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dc.contributor.authorFleet, Doreen*
dc.contributor.authorDasGupta, Mari*
dc.contributor.authorReeves, Andrew*
dc.contributor.authorBurton, Amy*
dc.date.accessioned2018-03-19T15:40:18Z
dc.date.available2018-03-19T15:40:18Z
dc.date.issued2016-08-03
dc.identifier.citationFleet, D., Burton, A., Reeves, A. & DasGupta, M. P. (2016). A case for taking the dual role of counsellor-researcher in qualitative research. Qualitative Research in Psychology. 13(4) pp: 328-346en
dc.identifier.issn1478-0887
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/14780887.2016.1205694
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/620985
dc.descriptionThis is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Qualitative Research in Psychology on 3rd August 2016, available online: https://doi.org/10.1080/14780887.2016.1205694en
dc.description.abstractThere is ongoing debate about whether the challenges of practice-based research in counselling, with clients’ discourses providing the raw data, can be overcome. This article begins by considering the argument of whether taking a dual role of counsellor-researcher within case study research is a legitimate qualitative approach. A case example using sand-tray in short-term therapy with adults from a pluralistic perspective is provided to demonstrate how the challenges of the dual role can be managed to produce effective research findings. It is suggested that this approach closes the gap between research and practice to produce findings that are highly relevant to the counselling context. The ethical considerations of taking a dual role of counsellor-researcher are considered, and opportunities and challenges when adopting this approach are identified.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherTaylor & Francisen
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/14780887.2016.1205694en
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/en
dc.subjectcounsellingen
dc.subjectpsychotherapyen
dc.subjectpractitioner researchen
dc.subjectqualitative researchen
dc.titleA case for taking the dual role of counsellor-researcher in qualitative researchen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.eissn1478-0895
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Staffordshire; University of Chesteren
dc.identifier.journalQualitative Research in Psychologyen
dc.internal.reviewer-noteE-mailed to confirm version 19-3-18en
dc.date.accepted2016-05-10
or.grant.openaccessYesen
rioxxterms.funderunfundeden
rioxxterms.identifier.projectunfundeden
rioxxterms.versionAMen
rioxxterms.versionofrecordhttps://doi.org/10.1080/14780887.2016.1205694
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2017-08-03
html.description.abstractThere is ongoing debate about whether the challenges of practice-based research in counselling, with clients’ discourses providing the raw data, can be overcome. This article begins by considering the argument of whether taking a dual role of counsellor-researcher within case study research is a legitimate qualitative approach. A case example using sand-tray in short-term therapy with adults from a pluralistic perspective is provided to demonstrate how the challenges of the dual role can be managed to produce effective research findings. It is suggested that this approach closes the gap between research and practice to produce findings that are highly relevant to the counselling context. The ethical considerations of taking a dual role of counsellor-researcher are considered, and opportunities and challenges when adopting this approach are identified.
rioxxterms.publicationdate2016-08-03


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