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dc.contributor.authorPalmer, Matthewen
dc.contributor.authorSauer, Jamesen
dc.contributor.authorHolt, Glenysen
dc.date.accessioned2018-04-12T14:03:10Z
dc.date.available2018-04-12T14:03:10Z
dc.date.issued2017-03
dc.identifier.citationPalmer, M. A., Sauer, J. D., & Holt, G. A. (2017). Undermining position effects in choices from arrays, with implications for police lineups. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Applied 23(1), 71-84.en
dc.identifier.doi10.1037/xap0000109
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/621082
dc.description©American Psychological Association, 2017. This paper is not the copy of record and may not exactly replicate the authoritative document published in the APA journal. Please do not copy or cite without author's permission. The final article is available, upon publication, at: https://doi.org/10.1037/xap0000109en
dc.description.abstractChoices from arrays are often characterized by position effects, such as edge-aversion. We investigated position effects when participants attempted to pick a suspect from an array similar to a police photo lineup. A reanalysis of data from 2 large-scale field studies showed that choices made under realistic conditions—closely matching eyewitness identification decisions in police investigations—displayed edge-aversion and bias to choose from the top row (Study 1). In a series of experiments (Studies 2a–2c and 3), participants guessing the location of a suspect exhibited edge-aversion regardless of whether the lineup was constructed to maximize the chances of the suspect being picked, to ensure the suspect did not stand out, or randomly. Participants favored top locations only when the lineup was constructed to maximize the chances of the suspect being picked. In Studies 4 and 5, position effects disappeared when (a) response options were presented in an array with no obvious center, edges, or corners, and (b) instructions stated that the suspect was placed randomly. These findings show that position effects are influenced by a combination of task instructions and array shape. Randomizing the location of the suspect and modifying the shape of the lineup array may reduce misidentification.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherAmerican Psychological Associationen
dc.relation.urlhttp://psycnet.apa.org/doiLanding?doi=10.1037%2Fxap0000109en
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en
dc.subjectchoice under uncertaintyen
dc.subjectposition effectsen
dc.subjectedge-aversionen
dc.subjecteyewitness identificationen
dc.subjectvisual arrayen
dc.titleUndermining position effects in choices from arrays, with implications for police lineupsen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.eissn1939-2192
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Tasmania; University of Chesteren
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Experimental Psychology: Applieden
dc.date.accepted2016-10-01
or.grant.openaccessYesen
rioxxterms.funderAustralian Research Councilen
rioxxterms.identifier.projectDP0556876en
rioxxterms.identifier.projectDP1093210en
rioxxterms.identifier.projectDP140103746en
rioxxterms.versionAMen
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2018-04-12
refterms.dateFOA2018-08-13T19:30:05Z
html.description.abstractChoices from arrays are often characterized by position effects, such as edge-aversion. We investigated position effects when participants attempted to pick a suspect from an array similar to a police photo lineup. A reanalysis of data from 2 large-scale field studies showed that choices made under realistic conditions—closely matching eyewitness identification decisions in police investigations—displayed edge-aversion and bias to choose from the top row (Study 1). In a series of experiments (Studies 2a–2c and 3), participants guessing the location of a suspect exhibited edge-aversion regardless of whether the lineup was constructed to maximize the chances of the suspect being picked, to ensure the suspect did not stand out, or randomly. Participants favored top locations only when the lineup was constructed to maximize the chances of the suspect being picked. In Studies 4 and 5, position effects disappeared when (a) response options were presented in an array with no obvious center, edges, or corners, and (b) instructions stated that the suspect was placed randomly. These findings show that position effects are influenced by a combination of task instructions and array shape. Randomizing the location of the suspect and modifying the shape of the lineup array may reduce misidentification.


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