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dc.contributor.authorWall, Tony*
dc.contributor.authorCrawford-Lee, Mandy*
dc.date.accessioned2018-05-25T12:13:49Z
dc.date.available2018-05-25T12:13:49Z
dc.date.issued2018-08-13
dc.identifier.citationCrawford-Lee, M., & Wall, T. (2018). Sustainability 2030: a policy perspective from the University Vocational Awards Council. Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning, 8(3), 233-242.
dc.identifier.issn2042-3896
dc.identifier.doi10.1108/HESWBL-03-2018-0043
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/621152
dc.description.abstractPurpose: The policy and practice sphere of higher education, skills and work-based learning has become increasingly problematic in the last few years, and the extent to which sustainability and sustainable development are embedded in policy and practice spaces is a cause for concern. This paper posits a policy perspective from the University Vocational Awards Council (UVAC), the national representative organisation for universities committed to the vocational agenda and an independent voice in the sphere of higher education, skills and work-based learning. Design/methodology/approach: This paper is a reflective policy and practice piece which draws on the latest policy moves by the UK government and associated organisations and engages the latest literature to examine the issues in policy and practice that need to be tackled. Findings: This paper argues for a greater integration of sustainable development into higher education, skills and work-based learning policy and practice, and specifically in relation to (1) creating inclusive workplaces, (2) promoting social mobility, (3) a balanced approach to productivity, health and wellbeing, and (4) embedding educational approaches and methods which promote inequality in workplaces. Originality/value: The paper is the only UK policy perspective explicitly dedicated to sustainability and sustainable development in the context of the sphere of higher education, skills and work-based learning. Although it is focused on UK policy context, it will be of interest to international readers wishing to learn about UK developments and the sustainable development challenges in relation to its apprenticeship, technical and vocational education system.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherEmerald
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.emeraldinsight.com/loi/heswbl
dc.subjectVocational education and training
dc.subjectEducation policy
dc.subjectSustainability
dc.subjectSustainable development
dc.subjectWork based learning
dc.titleSustainability 2030: a policy perspective from the University Vocational Awards Council
dc.typeArticle
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Chester; University of Boltonen
dc.identifier.journalHigher Education, Skills and Work Based Learningen
dc.date.accepted2018-05-08
or.grant.openaccessYesen
rioxxterms.funderInternally fundeden
rioxxterms.identifier.projectQR Grant, Wall, 2016en
rioxxterms.versionAMen
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2018-08-13
html.description.abstractPurpose: The policy and practice sphere of higher education, skills and work-based learning has become increasingly problematic in the last few years, and the extent to which sustainability and sustainable development are embedded in policy and practice spaces is a cause for concern. This paper posits a policy perspective from the University Vocational Awards Council (UVAC), the national representative organisation for universities committed to the vocational agenda and an independent voice in the sphere of higher education, skills and work-based learning. Design/methodology/approach: This paper is a reflective policy and practice piece which draws on the latest policy moves by the UK government and associated organisations and engages the latest literature to examine the issues in policy and practice that need to be tackled. Findings: This paper argues for a greater integration of sustainable development into higher education, skills and work-based learning policy and practice, and specifically in relation to (1) creating inclusive workplaces, (2) promoting social mobility, (3) a balanced approach to productivity, health and wellbeing, and (4) embedding educational approaches and methods which promote inequality in workplaces. Originality/value: The paper is the only UK policy perspective explicitly dedicated to sustainability and sustainable development in the context of the sphere of higher education, skills and work-based learning. Although it is focused on UK policy context, it will be of interest to international readers wishing to learn about UK developments and the sustainable development challenges in relation to its apprenticeship, technical and vocational education system.


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