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dc.contributor.advisorBoulton, Mikeen
dc.contributor.authorSimpson, Hannah*
dc.date.accessioned2018-03-15T15:35:42Z
dc.date.available2018-03-15T15:35:42Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.citationSimpson, H. (2017). Can Friendship Quality, Resilience, Social Anxiety and Victimisation Predict Self-Esteem? (Master's thesis). University of Chester, United Kingdom.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/620957
dc.description.abstractSelf-esteem is regarded as being fundamental for child and adolescent development. Self-esteem has been found to be at its lowest among young people and tends to fluctuate throughout adolescence. Despite this, little is known about the specific factors which may lead to a change in levels of self-esteem among youths. Current research aimed to investigate the relationship between four predictor variables (friendship quality, resilience, Social Anxiety and victimisation) and the dependent variable (self-esteem). Data was collected from school students aged between 10 and 16 years, from various schools across the United Kingdom. Students’ completed and online questionnaire, responding to statements using a Likert-scale response system. Data was analysed using a multiple regression, which was used to examine whether as a collection, the predictor variables could predict self-esteem. Which was followed by a series of four hierarchical multiple regression tests. The hierarchical regression tests allowed researchers to examine the unique contribution each predictor variable made towards the variance shared with self-esteem. Social Anxiety was found to be the most important unique predictor of self-esteem, accounting for 6% of the variance. It was therefore highlighted that Social Anxiety should be the first factor schools consider in their attempts to increase student levels of self-esteem. Intervention needs to be tailored towards individual needs. Future research should include moderation analyses in order to examine the relationship between the predictor variables and dependent variable (for example, age and gender).
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherUniversity of Chesteren
dc.subjectFriendshipen
dc.subjectresilienceen
dc.subjectSocial anxietyen
dc.subjectVictimisationen
dc.subjectSelf-esteemen
dc.titleCan Friendship Quality, Resilience, Social Anxiety and Victimisation Predict Self-Esteem?en
dc.typeThesis or dissertationen
dc.type.qualificationnameMScen
dc.type.qualificationlevelMasters Degreeen
refterms.dateFOA2018-08-13T21:27:44Z
html.description.abstractSelf-esteem is regarded as being fundamental for child and adolescent development. Self-esteem has been found to be at its lowest among young people and tends to fluctuate throughout adolescence. Despite this, little is known about the specific factors which may lead to a change in levels of self-esteem among youths. Current research aimed to investigate the relationship between four predictor variables (friendship quality, resilience, Social Anxiety and victimisation) and the dependent variable (self-esteem). Data was collected from school students aged between 10 and 16 years, from various schools across the United Kingdom. Students’ completed and online questionnaire, responding to statements using a Likert-scale response system. Data was analysed using a multiple regression, which was used to examine whether as a collection, the predictor variables could predict self-esteem. Which was followed by a series of four hierarchical multiple regression tests. The hierarchical regression tests allowed researchers to examine the unique contribution each predictor variable made towards the variance shared with self-esteem. Social Anxiety was found to be the most important unique predictor of self-esteem, accounting for 6% of the variance. It was therefore highlighted that Social Anxiety should be the first factor schools consider in their attempts to increase student levels of self-esteem. Intervention needs to be tailored towards individual needs. Future research should include moderation analyses in order to examine the relationship between the predictor variables and dependent variable (for example, age and gender).


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