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dc.contributor.authorO’Reilly, Michelle*
dc.contributor.authorKiyimba, Nikki*
dc.contributor.authorKarim, Khalid*
dc.date.accessioned2018-03-14T15:04:43Z
dc.date.available2018-03-14T15:04:43Z
dc.date.issued2016-08-08
dc.identifier.citationO’Reilly, M., Kiyimba, N., & Karim, K. (2016). “This is a question we have to ask everyone”: asking young people about self-harm and suicide. Journal of Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing, 23(8), 479-488. http://doi.org/10.1111/jpm.12323en
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/jpm.12323
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/620947
dc.descriptionThis is the peer reviewed version of the following article: O’Reilly, M., Kiyimba, N., & Karim, K. (2016). “This is a question we have to ask everyone”: asking young people about self-harm and suicide. Journal of Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing, 23(8), 479-488. http://doi.org/10.1111/jpm.12323, which has been published in final form at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/jpm.12323/abstract. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Self-Archivingen
dc.description.abstractIntroduction: Questions about self-harm and suicide are essential in risk assessments with children and young people, yet little is known about how mental health practitioners do this. Aim: The core aim was to examine how questions about self-harm and suicidal ideation are asked in real-world practice. Method: A qualitative design was employed to analyse 28 video-recorded naturally occurring mental health assessments in a child and adolescent mental health service. Data were analysed using conversation analysis (CA). Results: In 13 cases young people were asked about self-harm and suicide, but 15 were not. Analysis revealed how practitioners asked these questions. Two main styles were revealed. First was an incremental approach, beginning with inquiries about emotions and behaviours, building to asking about self-harm and suicidal intent. Second was to externalize the question as being required by outside agencies. Discussion: The study concluded that the design of risk questions to young people had implications for how open they were to engaging with the practitioner. Implications for practice: The study has implications for training and practice for psychiatric nurses and other mental health practitioners in feeling more confident in communicating with young people about self-harm and suicidal ideation.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherWileyen
dc.relation.urlhttp://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/jpm.12323/abstracten
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/en
dc.subjectSuicideen
dc.subjectQuestionsen
dc.subjectAssessmenten
dc.subjectChilden
dc.subjectMental healthen
dc.subjectSelf-harmen
dc.title“This is a question we have to ask everyone”: asking young people about self-harm and suicideen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.eissn1365-2850
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Chester; Leicester Universityen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursingen
dc.internal.reviewer-noteE-mailed Nikki to confirm version 9/3/18en
dc.date.accepted2016-06-14
or.grant.openaccessYesen
rioxxterms.funderUnfundeden
rioxxterms.identifier.projectUnfundeden
rioxxterms.versionAMen
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2016-08-06
refterms.dateFOA2018-08-13T22:38:36Z
html.description.abstractIntroduction: Questions about self-harm and suicide are essential in risk assessments with children and young people, yet little is known about how mental health practitioners do this. Aim: The core aim was to examine how questions about self-harm and suicidal ideation are asked in real-world practice. Method: A qualitative design was employed to analyse 28 video-recorded naturally occurring mental health assessments in a child and adolescent mental health service. Data were analysed using conversation analysis (CA). Results: In 13 cases young people were asked about self-harm and suicide, but 15 were not. Analysis revealed how practitioners asked these questions. Two main styles were revealed. First was an incremental approach, beginning with inquiries about emotions and behaviours, building to asking about self-harm and suicidal intent. Second was to externalize the question as being required by outside agencies. Discussion: The study concluded that the design of risk questions to young people had implications for how open they were to engaging with the practitioner. Implications for practice: The study has implications for training and practice for psychiatric nurses and other mental health practitioners in feeling more confident in communicating with young people about self-harm and suicidal ideation.


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