently experienced AIWS episodes since childhood, and infection has been ruled out. Reaction speed tests were conducted during and after AIWS episodes, across a span of 13 months. Statistically significant evidence is present for delayed response time during AIWS episodes when the patient claims to experience a sensation of time distortion: where events seem to move faster and people appear to speak quicker.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherLippincott, Williams & Wilkinsen
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29781892en
dc.relation.urlhttps://journals.lww.com/jonmd/Abstract/publishahead/Evidence_for_the_Perception_of_Time_Distortion.99462.aspxen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/en
dc.subjectAIWSen
dc.subjectTime distortionen
dc.titleEvidence for the Perception of Time Distortion During Episodes of Alice in Wonderland Syndromeen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.eissn1539-736X
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Chester; Aston Universityen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Nervous and Mental Disease
dc.date.accepted2018-05-01
or.grant.openaccessYesen
rioxxterms.funderUnfundeden
rioxxterms.identifier.projectUnfundeden
rioxxterms.versionAMen
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2019-05-17
html.description.abstractAlice in Wonderland syndrome (AIWS) is a rare perceptual disorder associated with sensation of one or several visual and/or auditory perceptual distortions including size of body parts, size of external objects, or passage of time (either speeding up or slowing down). Cause for AIWS is yet to be widely agreed, and the implications are widely varied. One of the research difficulties is the brevity of each episode, typically not exceeding few tens of minutes. This article presents a male adult in late 20s who has apparently experienced AIWS episodes since childhood, and infection has been ruled out. Reaction speed tests were conducted during and after AIWS episodes, across a span of 13 months. Statistically significant evidence is present for delayed response time during AIWS episodes when the patient claims to experience a sensation of time distortion: where events seem to move faster and people appear to speak quicker.


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