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dc.contributor.authorParker, Nicola*
dc.contributor.authorO'Reilly, Michelle*
dc.date.accessioned2018-03-21T13:58:55Z
dc.date.available2018-03-21T13:58:55Z
dc.date.issued2013-03-06
dc.identifier.citationParker, N., & O'Reilly, M. (2013). Reflections from behind the screen: avoiding therapeutic rupture when utilising reflecting teams. The Family Journal: Counseling for Couples and Families, 21(2), 170-179. https://doi.org/10.1177/1066480712466810en
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/1066480712466810
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/621000
dc.descriptionParker, N., & O'Reilly, M. (2013). Reflections from behind the screen: avoiding therapeutic rupture when utilising reflecting teams. The Family Journal: Counseling for Couples and Families, 21(2), 170-179. https://doi.org/10.1177/1066480712466810. Copyright © 2013 SAGE. Reprinted by permission of SAGE Publications.en
dc.description.abstractSince Tom Andersen developed the use of reflecting teams to facilitate the progress and process of family therapy, little empirical evidence has emerged regarding their effectiveness or use in therapeutic practice. Reflecting teams are typically embraced by family therapists as a positive mechanism for enhancing practice and thus it is important that research explores how they are utilized. In this article, we draw upon videotaped data of naturally occurring family therapy from the United Kingdom. Using conversation analysis, we identified three performative actions related to interrupting the therapeutic conversation to consult with a reflecting team. We found that therapists had difficulty exiting therapy, that on some occasions exit was hindered, and that there were disturbances in feeding back the reflections of the team. By examining the use of teams in real practice, we were able to make a number of recommendations for practicing family therapists to facilitate the use of this valuable resource.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherSageen
dc.relation.urlhttp://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/1066480712466810en
dc.subjectReflecting Teamen
dc.subjectTherapeutic ruptureen
dc.subjectConversation Analysisen
dc.subjectNaturally occurring dataen
dc.titleReflections from behind the screen: avoiding therapeutic rupture when utilising reflecting teamsen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.eissn1552-3950
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Chester; University of Leicesteren
dc.identifier.journalThe Family Journalen
dc.internal.reviewer-noteE-mailed Nikki to confirm version 9/3/18en
dc.date.accepted2012-12-12
or.grant.openaccessYesen
rioxxterms.funderUnfundeden
rioxxterms.identifier.projectUnfundeden
rioxxterms.versionAMen
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2013-03-06
refterms.dateFOA2018-08-13T18:38:36Z
html.description.abstractSince Tom Andersen developed the use of reflecting teams to facilitate the progress and process of family therapy, little empirical evidence has emerged regarding their effectiveness or use in therapeutic practice. Reflecting teams are typically embraced by family therapists as a positive mechanism for enhancing practice and thus it is important that research explores how they are utilized. In this article, we draw upon videotaped data of naturally occurring family therapy from the United Kingdom. Using conversation analysis, we identified three performative actions related to interrupting the therapeutic conversation to consult with a reflecting team. We found that therapists had difficulty exiting therapy, that on some occasions exit was hindered, and that there were disturbances in feeding back the reflections of the team. By examining the use of teams in real practice, we were able to make a number of recommendations for practicing family therapists to facilitate the use of this valuable resource.


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