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dc.contributor.authorCarey, Malcolm*
dc.contributor.authorPrynallt-Jones, Katherine A.*
dc.date.accessioned2018-01-24T13:24:07Z
dc.date.available2018-01-24T13:24:07Z
dc.date.issued2018-02-09
dc.identifier.citationCarey, M., & Jones, K. P. (2018). Using codes of ethics for disabled children who communicate non-verbally - some challenges and implications for social workers. Ethics and Social Welfare, 12(1), 78-83. https://doi.org/10.1080/17496535.2018.1430159
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/17496535.2018.1430159
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/620813
dc.descriptionThis is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Ethics and Social Welfare on 09/02/2018, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/17496535.2018.1430159
dc.description.abstractThis article evaluates the use of professional codes of ethics by social workers specialising in work with disabled children who communicate non-verbally. It draws upon phenomenological interviews and other studies to highlight challenges faced by practitioners in a complex role which demands high-levels of skills and knowledge. Supporting other research, codes of ethics were rarely utilised by practitioners who typically maintain a vague appreciation while often compelled to focus upon pragmatic and quick responses to a complex role. Despite this, it is argued that principle-based frameworks embedded within codes of ethics carry important political implications. These include the potential to strengthen existing utilitarian and bioethical discourses embedded in policy or dominant professional narratives, and which can at times marginalise or exclude disabled children.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherTaylor & Francisen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/17496535.2018.1430159en
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/4.0/en
dc.subjectEthicsen
dc.subjectDisabilityen
dc.titleUsing codes of ethics for disabled children who communicate non-verbally - some challenges and implications for social workersen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.eissn1749-6543
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Chester
dc.identifier.journalEthics and Social Welfare
dc.internal.reviewer-noteChecking version of work with author SM 24/01/18en
dc.date.accepted2018-01-15
or.grant.openaccessYesen
rioxxterms.funderUnfundeden
rioxxterms.identifier.projectUnfundeden
rioxxterms.versionAMen
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2218-01-24
refterms.dateFCD2019-07-16T13:37:00Z
refterms.versionFCDAM
html.description.abstractThis article evaluates the use of professional codes of ethics by social workers specialising in work with disabled children who communicate non-verbally. It draws upon phenomenological interviews and other studies to highlight challenges faced by practitioners in a complex role which demands high-levels of skills and knowledge. Supporting other research, codes of ethics were rarely utilised by practitioners who typically maintain a vague appreciation while often compelled to focus upon pragmatic and quick responses to a complex role. Despite this, it is argued that principle-based frameworks embedded within codes of ethics carry important political implications. These include the potential to strengthen existing utilitarian and bioethical discourses embedded in policy or dominant professional narratives, and which can at times marginalise or exclude disabled children.


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