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dc.contributor.authorBaker, Chris*
dc.contributor.authorGraham, Elaine L.*
dc.date.accessioned2018-01-22T14:41:52Z
dc.date.available2018-01-22T14:41:52Z
dc.date.issued2017-09-30
dc.identifier.citationBaker, C.R. & Graham, E.L. (2017). Urban Ecology and Faith Communities. In K. Day and S. Kim (eds.), Brill Companion to Public Theology (pp. 390-417). Leiden: Brill.en
dc.identifier.isbn9789004336056
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/620803
dc.description.abstractThis chapter seeks to address a framing question of this volume, ‘What does a public theology look like in the 21st century?’ It will do so with reference to the strikingly pervasive and fluid material cultures and imaginaries of the urban which are influencing our increasingly globalized understandings of what it means to be ‘in community’ with others. The chapter will locate this contemporary context within an historical trajectory which moves from the origins of biblical theology and reflection on the city as site of divine providence and covenant, to the emergence of the modern industrial city of the mid-nineteenth century, when ‘[b]eing self-consciously urban’ definitively transformed the church’s understanding of ‘the context of mission and the possibilities of wider engagement’ with corresponding implications for the nature of public theology itself.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherBrillen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.brill.com/products/book/companion-public-theologyen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/en
dc.subjectUrban Theologyen
dc.subjectPublic Theologyen
dc.titleUrban Ecology and Faith Communitiesen
dc.typeBook chapteren
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Chesteren
dc.date.accepted2016-12-01
or.grant.openaccessYesen
rioxxterms.funderunfundeden
rioxxterms.identifier.projectunfundeden
rioxxterms.versionAMen
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2217-09-30
refterms.dateFCD2019-07-31T13:56:22Z
refterms.versionFCDAM
html.description.abstractThis chapter seeks to address a framing question of this volume, ‘What does a public theology look like in the 21st century?’ It will do so with reference to the strikingly pervasive and fluid material cultures and imaginaries of the urban which are influencing our increasingly globalized understandings of what it means to be ‘in community’ with others. The chapter will locate this contemporary context within an historical trajectory which moves from the origins of biblical theology and reflection on the city as site of divine providence and covenant, to the emergence of the modern industrial city of the mid-nineteenth century, when ‘[b]eing self-consciously urban’ definitively transformed the church’s understanding of ‘the context of mission and the possibilities of wider engagement’ with corresponding implications for the nature of public theology itself.


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