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dc.contributor.authorFrancis, Suzanne*
dc.contributor.authorFagbadebo, Omololu*
dc.date.accessioned2018-04-25T16:30:47Z
dc.date.available2018-04-25T16:30:47Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.citationFagbadebo, O. & Francis, S. (2016). Power relations among institutions of good government in Nigeria's presidential system: Issues and contentions. International Journal of Politics and Good Governance 7(7), 1-22.en
dc.identifier.issn0976-1195
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/621105
dc.description.abstractThe principle of separation of powers and the doctrine of checks and balances are the two major mechanisms that define power relations among branches of government in presidential system. These institutional control measures are meant to avert disproportionate exercise of power. The assumption of the culture of presidential system is the near absence of personalization of power. In Nigeria, power relations among the three branches of government are clearly defined to ensure the promotion of good governance. Nevertheless, residual and inherent powers of the executive tower above the other two branches of government. This paper discovered that the uneven distribution of powers among the arms of government hampers the operation of a system of checks and balances. Thus, the institutional safety valves become ineffective in the face a rising culture of corruption and impunity. The outcome is the preponderance of governance crisis and abuse of state power. Competition for power among political elites endangers good governance. The paper submits that an informed public capable of enforcing accountability is a sine qua non for a redirection of the culture of accountability in Nigeria’s presidential system.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherInternational Journal of Politics and Good Governanceen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.onlineresearchjournals.com/ijopagg/index.phpen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/en
dc.subjectNigeriaen
dc.subjectpolitical institutionsen
dc.titlePower relations among institutions in Nigeria's Presidential System: Issues and Contentionsen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Chester; University of KwaZulu-Natalen
dc.identifier.journalInternational Journal of Politics and Good Governanceen
dc.internal.reviewer-noteProtected view in Word doc?en
dc.date.accepted2016-06-01
or.grant.openaccessYesen
rioxxterms.funderunfundeden
rioxxterms.identifier.projectunfunded researchen
rioxxterms.versionAMen
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2018-05-25
html.description.abstractThe principle of separation of powers and the doctrine of checks and balances are the two major mechanisms that define power relations among branches of government in presidential system. These institutional control measures are meant to avert disproportionate exercise of power. The assumption of the culture of presidential system is the near absence of personalization of power. In Nigeria, power relations among the three branches of government are clearly defined to ensure the promotion of good governance. Nevertheless, residual and inherent powers of the executive tower above the other two branches of government. This paper discovered that the uneven distribution of powers among the arms of government hampers the operation of a system of checks and balances. Thus, the institutional safety valves become ineffective in the face a rising culture of corruption and impunity. The outcome is the preponderance of governance crisis and abuse of state power. Competition for power among political elites endangers good governance. The paper submits that an informed public capable of enforcing accountability is a sine qua non for a redirection of the culture of accountability in Nigeria’s presidential system.


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