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dc.contributor.authorWee, M. Y. K.*
dc.contributor.authorIsaacs, R. A.*
dc.contributor.authorVaughan, Neil*
dc.contributor.authorDubey, V. N.*
dc.contributor.authorParker, B.*
dc.date.accessioned2018-05-17T14:43:32Z
dc.date.available2018-05-17T14:43:32Z
dc.date.issued2017-12-01
dc.identifier.citationWee, M. Y. K., Isaacs, R. A., Vaughan, N., Dubey, V. N., & Parker, B. (2017). Quantification of the pressures generated during insertion of an epidural needle in labouring women of varying body mass indices. International Journal of Clinical Anesthesia and Research, 1, 024-031. http://doi.org/10.29328/journal.hacr.1001004en
dc.identifier.issnNA
dc.identifier.doi10.29328/journal.hacr.1001004
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/621133
dc.descriptionHeighten Science Publications Corporation (HSPC) is pleased at the constructive and collaborative manner in which we are able to develop a liaison with University of Chester. HSPC is an Open Access publisher of scientific journals. As we continue to grow, HSPC along with the editors who help us run our Journals, continue to maintain the right balance between objectives of the scholars and long term sustainability for each of our journals. One of the important objective of any scholar is to reach more readers. HSPC helps to fulfil this objective by sharing your research and accomplishments to a wider audience and to make you more visible in your field. We are committed to provide hassle-free and rapid publication services to all the scholars. Please contact: info@heighpubs.us to know the appropriate journal for your research area. You can also visit: www.heighpubs.org/journals.php to choose a journal according to your research area of interest. HSPC wishes you a successful research career. Thank you!
dc.description.abstractObjective: The primary aim of this study was to measure pressure generated on a Tuohy needle during the epidural procedure in labouring women of varying body mass indices (BMI) with a view of utilising the data for the future development of a high fi delity epidural simulator. High-fi delity epidural simulators have a role in improving training and safety but current simulators lack a realistic experience and can be improved. Methods: This study was approved by the National Research Ethics Service Committee South Central, Portsmouth (REC reference 11/SC/0196). After informed consent epidural needle insertion pressure was measured using a Portex 16-gauge Tuohy needle, loss-of-resistance syringe, a three-way tap, pressure transducer and a custom-designed wireless transmitter. This was performed in four groups of labouring women, stratified according to BMI kg/m2: 18-24.9; 25-34.9; 35-44.9 and >=45. One-way ANOVA was used to compare difference in needle insertion pressure between the BMI groups. A paired t-test was performed between BMI group 18-24.9 and the three other BMI groups. Ultrasound images of the lumbar spine were undertaken prior to the epidural procedure and lumbar magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed within 72h post-delivery. These images will be used in the development of a high fi delity epidural simulator. Results: The mean epidural needle insertion pressure of labouring women with BMI 18-24.9 was 461mmHg; BMI 25-34.9 was 430mmHg; BMI 35-44.9 was 415mmHg and BMI >=45 was 376mmHg, (p=0.52). Conclusion: Although statistically insignifi cant, the study did show a decreasing trend of epidural insertion pressure with increasing body mass indices.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherHeighten Science Publicationsen
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.heighpubs.org/hacr/ijcar-aid1004.phpen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en
dc.subjectEpiduralen
dc.subjectEpidural Simulationen
dc.subjectSimulationen
dc.subjectObstetricianen
dc.subjectPressuresen
dc.titleQuantification of the pressures generated during insertion of an epidural needle in labouring women of varying body mass indicesen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Chester; Bournemouth University; Poole Hospital NHS Trust; West Hertfordshire NHS Trust; Southampton University Hospitalen
dc.identifier.journalInternational Journal of Clinical Anesthesia and Research
dc.internal.reviewer-noteChecking with research office. SMen
dc.date.accepted2017-11-30
or.grant.openaccessYesen
rioxxterms.funderUnfundeden
rioxxterms.identifier.projectUnfundeden
rioxxterms.versionVoRen
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2018-06-17
refterms.dateFCD2019-07-15T09:55:37Z
refterms.versionFCDVoR
refterms.dateFOA2018-06-17T00:00:00Z
html.description.abstractObjective: The primary aim of this study was to measure pressure generated on a Tuohy needle during the epidural procedure in labouring women of varying body mass indices (BMI) with a view of utilising the data for the future development of a high fi delity epidural simulator. High-fi delity epidural simulators have a role in improving training and safety but current simulators lack a realistic experience and can be improved. Methods: This study was approved by the National Research Ethics Service Committee South Central, Portsmouth (REC reference 11/SC/0196). After informed consent epidural needle insertion pressure was measured using a Portex 16-gauge Tuohy needle, loss-of-resistance syringe, a three-way tap, pressure transducer and a custom-designed wireless transmitter. This was performed in four groups of labouring women, stratified according to BMI kg/m2: 18-24.9; 25-34.9; 35-44.9 and >=45. One-way ANOVA was used to compare difference in needle insertion pressure between the BMI groups. A paired t-test was performed between BMI group 18-24.9 and the three other BMI groups. Ultrasound images of the lumbar spine were undertaken prior to the epidural procedure and lumbar magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed within 72h post-delivery. These images will be used in the development of a high fi delity epidural simulator. Results: The mean epidural needle insertion pressure of labouring women with BMI 18-24.9 was 461mmHg; BMI 25-34.9 was 430mmHg; BMI 35-44.9 was 415mmHg and BMI >=45 was 376mmHg, (p=0.52). Conclusion: Although statistically insignifi cant, the study did show a decreasing trend of epidural insertion pressure with increasing body mass indices.


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