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dc.contributor.authorFrancis, Suzanne*
dc.contributor.authorFrancis, Michael*
dc.date.accessioned2018-03-23T11:12:01Z
dc.date.available2018-03-23T11:12:01Z
dc.date.issued2010-07-19
dc.identifier.citationFrancis, M., & Francis, S. (2010). Representation and Misrepresentation: San regional advocacy and the Global imagery. Critical Arts, 24(2), 210-227. https://doi.org/10.1080/02560041003786490en
dc.identifier.issn0256-0046
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/02560041003786490
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/621016
dc.descriptionThis is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Critical Arts on 19/07/2010, available online: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/02560041003786490en
dc.description.abstractThe San of southern Africa are one of the most represented peoples of southern Africa. Internationally, they are most often depicted as a hunting-gathering people or as a people recently removed from that way of life. Organisations such as Survival International draw on these images for political advocacy and in campaigns for land rights for indigenous peoples. In southern Africa, San organisations fight for similar rights and, despite their membership being comprised of San people, the images and ideas of San-ness are dominated by the global imagery. The images and ideas of the San draw on racialised caricatures and colonial imagery that freeze San imagery into a mythologised past. We argue that this is a limiting factor in political advocacy that constrains the types of responses possible for aboriginal rights in Africa.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherTaylor & Francisen
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/02560041003786490en
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/en
dc.subject"Bushmen"en
dc.subjectCultural Studiesen
dc.subjectRepresentationen
dc.subjectIndigeneityen
dc.titleRepresentation and Misrepresentation: San regional advocacy and the Global imageryen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.eissn1992-6049
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Chester; University of KwaZulu-Natalen
dc.identifier.journalCritical Artsen
dc.date.accepted2010-01-01
or.grant.openaccessYesen
rioxxterms.funderUnfundeden
rioxxterms.identifier.projectUnfundeden
rioxxterms.versionAMen
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2210-07-19
refterms.dateFOA2018-08-13T12:28:30Z
html.description.abstractThe San of southern Africa are one of the most represented peoples of southern Africa. Internationally, they are most often depicted as a hunting-gathering people or as a people recently removed from that way of life. Organisations such as Survival International draw on these images for political advocacy and in campaigns for land rights for indigenous peoples. In southern Africa, San organisations fight for similar rights and, despite their membership being comprised of San people, the images and ideas of San-ness are dominated by the global imagery. The images and ideas of the San draw on racialised caricatures and colonial imagery that freeze San imagery into a mythologised past. We argue that this is a limiting factor in political advocacy that constrains the types of responses possible for aboriginal rights in Africa.


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