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dc.contributor.authorTaylor, Barry*
dc.date.accessioned2017-12-21T15:04:53Z
dc.date.available2017-12-21T15:04:53Z
dc.date.issued2018-02-07
dc.identifier.citationTaylor, B. (2018). Subsistence, environment and Mesolithic landscape archaeology. Cambridge Archaeological Journal, 28(3), 493-510. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0959774318000021en
dc.identifier.doi10.1017/S0959774318000021
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/620776
dc.descriptionThis article has been accepted for publication and will appear in a revised form, subsequent to peer review and/or editorial input by Cambridge University Press, in Cambridge Archaeological Journal published by Cambridge University Press. Copyright HSS Journals.
dc.description.abstractSince the 1970’s research into Mesolithic landscapes has been heavily influenced by economic models of human activity where patterns of settlement and mobility result from the relationship between subsistence practices and the environment. However, in reconstructing these patterns we have tended to generalise both the modes of subsistence and the temporal and spatial variability of the environment, and ignored the role that cultural practices played in the way subsistence tasks were organised. Whilst more recent research has emphasised the importance that cultural practices played in the way landscapes were perceived and understood, these have tended to underplay the role of subsistence and have continued to consider the environment in a very generalised manner. This paper argues that we can only develop detailed accounts of Mesolithic landscapes by looking at the specific forms of subsistence practice and the complex relationships they created with the environment. It will also show that the inhabitation of Mesolithic landscapes was structured around cultural attitudes to particular places and to the environment, and that this can be seen archaeologically through practices of deposition and recursive patterns of occupation at certain sites.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherCambridge University Pressen
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/cambridge-archaeological-journalen
dc.subjectArchaeologyen
dc.subjectMesolithicen
dc.titleSubsistence, environment and Mesolithic landscape archaeologyen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.eissn1474-0540
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Chesteren
dc.identifier.journalCambridge Archaeological Journalen
dc.date.accepted2017-12-05
or.grant.openaccessYesen
rioxxterms.funderUniversity of Chesteren
rioxxterms.identifier.projectFaculty Research Leaveen
rioxxterms.versionAMen
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2017-12-05
refterms.dateFCD2019-09-18T12:21:57Z
refterms.versionFCDAM
refterms.dateFOA2018-08-13T17:29:45Z
html.description.abstractSince the 1970’s research into Mesolithic landscapes has been heavily influenced by economic models of human activity where patterns of settlement and mobility result from the relationship between subsistence practices and the environment. However, in reconstructing these patterns we have tended to generalise both the modes of subsistence and the temporal and spatial variability of the environment, and ignored the role that cultural practices played in the way subsistence tasks were organised. Whilst more recent research has emphasised the importance that cultural practices played in the way landscapes were perceived and understood, these have tended to underplay the role of subsistence and have continued to consider the environment in a very generalised manner. This paper argues that we can only develop detailed accounts of Mesolithic landscapes by looking at the specific forms of subsistence practice and the complex relationships they created with the environment. It will also show that the inhabitation of Mesolithic landscapes was structured around cultural attitudes to particular places and to the environment, and that this can be seen archaeologically through practices of deposition and recursive patterns of occupation at certain sites.


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