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dc.contributor.authorFrancis, Suzanne*
dc.contributor.authorEmser, Monique*
dc.date.accessioned2018-03-23T12:27:08Z
dc.date.available2018-03-23T12:27:08Z
dc.date.issued2014-11
dc.identifier.citationEmser, M. & Francis, S. (2014). Media waves and moral panicking: The case of the FIFA World Cup 2010. Strategic Review for Southern Africa. 36(2), 169-180.en
dc.identifier.issn1013-1108
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/621019
dc.description.abstractAs with previous international sporting events, the threat of human trafficking quickly became part of public consciousness during the lead up to the World Cup. Out of 350 articles covering human trafficking in South African newspapers between 2006 and 2010, 82 (or 24 per cent) directly linked this sporting event with human trafficking. We claim that media hypes based on constructed moral panics might be recycled in similar scenarios to that displayed during the FIFA World Cup, demonstrating the staying power of such media hypes and the utility of moral panics.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherDepartment of Political Sciences, University of Pretoriaen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.up.ac.za/en/political-sciences/article/19718/strategic-review-for-southern-africaen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/en
dc.subjecthuman traffickingen
dc.subjectAfricaen
dc.subjectWorld Cupen
dc.subjectmoral panicen
dc.subjectmediaen
dc.titleMedia waves and moral panicking: The case of the FIFA World Cup 2010en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Chester; University of KwaZulu-Natalen
dc.identifier.journalStrategic Review for Southern Africaen
dc.date.accepted2014-06-01
or.grant.openaccessYesen
rioxxterms.funderunfundeden
rioxxterms.identifier.projectunfundeden
rioxxterms.versionAMen
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2018-03-26
refterms.dateFOA2018-08-13T18:59:20Z
html.description.abstractAs with previous international sporting events, the threat of human trafficking quickly became part of public consciousness during the lead up to the World Cup. Out of 350 articles covering human trafficking in South African newspapers between 2006 and 2010, 82 (or 24 per cent) directly linked this sporting event with human trafficking. We claim that media hypes based on constructed moral panics might be recycled in similar scenarios to that displayed during the FIFA World Cup, demonstrating the staying power of such media hypes and the utility of moral panics.


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