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dc.contributor.authorMiller, Servel*
dc.contributor.authorDegg, Martin*
dc.date.accessioned2018-03-13T14:07:00Z
dc.date.available2018-03-13T14:07:00Z
dc.date.issued2015-05-01
dc.identifier.citationMiller, S., & Degg, M. (2015). Geographical Information Systems (GIS) applied to landslide hazard zonation in the North Wales coalfield. In R. Bevins, D. Nichol, & M. G. Bassett (Eds.), Urban Geology in Wales: 4. Cardiff, United Kingdom: National Museum of Wales.,en
dc.identifier.isbn9780720006322
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/620927
dc.description.abstractIn areas with a history of slope instability problems, landslide hazard zonation is increasingly becoming an integral tool in the effective management of this hazard (Chauhan et al., 2010; Leventhal and Kotze, 2008; Fells et al., 2008; Moreiras, 2005). Landslide hazard zonation provides the scientific basis for the implementation of land-use, emergency management and loss reduction measures in landslide-prone areas (Haubin et al., 2005). Although such techniques are commonly used worldwide in the management of slope instability, their use has been limited in the UK to a number of localised studies; e.g. South Wales coalfield (Halcrow and Partners, 1989) and Derbyshire Peak District (Thurston, 1997). It has been recognised that there are numerous relict landslides throughout the UK, which are being reactivated due to climatic factors (Arnell and Reynard 1996; Collison, 2000; and Environmental Agency, 2010) as well as land-use changes (Norbury, 2002; Smith, 2002). As indicated by Glade (2003, p3) ‘Land-use change has been recognized throughout the world as one of the most important factors influencing the occurrence of rainfall-triggered landslides’. Hazard mapping and susceptibility modelling (zonation) in landslide-prone areas should be a vital component of land-use planning, particularly where development continues to spread onto slopes deemed unstable. This paper outlines the development of a landslide susceptibility zonation model for areas of solid geology in the North Wales Coalfield and Halkyn Mountain. The model has been validated and has the potential to be utilised in land-use planning at a local and regional level
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherNational Museum Walesen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesGeological Series, No. 27en
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/en
dc.subjectLandslideen
dc.subjectNorthwalesen
dc.subjectGISen
dc.subjectSusceptibilityen
dc.titleGeographical Information Systems (GIS) applied to landslide hazard zonation in the North Wales coalfielden
dc.typeBook chapteren
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Chesteren
dc.date.accepted2015-02-01
or.grant.openaccessYesen
rioxxterms.funderGladstone Fellowship- University of Chester- 2003en
rioxxterms.identifier.projectinternally funded researchen
rioxxterms.versionAMen
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2215-05-01
html.description.abstractIn areas with a history of slope instability problems, landslide hazard zonation is increasingly becoming an integral tool in the effective management of this hazard (Chauhan et al., 2010; Leventhal and Kotze, 2008; Fells et al., 2008; Moreiras, 2005). Landslide hazard zonation provides the scientific basis for the implementation of land-use, emergency management and loss reduction measures in landslide-prone areas (Haubin et al., 2005). Although such techniques are commonly used worldwide in the management of slope instability, their use has been limited in the UK to a number of localised studies; e.g. South Wales coalfield (Halcrow and Partners, 1989) and Derbyshire Peak District (Thurston, 1997). It has been recognised that there are numerous relict landslides throughout the UK, which are being reactivated due to climatic factors (Arnell and Reynard 1996; Collison, 2000; and Environmental Agency, 2010) as well as land-use changes (Norbury, 2002; Smith, 2002). As indicated by Glade (2003, p3) ‘Land-use change has been recognized throughout the world as one of the most important factors influencing the occurrence of rainfall-triggered landslides’. Hazard mapping and susceptibility modelling (zonation) in landslide-prone areas should be a vital component of land-use planning, particularly where development continues to spread onto slopes deemed unstable. This paper outlines the development of a landslide susceptibility zonation model for areas of solid geology in the North Wales Coalfield and Halkyn Mountain. The model has been validated and has the potential to be utilised in land-use planning at a local and regional level


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