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dc.contributor.authorKiyimba, Nikkien
dc.date.accessioned2018-03-21T12:42:38Z
dc.date.available2018-03-21T12:42:38Z
dc.date.issued2015-09-02
dc.identifier.citationKiyimba, N. (2015). The Value of Discourse Analysis: A Clinical Psychologist’s View. In M. O’Reilly, & J. N. Lester (Eds.), The Palgrave handbook of child mental health: Discourse and conversation studies (pp. 42-58). London, United Kingdom: Palgrave.en
dc.identifier.isbn9781137428318
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/620996
dc.description.abstractAs a discipline, Clinical Psychology has historically favoured a positivist approach to understanding human behaviour, and clinical psychological practice has been largely informed by research based on quantitative methods. Psychologists have tended to exploit the methodologies of the natural sciences by measuring phenomena (Peters, 2010). This bias towards quantitative research may at least in part be a function of how the discipline of psychology has from its genesis, been careful to define itself as a science. It seems that the development of a broader engagement with alternative methods has largely grown from challenges to psychology’s conception of what constitutes science, and debates regarding its merits developed in relation to our thinking about science (Biggerstaff, 2012). The growth of qualitative methods in psychology is therefore relatively new despite the rich history of the approach (Howitt, 2010). However, now that psychology is more securely established, this has begun to lead to a refreshing openness to embrace qualitative process methodology as well as outcome research.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherPalgrave Macmillanen
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.palgrave.com/us/book/9781137428301en
dc.subjectClinical Psychologyen
dc.subjectQualitative Researchen
dc.subjectDiscourse Analysisen
dc.titleThe Value of Discourse Analysis: A Clinical Psychologist’s View.en
dc.typeBook chapteren
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Chesteren
dc.date.accepted2014-08-31
or.grant.openaccessYesen
rioxxterms.funderUnfundeden
rioxxterms.identifier.projectUnfundeden
rioxxterms.versionAMen
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2215-09-02
html.description.abstractAs a discipline, Clinical Psychology has historically favoured a positivist approach to understanding human behaviour, and clinical psychological practice has been largely informed by research based on quantitative methods. Psychologists have tended to exploit the methodologies of the natural sciences by measuring phenomena (Peters, 2010). This bias towards quantitative research may at least in part be a function of how the discipline of psychology has from its genesis, been careful to define itself as a science. It seems that the development of a broader engagement with alternative methods has largely grown from challenges to psychology’s conception of what constitutes science, and debates regarding its merits developed in relation to our thinking about science (Biggerstaff, 2012). The growth of qualitative methods in psychology is therefore relatively new despite the rich history of the approach (Howitt, 2010). However, now that psychology is more securely established, this has begun to lead to a refreshing openness to embrace qualitative process methodology as well as outcome research.


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