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dc.contributor.authorMilner, Nicky*
dc.contributor.authorBamforth, Michael*
dc.contributor.authorBeale, Gareth*
dc.contributor.authorCarty, Julian C.*
dc.contributor.authorChatzipanagis, Konstantinos*
dc.contributor.authorCroft, Shannon*
dc.contributor.authorElliott, Ben*
dc.contributor.authorFitton, Laura C.*
dc.contributor.authorKnight, Becky*
dc.contributor.authorKröger, Roland*
dc.contributor.authorLittle, Aimee*
dc.contributor.authorNeedham, Andy*
dc.contributor.authorRobson, Harry K.*
dc.contributor.authorRowley, Charlotte C. A.*
dc.contributor.authorTaylor, Barry*
dc.contributor.authorConneller, Chantal
dc.date.accessioned2017-12-19T11:00:03Z
dc.date.available2017-12-19T11:00:03Z
dc.date.issued2016-02-26
dc.identifier.citationMilner, N., Bamforth, M., Beale, G., Carty, J. C., Chatzipanagis, K., Croft, S., Elliott, B., Fitton, L. C., Knight, B., Kroger, R., Little, A., Needham, A., Robson, H. K., Rowley, C. A, Taylor, B. (2016). A unique engraved shale pendant from the site of Star Carr: the oldest Mesolithic art in Britain. Internet Archaeology, 40(8).en
dc.identifier.issn1363-5387
dc.identifier.doi10.11141/ia.40.8
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/620769
dc.description.abstractIn 2015 an engraved shale pendant was found during excavations at the Early Mesolithic site of Star Carr, UK. Engraved motifs on Mesolithic pendants are extremely rare, with the exception of amber pendants from southern Scandinavia. The artwork on the pendant is the earliest known Mesolithic art in Britain; the 'barbed line' motif is comparable to styles on the Continent, particularly in Denmark. When it was first uncovered the lines were barely visible but using a range of digital imaging techniques it has been possible to examine them in detail and determine the style of engraving as well as the order in which the lines might have been made. In addition, microwear and residue analyses were applied to examine whether the pendant showed signs that it had been strung or worn, and whether the lines had been made more visible through the application of pigments, as has been suggested for some Danish amber pendants. This approach of using multiple scientific and analytical techniques has not been used previously and provides a methodology for the examination of similar artefacts in the future.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherInternet Archaeologyen
dc.relation.urlhttp://intarch.ac.uk/journal/issue40/8/index.htmlen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectArchaeologyen
dc.subjectMesolithicen
dc.subjectStar Carren
dc.titleA unique engraved shale pendant from the site of Star Carren
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of York; University of Manchester; University of Chesteren
dc.identifier.journalInternet Archaeologyen
dc.internal.reviewer-noteEmailed author for a clean version of the work. 13-12-16 GMen
or.grant.openaccessYesen
rioxxterms.funderEuropean Research Council (POSTGLACIAL project, No. 283938)en
rioxxterms.identifier.projectunfundeden
rioxxterms.versionAMen
rioxxterms.versionofrecordhttps://doi/org/10.11141/ia.40.8
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2016-02-26
refterms.dateFCD2019-07-31T15:22:22Z
refterms.versionFCDAM
refterms.dateFOA2018-08-13T16:40:13Z
html.description.abstractIn 2015 an engraved shale pendant was found during excavations at the Early Mesolithic site of Star Carr, UK. Engraved motifs on Mesolithic pendants are extremely rare, with the exception of amber pendants from southern Scandinavia. The artwork on the pendant is the earliest known Mesolithic art in Britain; the 'barbed line' motif is comparable to styles on the Continent, particularly in Denmark. When it was first uncovered the lines were barely visible but using a range of digital imaging techniques it has been possible to examine them in detail and determine the style of engraving as well as the order in which the lines might have been made. In addition, microwear and residue analyses were applied to examine whether the pendant showed signs that it had been strung or worn, and whether the lines had been made more visible through the application of pigments, as has been suggested for some Danish amber pendants. This approach of using multiple scientific and analytical techniques has not been used previously and provides a methodology for the examination of similar artefacts in the future.
rioxxterms.publicationdate2016-02-26
dc.dateAccepted2016-01-12
dc.date.deposited2017-12-19


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