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dc.contributor.authorParker, Nicola*
dc.contributor.authorO'Reilly, Michelle*
dc.date.accessioned2018-03-27T15:26:43Z
dc.date.available2018-03-27T15:26:43Z
dc.date.issued2012-08-01
dc.identifier.citationParker, N., & O'Reilly, M. (2012). ‘Gossiping' as a social action in family therapy: The pseudo-absence and pseudo-presence of children. Discourse Studies, 14(4), 457-475. https://doi.org/10.1177/1461445612452976en
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/1461445612452976
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/621047
dc.descriptionParker, N., & O'Reilly, M. (2012). ‘Gossiping' as a social action in family therapy: The pseudo-absence and pseudo-presence of children. Discourse Studies, 14(4), 457-475. https://doi.org/10.1177/1461445612452976. Copyright © 2012 SAGE. Reprinted by permission of SAGE Publications.en
dc.description.abstractFamily therapists face a number of challenges in their work. When children are present in family therapy they can and do make fleeting contributions. We draw upon naturally occurring family therapy sessions to explore the ‘pseudo-presence’ and ‘pseudo-absence’ of children and the institutional ‘gossiping’ quality these interactions have. Our findings illustrate that a core characteristic of gossiping is its functional role in building alignments’ which in this institutional context is utilized as a way of managing accountability. Our findings have a number of implications for clinical professionals and highlight the value of discourse and conversation analysis techniques for exploring therapeutic interactions.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherSageen
dc.relation.urlhttp://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/1461445612452976en
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en
dc.subjectAccountabilityen
dc.subjectFamily therapyen
dc.subjectMental healthen
dc.subjectGossipingen
dc.subjectChildren, conversation analysisen
dc.subjectDiscourseen
dc.title‘Gossiping' as a social action in family therapy: The pseudo-absence and pseudo-presence of childrenen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.eissn1461-7080
dc.contributor.departmentBirmingham and Solihull Mental Health Foundation Trust; University of Leicesteren
dc.identifier.journalDiscourse Studiesen
dc.internal.reviewer-noteE-mailed Nikki to confirm version 9/3/18en
dc.date.accepted2012-06-18
or.grant.openaccessYesen
rioxxterms.funderUnfundeden
rioxxterms.identifier.projectUnfundeden
rioxxterms.versionAMen
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2012-08-01
refterms.dateFOA2018-08-13T13:51:59Z
html.description.abstractFamily therapists face a number of challenges in their work. When children are present in family therapy they can and do make fleeting contributions. We draw upon naturally occurring family therapy sessions to explore the ‘pseudo-presence’ and ‘pseudo-absence’ of children and the institutional ‘gossiping’ quality these interactions have. Our findings illustrate that a core characteristic of gossiping is its functional role in building alignments’ which in this institutional context is utilized as a way of managing accountability. Our findings have a number of implications for clinical professionals and highlight the value of discourse and conversation analysis techniques for exploring therapeutic interactions.


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