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dc.contributor.advisorKennedy, Lynneen
dc.contributor.authorMcGregor, Linda J.*
dc.date.accessioned2018-03-19T16:27:23Z
dc.date.available2018-03-19T16:27:23Z
dc.date.issued2017-08-31
dc.identifier.citationMcGregor, L. (2017). Living with Multiple Sclerosis – a qualitative study on the effects of physical activity on quality of life (Master's thesis). University of Chester, United Kingdom.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/620991
dc.description.abstractObjective: To examine the effect of exercise on quality of life and investigate the perceived barriers to exercise participation. Methods: A qualitative study using semi-structured one-to-one interviews on 12 participants with multiple sclerosis. Results: Five qualitative themes were identified: environmental, personal, knowledge, quality of life, and taking control. Participants felt that discussing the benefits of physical activity engagement with a health professional and addressing problems such as transport would be helpful strategies for exercise engagement. All participants perceived that physical activity helped with quality of life. Conclusions: These findings indicate that exercise therapy is beneficial to quality of life and that physical activity should be promoted by the neurologist at diagnosis.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherUniversity of Chesteren
dc.subjectMultiple Sclerosisen
dc.subjectphysical activityen
dc.subjectquality of lifeen
dc.titleLiving with Multiple Sclerosis – exploring the effects of physical activity on quality of lifeen
dc.typeThesis or dissertationen
dc.type.qualificationnameMScen
dc.type.qualificationlevelMasters Degreeen
html.description.abstractObjective: To examine the effect of exercise on quality of life and investigate the perceived barriers to exercise participation. Methods: A qualitative study using semi-structured one-to-one interviews on 12 participants with multiple sclerosis. Results: Five qualitative themes were identified: environmental, personal, knowledge, quality of life, and taking control. Participants felt that discussing the benefits of physical activity engagement with a health professional and addressing problems such as transport would be helpful strategies for exercise engagement. All participants perceived that physical activity helped with quality of life. Conclusions: These findings indicate that exercise therapy is beneficial to quality of life and that physical activity should be promoted by the neurologist at diagnosis.


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