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dc.contributor.authorHorsley, Mark*
dc.date.accessioned2018-02-27T17:42:27Z
dc.date.available2018-02-27T17:42:27Z
dc.date.issued2017-08-13
dc.identifier.citationHorsley, M. (2017). Forget ‘Moral Panics’. Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Criminology, 9(2), 84-98.en
dc.identifier.issn2166-8094
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/620884
dc.descriptionThis document is the Accepted Manuscript version of a published work that appeared in final form in Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Criminology. To access the final edited and published work see http://jtpcrim.org/.en
dc.description.abstractIn the spirit of Jean Baudrillard’s Forget Foucault this article offers a step-by-step critique of the ‘moral panic’ concept. It begins with a short review of Cohen’s original thesis and its gradual evolution before addressing its remarkable popularity and its ascent to the stature of a domain assumption. The rest of the article uses and extends the existing critique of moral panic theory before arriving at the conclusion that, rather than undergo another period of adaptation, the entire conceptual repertoire of ‘moral panics’ should be ditched to make way for much-needed innovation.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherDavid Polizzien
dc.relation.urlhttp://jtpcrim.org/en
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/en
dc.subjectMoral panicen
dc.subjectObjectless Anxietyen
dc.subjectHarmen
dc.subjectRealismen
dc.subjectSocial Constructionismen
dc.titleForget ‘Moral Panics’en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentTeeside Universityen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Theoretical and Philosophical Criminologyen
dc.date.accepted2017-08-01
or.grant.openaccessYesen
rioxxterms.funderUnfundeden
rioxxterms.identifier.projectUnfundeden
rioxxterms.versionAMen
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2018-03-27
refterms.dateFOA2018-03-27T00:00:00Z
html.description.abstractIn the spirit of Jean Baudrillard’s Forget Foucault this article offers a step-by-step critique of the ‘moral panic’ concept. It begins with a short review of Cohen’s original thesis and its gradual evolution before addressing its remarkable popularity and its ascent to the stature of a domain assumption. The rest of the article uses and extends the existing critique of moral panic theory before arriving at the conclusion that, rather than undergo another period of adaptation, the entire conceptual repertoire of ‘moral panics’ should be ditched to make way for much-needed innovation.


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