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dc.contributor.authorFrancis, Suzanne*
dc.contributor.authorEmser, Monique*
dc.date.accessioned2018-03-14T16:49:11Z
dc.date.available2018-03-14T16:49:11Z
dc.date.issued2017-04-04
dc.identifier.citationEmser, M., & Francis, S. (2017). Counter-trafficking governance in South Africa: an analysis of the role of the KwaZulu-Natal human trafficking, prostitution, pornography and brothels task team. Journal of Contemporary African Studies, 35(2), 190-211.en
dc.identifier.issn0258-9001
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/02589001.2017.1309363
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/620949
dc.descriptionThis is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Journal of Contemporary African Studies on 4-4-17, available online: https://doi.org/10.1080/02589001.2017.1309363en
dc.description.abstractDetermining the efficacy of available counter-trafficking strategies is just as important as understanding the phenomenon of human trafficking itself. This is so if anti-trafficking practitioners wish to make in-roads in preventing and combating human trafficking in South Africa. At the heart of the matter are the ways in which counter-trafficking governance is structured in the South African context. In this article we use the KwaZulu-Natal intersectoral task team, an un-resourced agency of provincial government mandated to prevent and combat human trafficking, as a case study to analyse the ‘4P model’ of counter-trafficking favoured in South Africa. We find that while such an integrated model has great potential, issues of institutional cooperation and coordination, pervasive public official corruption and budgetary constraints hamper its current impact and efficacy. We conclude that these issues must be addressed by South African policy-makers once legislation has been promulgated.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherTaylor & Francisen
dc.relation.ispartofseries35en
dc.relation.ispartofseries2en
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/02589001.2017.1309363en
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en
dc.subjecthuman traffickingen
dc.subjectSouth Africaen
dc.subjectcounter-trafficking governanceen
dc.subjectKwaZulu-Natalen
dc.titleCounter-trafficking governance in South Africa: an analysis of the role of the KwaZulu-Natal human trafficking, prostitution, pornography and brothels task team.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.eissn1469-9397
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Chester; University of KwaZulu-Natalen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Contemporary African Studiesen
dc.date.accepted2017-01-20
or.grant.openaccessYesen
rioxxterms.funderunfundeden
rioxxterms.identifier.projectunfundeden
rioxxterms.versionAMen
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2018-10-04
html.description.abstractDetermining the efficacy of available counter-trafficking strategies is just as important as understanding the phenomenon of human trafficking itself. This is so if anti-trafficking practitioners wish to make in-roads in preventing and combating human trafficking in South Africa. At the heart of the matter are the ways in which counter-trafficking governance is structured in the South African context. In this article we use the KwaZulu-Natal intersectoral task team, an un-resourced agency of provincial government mandated to prevent and combat human trafficking, as a case study to analyse the ‘4P model’ of counter-trafficking favoured in South Africa. We find that while such an integrated model has great potential, issues of institutional cooperation and coordination, pervasive public official corruption and budgetary constraints hamper its current impact and efficacy. We conclude that these issues must be addressed by South African policy-makers once legislation has been promulgated.


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